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Power Technology

Toshiba Battery Charges In 10 Minutes 203

Posted by samzenpus
from the watch-the-lights-dim dept.
Slatterz writes "Toshiba has unveiled a battery prototype that offers a 90 percent charge capacity in just 10 minutes. The Super Charge Ion Battery (SCIB) is capable of handling 5,000 to 6,000 recharge cycles, compared to the typical 500 offered by standard lithium-ion batteries. The new battery is composed of a durable material that offers a high level of thermal stability and prevents overheating."
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Toshiba Battery Charges In 10 Minutes

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  • a better link (Score:5, Informative)

    by Tumbleweed (3706) * on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @06:42PM (#25226657)

    Is the InfoWorld article this seems to have come from:

    Right here [infoworld.com]

    This is being shown in a laptop, and will be in a Schwinn bicycle next year.

    This sounds good, certainly, but I'm *really* hoping eeStor's superduperultracapacitor technology works out as advertised. That will change the world.

    • Re:a better link (Score:5, Informative)

      by szquirrel (140575) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @06:52PM (#25226801) Homepage

      Even better, this article [marketwatch.com]. More tech specs.

      • Of interest... (Score:2, Informative)

        by bryxal (933863)
        from TFA:

        3. Rapidly rechargeable The superb safety characteristics of SCiB allow recharge with a current as large as 50 amperes (A), allowing the SCiB Cell and SCiB Battery Module to recharge to 90% of full capacity in only five minutes(1).

        (my bold) Personally I don't have a 50A jack lying around.

        • Re:Of interest... (Score:5, Informative)

          by beav007 (746004) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @08:19PM (#25227729) Journal
          And you won't need one.

          Let's use Australian numbers (because I know them):
          Available voltage from a standard wall outlet: 240v
          Available amps: 10
          Using Ohms law (and assuming resistance will remain roughly the same), I should be able to get nearly 100A @ 24v using a step-down transformer. Most laptops have an input of around 19v. As long as the leads can handle the amperage, it shouldn't be an issue.

          It's the leads that will be an issue. IIRC, cars need 50-80A @ 12v to start. The leads that come off the battery for the starter motor are pretty big, and they only need to handle that current draw for up to 10 seconds...
          • by PayPaI (733999)
            100A is going to require at least 2 AWG wire. Good luck with that one. Also the connector on the laptop will be xbox-hueg
            • by nmg196 (184961)

              No.. the article refers to 12V or 24V charger for a laptop, not 110V or 240V mains electricity. It also only needs to handle it for a few seconds, so overheating is not a problem. The cables won't need to be any fatter than normal mains cable.

          • Re:Of interest... (Score:5, Informative)

            by torkus (1133985) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @10:39PM (#25228839)

            Actually it's quite a bit more than that in a car. You'll see a good 3-500 amps and more depending on engine size, age, temperature and other starting conditions.

            In fact, batteries are rated in cold-cranking-amps - i.e. the number of amps they can supply to start the car while cold (probably around freezing, not sure of the exact temp measured at). A hefty battery is rated somewhere around 8-900 CCA.

            You're right though - the wiring only needs to support that load for ~10 seconds in a worst-case situation so the conductors don't have to be as heavy as they would otherwise.

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Yvanhoe (564877)
            So you say we need to have bigger leads between the power supply and the laptop ? This is not such a big deal...
            • by beav007 (746004)
              We are talking, at 2 AWG, just over 1/4" (6.5mm)* conductor diameter. Per wire. Not the lightest, most flexible, or most convenient size around...



              * American Wire Gauge Tables [powerstream.com]
              • by Tore S B (711705)
                That is for 50A at 110V, not for 50A at 19V.
                • Re:Of interest... (Score:5, Informative)

                  by ncc74656 (45571) * <scott@alfter.us> on Thursday October 02, 2008 @10:17AM (#25233359) Homepage Journal
                  The wire gauge needed for some application is determined by current; voltage only matters to the extent that the insulator around the wire needs to be thick enough to avoid dielectric breakdown. A power cord that carries 30A at 240V uses the same wire gauge (10 ga., IIRC) as one that carries 30A at 120V, but the thicker insulation on the 240V cord makes it a bit larger. 100A through some 24-ga. hookup wire will burn out just as fast at 1V as it will at 100V or 10kV; the higher voltages might make for bigger sparks when the wire finally melts, but the resistive heating of the wire is proportional to the square of the current.
              • We are talking, at 2 AWG, just over 1/4" (6.5mm)* conductor diameter. Per wire. Not the lightest, most flexible, or most convenient size around...

                But the guy at Best Buy told me that Monster Cables are the only way to go.....

                They have a sale on all their 3' gold plated varieties for only $197.22 (with the purchase of selected model printers)

        • by Rei (128717)

          24V * 4.2Ah = 100.8Wh
          Assuming 80% charger efficiency, you need to draw 126Wh.
          Wall current is usually something like 117V (varies), meaning you need to draw ~1.1Ah
          ~1.077Ah in 10 minutes is 6 1/2A.
          A wall socket supports 15A.

