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The Gym Arcade 143

Posted by kdawson
from the exertainment dept.
theodp writes "Cross Halo with an exercise bike, and you get Expresso Fitness' S3, which lets you blow away dragons by squeezing handlebar-mounted triggers as you pedal hard through the Chinese countryside. Portfolio notes that a new generation of Wii-like workouts is hitting gyms and homes, with companies like GameRunner incorporating treadmills into First Person Shooters and Kickstart offering mini steppers and cycles for popular game systems."
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The Gym Arcade

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  • lmao (Score:1, Offtopic)

    hahaha using guns to make guns...
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by donweel (304991)
      I have been in the Fitness Equipment repair business for 7 years so I have seen this sort of thing b4. I can tell you this it has been tried many times many ways, never popular. Try to sell the stuff used to a home equipment buyer perhaps, nope. People want to get on a treadmill or bike and just zone out for an hour or so. I have seen Life Cycles with nintendos built in with controllers on handlebars, Cybex Virtual Bike with tilt seat that lets you steer through a soccer game ... there were others too can't
  • by philspear (1142299) on Sunday November 02, 2008 @06:49PM (#25605993)

    The crowd that has labeled themselves the "hardcore" gamers is going to be upset about this. Innovation in games and getting new people interested in gaming drives the improvement of games directly and indirectly, both because as the market gets bigger, people start taking games more seriously and putting more effort into them and directly because more money from wider releases means more development money for future projects. There are people upset gaming moved out of 16 bit, people who still think final fantasy sold out when they made the leap to the 3rd dimension. Not sure why they don't realize there are still games being made for them, there are just additional games now. I guess they'd prefer to have all games released explicitly for them even if it meant they never got any better.

    Just a few observations. "Casual" gamer interest is improving games, not degrading them.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by blahplusplus (757119) *

      "The crowd that has labeled themselves the "hardcore" gamers is going to be upset about this."

      Cue "hardcore are the sux" troll. No one is going to be upset about this, the hardcore is not "upset" about gaming becoming more mainstream. In fact MANY hardcore gamers are behind the push of "exer-gaming", many hardcore gamers have had the thought about combining gaming with their exercise. I know because I used to do it, it's the whole reason many of us got a DS or gameboy advance - you can sit on a exercise

      • This false idea that the hardcore are all anti-casual gamer is a bunch of bullshit pedalled by internet trolls.

        Go to gamefaqs.com sometime, the wii boards, if you honestly think it's a hoax. If not, then I have to applaud you on the spinjob there.

        • by quantax (12175)
          Not for nothing but who cares what the brain damage cases at gamefaqs.com think? That is hardly a sampling of the 'hardcore gamer' demographic, a nebulous and ill-defined thing at best. Hell, other 'hardcore gamers' might argue that console gamers are the very definition of mainstream. Thus their opinions would be worth the same as people who are addicted to The Sims. Hardcore gamers is a bullshit demographic when you get right down to it, why go on giving it any more validity than it deserves?
        • "Go to gamefaqs.com sometime, the wii boards, if you honestly think it's a hoax"

          These sites are not representative of the gaming community at large, they are anecdotal at best. Not only that, but most hardcore gamers are older then the whiny peeps you find at gamefaqs and the wii boards. You have a minority of whiny people who know shit all about gaming, If they have even been with gaming since the 80's or earlier. Remember only people who have something to whine about will post, so you get a disproport

          • Right, but it's proof that your statement "This false idea that the hardcore are all anti-casual gamer is a bunch of bullshit pedalled by internet trolls," is not correct. There ARE people who call themselves hardcore that are upset at what they call "casual."

            Those people are idiots who are not representative of the gaming community, I agree, but you can't tell me they're not out there, because they are.

      • I've been a gamer pretty much all my life. My grandpa had an Atari 2600 I used to play, when I was like 7 years old my mom got me an NES and so on. Games are, to this day, my primary form of entertainment. By pretty much any definition I'd be a "hardcore" gamer. Personally, I think it's wonderful to see more and more people get in to gaming. I think it is extremely entertaining and a good amount of entertainment for the dollars. Also, I think it is better mentally for you than just sacking out in from of th

    • The reasons that most hardcore gamers don't like the "new age of games" include a lot of things. Number one, they have more disposable income to spend on games and less free-time and more stress. This isn't back when they were 10 and had to settle for 3 NES games for Christmas, 2 NES games for their birthdays, etc. So they want a lot more games, they also want them to be very intense, to take them off of the stress of the day, they don't want short games like a lot of the Wii games, they want good 50 hour +
      • So they want a lot more games, they also want them to be very intense, to take them off of the stress of the day, they don't want short games like a lot of the Wii games

        But those are the ones to take the stress away. Nothing better to relax than a few rounds of Dr. Mario online. OTOH, Trying to remember what Storyline and Questhooks you left behing in Zelda 3 weeks ago when you last found the time to play IS stress.