          • Wall current is usually something like 117V (varies)

            Yeah.. guess that's why they call it AC.....

        • by nmg196 (184961)

          50A at 12V is nothing. A car starter motor is usually at least double this and on a diesel engine it can be 200A quite easily. We're not talking 50A at 240V here.

      • by jimdread (1089853)
        This is the one [toshiba.co.jp] I'd go for. Toshiba press release: "Toshiba to Launch Innovative Rechargeable Battery Business" dated 11 December, 2007. From Toshiba press release to slashdot in under 10 months. Impressive! It's pretty much the same thing, all the specs are in there like voltage, capacity, size, weight.
    • Re:a better link (Score:5, Interesting)

      by lysergic.acid (845423) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @07:00PM (#25226879) Homepage

      SCiB batteries can endure 5,000 to 6,000 recharge cycles, compared to around 500 cycles for standard lithium-ion batteries, according to a Toshiba executive manning the company's booth at the Ceatec exhibition in Chiba, Japan. At the show, Toshiba showed a prototype SCiB battery installed in a Dynabook laptop. The laptop was matched

      only 500 cycles, really? that seems a little low. do they mean that after 500 charges the battery begins to decrease in capacity, or that the battery will start to fail completely after 500 charges? because that seems really really low to me.

      i mean, most rechargeable batteries today are Li-ion batteries, right? i just wanna know how many recharges i have left on my PSP.

      does it help if you make sure to plug the battery back into the charger before it's out of charge? what can you do or not do to help preserve the capacity and life-span of a li-ion battery?

      • by Korin43 (881732)
        Wikipedia lists ~1200 charges on a Lithium Ion battery [wikipedia.org], but there's a [citation needed], so I can't give you a better source :(
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by retchdog (1319261)

        I think it's pretty close - at a rough educated guess, I'd say that after 500 cycles without disciplined use (see below), you'll be around 30% of factory capacity. (I'm assuming a cycle every 1.5 days)

        Supposedly keeping the battery between 30% to 70% charge is helpful; there are utilities for this for laptops, don't know about PSP. Running it all the way down is very bad, and when I got lazy about it, my battery life did plummet (though it may have just "aged" independently, it seems connected).

        High tempera

        • Re:a better link (Score:4, Interesting)

          by lysergic.acid (845423) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @08:29PM (#25227803) Homepage

          hrm... well i guess it's a good thing that i've only let my battery die once or twice since i got it. with replacement batteries costing $40~50 a piece, i'll have to be more attentive about my charge state.

          i seem to remember seeing several different stories on /. about "revolutionary" new battery techs, but i still haven't seen any alternatives to traditional li-ion batteries being sold at commercial retailers. IMHO lithium-titanate [wikipedia.org] batteries look promising. manufacturers are claiming that these new lithium batteries can recharge in under 10 minutes--and that's for use in electric vehicles. this New Scientist article [newscientist.com] reports that mobile devices using lithium-titanate can recharge in 6 minutes, and each battery is capable of going through 20,000 charge cycles.

          i'm guessing this technology is probably still too expensive to bring to market. it'll probably only be used in electric vehicles or other such applications which require much more durability and longer life-spans than traditional Li-ion batteries currently provide.

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by shmlco (594907)

            Those are 500 FULL cycles. Use 33% of the battery one day, recharge, 33% of the battery the next day, recharge, and 33% of the battery the next day, and recharge, and you'll bascially have used one full cycle.

            • by Kagura (843695)
              I haven't read the article. Are you saying that the battery electronically switches the cells used so that they each get the same charge/use time, like solid-state storage medium?
            • by torkus (1133985)

              Beg to differ. That's 3 cycles.

              • by Idaho (12907)

                Beg to differ. That's 3 cycles.

                No, it's not.

                See http://www.apple.com/batteries/ [apple.com] , and this is how they measure cycles for the warranty (they guarantee 80% of original capacity after 300 full charge cycles, otherwise you'll get a free replacement iirc) so I'd say that's what matters.

                If you have a MacBook, you can see your battery cycle count by typing this:


                ioreg -l | grep Cycle | cut -d= -f2

                Mine is at 52 cycles (bought it in May '08), but I'm using it 8+ hours a day. So I've owned it for 5 months, at this ra

            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              by electrictroy (912290)

              >>>Use 33% of the battery one day, recharge, 33% of the battery the next day, recharge, and 33% of the battery the next day, and recharge, and you'll bascially have used one full cycle.

              Nope. You see, batteries are a lot like dogs. If you overfeed your dog, he won't live long. If you underfeed you dog, that too can shorten his life. If you alternate between stuffing your dog full of food, and then not feeding him for a whole week until he's skin 7b ones, that too can damage him due to the stress

          • by Rei (128717)

            SCiB *is* titanate. As for what you have available, that depends on what you're buying. For laptops, yeah, I'm not aware of any alternative-tech li-ion packs. But if you're just buying cells, you can readily get phosphate and spinel cells. Better energy density than the titanates, and while not as ridiculously stable, they still blow conventional li-ion out of the water.