        I'm still waiting for a "Story Arc Recap"-Feature for Games.

        • I'm still waiting for a "Story Arc Recap"-Feature for Games.

          Most of the Tales games by Namco have that, at least Tales of Symphonia does and I think the GBA remake of Phantasia did too....

    • Large migrations to the market change how businesses target gamers. This means games are no longer developed for nerds, they're developed for everyone.

  • An idea (Score:5, Interesting)

    by cvd6262 (180823) on Sunday November 02, 2008 @06:52PM (#25606019)

    I've been playing a little Red Alert (1) since it was released for free this year. At the same time, the weather is turning cold and I've had to set up my bicycle on a stationary trainer. Wouldn't it be cool to have an RTS where at least one of your resources was wattage produced from some exercise?

    Pedal faster, build more units/buildings/etc.

    • cf. Propcycle (Score:5, Interesting)

      by 6Yankee (597075) on Sunday November 02, 2008 @06:56PM (#25606065)

      First thing that came to my mind when I read the headline was Propcycle [videogameworkout.com].

      I'd love to rig something similar up, using MS Flight Simulator and an exercise bike.

      • I thought of that too, I tried one at a walmart once, sure wish there was one around here, or I could make a home version of Prop Cycle.

        Here is the KLOV link witch some screenshots

        http://www.klov.com/game_detail.php?game_id=9139 [klov.com]

      • Whoa, this so brings my memories back. I liked that game very much.

        Of course I was never able to clear any level, seeing I was 10 back then, and all I tried is to pedal as hard as possible (not the smartest thing to do)...

        I wish they remake that game.

      • As Informative.

      • by crossmr (957846)

        you want to peddle from Hongkong to England be my guest...

        • by 6Yankee (597075)

          Bollocks to that! In one go, anyway.

          But start off with circuits at my local airfield, and work up to a flight to the next airfield... There's no reason why you couldn't set yourself a massive goal. I've always wanted to fly from Scotland to New York, via the Faroes, Iceland, Greenland and Canada - I'm a licensed (though lapsed) pilot and, in fact, I have all the ONC charts not five feet from me as I type. Admittedly, doing it in a simulated PA-28, with 8-hour flights and nowhere to divert if your legs fall

      • by Animats (122034)

        I liked PropCycle too. But it wasn't free flight; you were constrained to a track. I'm amazed that someone hasn't done a gym version of something like Crimson Skies, which is available in a motion-platform arcade version.

        The gym I use had some stair-climbers with web browsers for a while, but they were from a dot-com. When the dot-com failed, the units continued to work, but without a server to update them, they played the same ads over and over. Eventually the things were removed.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      Personally, I'd like some sort of racing game that uses your output on the stationary trainer's resistance wheel to propel your character (car, hovercraft, whatever) forwards, and some sort of device that sits under the fork's dropouts to control steering in the game. I once read about a similar system, but it was very, very, expensive, and it wasn't really a game. You just saw pretty pictures roll past on the screen.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by ^DA (82715)

        Check this out: http://www.tacxvr.com/ [tacxvr.com]

        Makes indoor cycling at home almost bearable. I say almost because I have such a rig but I never use it, I prefer to cycle outdoors or in a spin class.

        Lot of people enjoy it though. Here in Norway there is a winter series on these contraptions where people compete in a mix of VR terrains and Real Life Videos.

    • by aliquis (678370)

      Personally I like the battle of brains / fun strats / unexpected things and such in RTSes, not doing workouts.

      I play WC3 first and go to the gym later, or the other way around, depending on how serious I am :D

      Back in the days Quake used to work just fine as cardiovascular training to, all that stress, fear and anger must have lead o something :D
      If nothing else slamming the mouse in the table each time you die sure as hell has to work your lats, or something :D

    • The only thing is that you definitely *don't* want to be going all out during cario exercise. You want to be keeping at the right heart rate. Better would be a game that went fastest when you are closest to the target heart rate for your age.

      • by rlk (1089)

        There's nothing wrong with going at a steady pace, but at least what I've been led to believe is that if you want to improve your fitness you need to vary your workouts, do intervals (30-60 seconds all out, similar amount of time at a resting pace, or variations). The terrain variation lets you decide whether to gear down to spin at a steady pace or power over the top with a quick burst.

      • by shermo (1284310)

        Nonsense. The only thing is that you definitely *don't* want to be doing when training is maintaining constant heart rate. This will make you fitter, but it's certainly not the most efficient way to go about achieving it.

        Long duration 'target heart rate' workouts are good for building a base cardio level to work with. Think of this as increasing the size of your car engine

        Interval training, however, is excellent for peaking your base fitness. Think of this as tuning your car engine so it works better.

        • Going all out is not "interval training", but this is exactly what making the game speed match the wattage will encourage. Instead, the player will likely ramp up until near collapse, and then stop entirely.

          Interval training requires you ramp bake the effort periodically. If the game encourages that sort of thing, then by all means, that's great.

          • by shermo (1284310)

            My definition of interval training certainly includes periods of going all out, moderated with less intense periods. Maybe we're talking past each other.

            You're right in that a game that encourages go-as-hard-as-you-can-for-as-long-as-you-can is not a particularly good training model, but that wasn't what I was suggesting.

          • But would such a game encourage this? It may seem to, but if you can't get past the first level due to overexertion, you'll learn to pace yourself, surely?
    • by ramul (1103299)
      That is a really really good idea.

      more resources, or stat/xp points in an rp. I'd buy it. You could do a weights equivalent too.

  • Why not just play laser game? Seems like much more fun and "creative."

    I'm all for working out but cardio exercise in general is fucking boring. Coupled with an FPS it probably get more fun if it works decent but I doubt it can beat reality.

    Something like laser game but out in the wild (as in urban setting / forest / ..) must be awesome. More wargames for everyone! :D

    Riding a stationary bike in a gym even if you got a virtual rider riding on a screen as well will still just be a stationary bike in the same f

    • "Why not just play laser game? Seems like much more fun and "creative.""

      Can I have that in a home version?

      "I'm all for working out but cardio exercise in general is fucking boring. Coupled with an FPS it probably get more fun if it works decent but I doubt it can beat reality."

      The Chinese version however has you shooting peasants as you pedal along.

      • by aliquis (678370)

        Oh, didn't got that it was for home usage, I saw it more like gym equipment.

        There is some laser game things for home usage to but I guess they suck.

        Where is the outdoor version!?! With slow showing laser beams :D

        The Chinese version however has you shooting peasants as you pedal along.

        Carmageddon pedal car edition? :D

        Ok, if the car could react a la electronic bump cars and you could hit each other someway then maybe :D

    • by Shin-LaC (1333529)
      Realistically, laser game gives you about 5% the exercise you get from a treadmill or a stationary bike.

      I'm afraid many people don't understand the point of a gym. You go to the gym to exercise efficiently, not to have fun. That's why people go to the gym even though it's mind-numbingly boring. Of course, if you can make it fun as well, it's even better, but it won't change people's priorities. "A lot of exercise with a bit of fun" is still going to beat "a lot of fun with a bit of exercise" if your goal
      • by aliquis (678370)

        That depends on how you play laser game, and how serious you are on a treadmill or on a bike.

        YOU may go to a gym because it gives the maximum result for the least effort, but you shouldn't expect that to be the case for everyone else.

        And there are more fun things to do in a gym than running on a treadmill, practising olympic lifts for example or vertical jumps or whatever.

        And more don't have to be better since recovery and food consumption effects the results as well.

        Anyway, fact is that you are much more l

    • by crossmr (957846)

      Not everyone lives in a forest or near a forest.
      Having a choice between getting smoked on the street and using the stationary bike at the gym I'll choose the stationary bike.

  • TRON comes one step closer to reality...
  • by schnikies79 (788746) on Sunday November 02, 2008 @07:35PM (#25606341)

    I lift for about an hour 5 days/week and run about 30-40mpw. When I work out, I want to be unpluged. I don't want to see a screen, don't want to interact.

    It's my mind, my body and me. Nothing else. Everyone needs it.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by brian.stinar (1104135)

      Hey,

      I ride my road bike around a lot. Due to that fact that I live in Albuquerque, New Mexico and the weather almost always allows bicycling as a means of transportation, I have been able to keep my goal of going through one tank of gas per month on my SUV. I'm also fairly into mountain biking, with the beautiful foot hills available for single track and Sandia mountain available for downhill riding.

      So, I'm pretty into biking. The goal of the above was to add SOME level of credibility to the below...

      I tried

      • Back in the early-mid 90's, when I was in high school, I belonged to the local golds gym. They had a "virtual reality" exercise bike that was a recumbent bike, with a monitor on top. You could pedal whereever you wanted, up hills, down trails, on roads. resistance on the pedaling would change to match the terain. (you could even go really fast and do virtual jumps!). Probably the coolest thing was that there was a second bike right next to it, and the two were linked. you could follow each other, race,

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      Then this definitely isn't something for you; you've got a good workout system that you enjoy. A lot of people find working out to be pretty boring and uncomfortable, though, which leaves them trying to force themselves to do something they don't enjoy.

      Adding a gaming aspect to the workout removes the boredom and distracts from the discomfort, allowing these people to get the exercise they know they need--and enjoy it rather than enduring it (or maybe just giving up something they hate doing).
    • To each his own. I run from 3 to 6 hours a week (plus a few hours of biking, mainly to go to work) and I have nothing against a game which would allow me to do some fun activities.

    • "I lift for about an hour 5 days/week and run about 30-40mpw"

      Expect joint and tendon issues Real Soon Now if thats true since you're way overdoing it. Pro athletes might do that much but they have expert trainers who know exactly what to do when. I doubt you do.

    • by sorak (246725)

      I lift for about an hour 5 days/week and run about 30-40mpw. When I work out, I want to be unpluged. I don't want to see a screen, don't want to interact.

      It's my mind, my body and me. Nothing else. Everyone needs it.

      And that's why you don't need these products. You have to realize, however, that you are in the minority.

    • If you can run outside, then good for you. I have bad knees - I jog a half a mile a day for five days in a row, and I'm limping. I try to do it anyhow, but I probably shouldn't. Plus I live in Chicago, where you can only exercise outdoors for about half the year anyhow. So I'm left with the gym, and trust me, although the elliptical is awesome for my knees it is BORING. I've been using it to catch up on reading (I'm a grad student), but video games would also be good. I've played my DS on a recumbent exerci
  • by rlk (1089) on Sunday November 02, 2008 @07:53PM (#25606481)

    We have one of these at work, and we're expecting another. It's a blast. And I'm not a gamer.

    First, the downsides:

    1) The shifter is not very well designed. It's a single lever mounted on the stem, which is an inconvenient spot. With 30 "gears" and very sharp changes of gradient, it's not uncommon to have to shift by 10 gears or more in a matter of seconds to avoid stalling out. The shifting doesn't seem all that responsive either, so there's a tendency to overshift, which usually leaves you moving too slowly. I'd rather have two shifters mounted on the bars, with the left shifter giving you 3-5 gears in one shot (i. e. something like front and rear derailleurs on a "real" bike). This is by far the weakest part of the setup. If they would fix that, it would be a much stronger product.

    2) Every course I've tried has at least one very sharp downhill curve, which I find disorienting (maybe because I'm not a gamer). Shutting my eyes helps, but then I don't know what terrain is coming up, so I'm likely to be in the wrong gear in a hurry. One person at the gym tried it once and found that he just couldn't use it because of that.

    3) The saddle simply isn't very good. It's adjustable in maybe 1/2" increments both vertically and front to back (which is OK for this purpose, but finer increments would be better). However, it's a wide, heavily cushioned saddle, which really isn't very comfortable for long rides. It would be nice if there were a couple of different saddles to pick from, and you could just plunk down the one you like at any given time. It's a much better saddle than the usual exercise bike saddle, but that's not saying much.

    Good points:

    1) There's just a lot more variety than any other exercise bike I've seen (not that I'm an expert). The changing terrain makes things interesting, much more so than any standard programs. That's a huge plus.

    2) The pedals are "real", with toe clips on one side (yes, the old fashioned kind, but they work) and clip-in pedals on the other. I'm not sure which clip-in system; it's obviously one of the SPD variants, but I don't know which one. If your bike shoes have a different system, it's not likely to work. The system looks like it doesn't have any side to side or rotational play, which makes it hard for some folks (when I was riding, I absolutely needed that because of my overpronation and toe-out).

    3) There's a good range of courses, everything from a 1 mile flat track course to a 20 miler that looks like a major mountain pass. They're divided into four groups (plus one more "ride over the monsters" type thing), for easy, moderate, hard, and extreme, and ranked from easy to harder within the groups. The pace rider rides slower on the easy ones and harder on the hard ones, and you can adjust the continuous output of the pace rider. There are a few courses that aren't available without a paid membership, but it's not worth $10 a month just to get those few courses.

    4) The bike can be connected to the internet, with some additional features (I don't know what they all are; ours isn't connected yet).

    Neutral points:

    1) While your avatar responds to the steering, it doesn't really affect the riding in any way, except on the game course. It won't let you go off the course (if you try to steer off, or don't try to steer on, it just keeps you at the side of the course). You can also ride right through other riders, and they can ride through you if you're slower. It doesn't really feel natural, but without actual movement, it would be very hard to make the steering feel natural. I don't care all that much.

    2) I don't know how it computes the relationship between wattage (power output) and calorie consumption. It gives me somewhat lower calorie numbers compared to the other exercise bikes we have, which may or may not be due to shifting response (it's easy to not shift high enough on downhills). For a 30~40 minute ride, I've averaged 227~240 watts vs. 235~260 that I typically average on the

    • by jasenj1 (575309)

      There are a bunch of these at the Y I belong to. They are all networked together and if you ride the same course as someone else, you can see each other on the track. I think they are hooked up to a national network, too, and you can go online to check your records.

      Ours have a few different seats/saddles available so you can use a more racing oriented saddle or the big cushy ones.

      I totally agree with the above review about the shifting. It is inconvenient and could/should be done much better. From a workout

    • by stickyc (38756)

      We have one of these at work, and we're expecting another. It's a blast. And I'm not a gamer.

      First, the downsides:

      1) The shifter is not very well designed. It's a single lever mounted on the stem, which is an inconvenient spot. With 30 "gears" and very sharp changes of gradient, it's not uncommon to have to shift by 10 gears or more in a matter of seconds to avoid stalling out. The shifting doesn't seem all that responsive either, so there's a tendency to overshift, which usually leaves you moving too slowly. I'd rather have two shifters mounted on the bars, with the left shifter giving you 3-5 gears in one shot (i. e. something like front and rear derailleurs on a "real" bike). This is by far the weakest part of the setup. If they would fix that, it would be a much stronger product.

      The S3 model has shift buttons on the handlebars, are you sure you don't have an S2 model (the S3 has a widescreen 17" monitor where the S2 has a 4x3 14" monitor)? Also, on all the models, you can shift using the up and down arrows on the control panel, but the beeping can get annoying after a while.

      3) The saddle simply isn't very good. It's adjustable in maybe 1/2" increments both vertically and front to back (which is OK for this purpose, but finer increments would be better). However, it's a wide, heavily cushioned saddle, which really isn't very comfortable for long rides. It would be nice if there were a couple of different saddles to pick from, and you could just plunk down the one you like at any given time. It's a much better saddle than the usual exercise bike saddle, but that's not saying much.

      There are several models of saddle available and you can easily swap them out, maybe talk to your facilities person and see if they'll order a different seat?

      Good points:

      4) The bike can be connected to the internet, with some additional features (I don't know what they all are; ours isn't connected yet).

      The back-end support is where the EF 'experience' rea

  • I've been waiting for this for some time - the first real step of many which will end in something like the Star Trek holodeck. And when the illusion is complete, we will all die - b/c who would want to leave a world that can fulfill all of our desires? :-)
    • selfish much? (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Layth (1090489)

      some of us have a desire to leave the world in better condition than we found it.

      This involves life outside of simulation, even if games are a great escape in moderation.

      • by fractoid (1076465)
        Given how us humans generally treat our immediate environment, I'd think that it would be a good thing for the condition of the world in general if that environment was simulated and had a reset button.
  • ESPN Street Racing (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Layth (1090489)

    The key is to really work fun game play into the system, and I think this has a much greater chance of success than the children's "educational game software" attempts to make learning fun.

    I remember an old playstation ESPN racing game where your character would ride around on a bike, but you could kick the other players on either side and knock them to the ground.

    Add some blood, maybe a few screams as they hit the pavement and I think we would have a winner!

    If you want to get really sophisticated that woul

  • Accurate as usual (Score:4, Informative)

    by ucblockhead (63650) on Sunday November 02, 2008 @08:09PM (#25606629) Homepage Journal

    I see Slashdot is showing its attention to journalistic accuracy. I've actually *played* Expresso bike thing and you don't "gun down" dragons with "handle-bar mounted triggers".

    The buttons are the handle-bars are for shifting gears. The basic gameplay is that you run over coins of various colors and then have to go run into dragons of the matching color. (With various point values.) It's a pretty lame game, but it is mildly distracting.

    I suspect that most people will stick to the basic "ride around a track with a pace rider" bit, which is decent enough.

    The biggest problem is that even if you play at a machine in the gym, you still have to shell out $9.95/month to unlock a lot of the tracks. That's a pretty hefty price for a bike-racing game.

    • by rlk (1089)

      It was something like 1-2 tracks per level that are locked, out of a total of maybe 8 per level. That's no big deal.

  • GameBike (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Steve525 (236741) on Sunday November 02, 2008 @08:10PM (#25606637)

    This isn't exactly a new idea. I bought a gamebike (http://www.cateyefitness.com/GameBike/ [cateyefitness.com]) a year ago for this sort of thing. It's an exercise bike which plugs into a PS2. Unfortunately, I don't have a TV for it, yet. So, at the moment it's just serving as an ordinary exercise bike. My impression from the brief time I tried it, is that'll it'll be more fun that just riding an exercise bike, but it isn't a great controller. Part of the problem is that PS2 games aren't made with this bike in mind. Custom games written for it could make it much more fun.

  • There was something like this in the mid 90's in the local college's gym when I was growing up.
  • Wow, technology's finally invented a way you can exercise and compete at the same time, and how hard you exercise affects how well you do in the game. That's pretty cool. it sounds totally revolutionary. Maybe the next step will be networked FPS, where, for instance, you ride your exercise bike against someone else, each with gun-buttons in the handle bars. Or in Tron, where how fast you pedal determines the speed of your bike.

    And then after they've got games where you exercise while competing head-to-he
  • This was done in the mid 90s. It was the Tectrix Virtual Reality bike. They ran on a Pentium 75. If They were a big hit but too expensive for the type of people that both working out and gaming.

    http://tulrich.com/tectrixvr/ [tulrich.com]

  • There's already been a boom and bust with the exercise computer game market, way predating the Wii.

    For serious training types, used in the comfort of your own home, they've had road simulators for years. You hook your regular bike up to it and the computer projects the road course onto a big projection screen in front of you. You use this when it's the winter months and you can't ride out in the real world. There's no game element to it, it's pure sim. Not very common, very expensive, only for bike addicts.

  • We have the Expresso bikes at my college. I don't really like the "Dragon" game, but racing friends on some of the crazy courses (ie. Ascension) is a lot of fun.

  • to an existing bike? Just put a sensor on the wheel, similar to speedometers that you can add on to any bike (I think they detect the spokes crossing in front of them or actually touch the wheel), a couple buttons you can attach to the handlebars, and then just some software that can read that and affix your own monitor in front of the bike?

    The advantage is that you wouldn't be bound do the bike they include with it. Platform independent, as it were. So not liking the shifter or the seat wouldn't be
  • It has even been done by Fisher-Price. [fisher-price.com]
  • Woohoo.. this is just one step closer.. put me in the game for sure!!

  • Climbing the scaffold looks like a serious workout, especially with that damned monkey smashing the barrels directly on your head.
    Real-Life Donkey Kong [gizmodo.com]
  • I think there could some great implementations here. If you could do like one of the BMX style games with tricks and stuff, except allow the "go forward" power to come from bike wheels rather then the rest, but have some buttons in there for the tricks. It might result in a lot of start/stop biking, but could be cool.

    Another thing, is to just get some really cool virtual worlds going, and network all the bikes up. I could see a gym lan, where the line up of bikes has a bunch of options where you can join in

  • I have an exercise bike wheel that hooks up to my computer. The movement of the pedals can be mapped to keyboard keys. Using it, I can control the forward and backward motion for games which can use the arrow keys to move. I use a USB numeric keypad or a wireless joystick for the other movements and functions. I've played Resident Evil 3 and 4, and Silent Hill 2, and also Baulder's Gate like this. It worked great in all those games.

    The biggest problem is finding games that work well with it. It works

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