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by Sandbags (964742)

              The benefit of Li-Tit (SCiB) is not density, it's charge time. Li-Tit batteries reach 80+% charge in 90 seconds. Yes, some other batteries hold more charge per volume or charge per weight, but Li-Tit batteries have a MAJOR advantage in automobile use where volume is not as much of an issue as charge time.

              The Li-TiT (SCiB) batteries first of all are old news, and I don;t know why this is on /. now. It;s not only old news as far as science, it's old news as in they've been sold on the open market in large

              • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

                by Rei (128717)

                I wasn't talking about Li-Po. I was talking about two different techs -- lithium iron phosphate and the stabilized manganese-nickel (or other) spinels. These are both cathode techs, not anode; they're both paired with graphite anodes. Example manufacturers of each are A123 and LG Chem. Power densities are generally around 3kW/kg, much higher than traditional li-ion. Energy density is usually 90-110Wh/kg for cells, less for packs -- lower than traditional li-ion's ~160Wh/kg. Neither are subject to over

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by marsu_k (701360)

          Supposedly keeping the battery between 30% to 70% charge is helpful; there are utilities for this for laptops, don't know about PSP.

          Somewhat offtopic, but I've been wondering about this: my main laptop is currently also my main desktop. As such, while I run it off the battery every now and then, it's plugged in most of the time. Does this have a negative effect on the battery life? Should I use the battery more often?

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by cerberusss (660701)

            It's definitely not ideal. If you keep it in your laptop, it's going to be much warmer than room temperature (because the laptop is warm) and fully charged.

            Basically that's really bad storage. See here:

            Wikipedia on Li-ion battery life [wikipedia.org]

            To summarize the above page, it's best to store a battery a bit less than half-charged, and not above room temperature. So to preserve your battery when you really need it, take it out.

      • I've heard it said that Li-Ion batteries are typically rated for the number of full charge cycles it takes to reduce their effective capacity to 80% of what it was originally. Supposedly, partial charges effect the longevity of Li-Ion cells in a proportional manner so they handle 2x as many discharges to half capacity as they do full drains. YMMV

      • by nmos (25822)

        only 500 cycles, really? that seems a little low. do they mean that after 500 charges the battery begins to decrease in capacity, or that the battery will start to fail completely after 500 charges?

        Lithium Ion batteries start losing capacity the first time you charge them but I think the lifetime of a battery is the point where it has half of it's design capacity. FWIW 300-600 cycles really does seem to be about how long my various cell phone and laptop batteries seem to last.

      • by abdulla (523920)
        Wikipedia [wikipedia.org] says >1000, even that seems small from what I remember. I remember a Sony tech spec somewhere that said something in the few thousand.
        • You trust Sony to not over inflate the numbers?

        • by WoLpH (699064)

          Yeah but that's Sony, with Sony batteries you'll never reach the promised number because the battery will go up in flames before that ;)

          I would like to see some independent news about this battery though, 5000-6000 charges sounds great but I'll believe it when I see it. I really doubt it will be feasible to pump currents like these in a laptop. Perhaps nice for electric cars though :)

      • Re:a better link (Score:5, Informative)

        by MeepMeep (111932) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @08:09PM (#25227639)

        only 500 cycles, really? that seems a little low. do they mean that after 500 charges the battery begins to decrease in capacity, or that the battery will start to fail completely after 500 charges? because that seems really really low to me.

        i mean, most rechargeable batteries today are Li-ion batteries, right? i just wanna know how many recharges i have left on my PSP.

        does it help if you make sure to plug the battery back into the charger before it's out of charge? what can you do or not do to help preserve the capacity and life-span of a li-ion battery?

        Li-ion batteries are usually limited by 'calendar' life, not charge cycles - they start losing capacity the moment they are packaged at the factory and generally last a couple of years before they become too weak to use.

        However, there are some strategies to extend their life:

        1. Keep them cool (but not frozen)
        2. Keep them at around 40% charge

        Now, this probably isn't too useful for batteries that you are actively using - however, if you have spare lithium batteries lying around that you aren't using at the moment you might want to drain the charge to about 40% and zip them up in ziplock bags and put them in the fridge until you need to use them (check it once in a while to make sure they haven't drained to zero charge because that can kill them).

        Also, this means that you should avoid letting your Li-ion batteries get hot unnecessarily, like leaving them in a hot car in the summer.

        This is a good reference http://www.batteryuniversity.com/parttwo-34.htm [batteryuniversity.com]

        • so does this mean that keeping a rechargeable battery _fully_ charged (90~99%) is worse than keeping it at around ~40%?

          i had thought it was the constant change/fluctuation in its stored charge that wears it down (ie. going from 100% down to 0%, then back up to 100%, so on and so forth...) since these articles always talk about how many "cycles" each battery can survive. i guess i should try to learn the chemistry behind batteries.

          thanks for sharing that link. it's very informative.

        • by Rei (128717)

          They're limited by both. And any numbers or stats you've seen for "li-ion" are only applicable to traditional, LiCoO2+graphite cells.

      • There aren't set standards but typically they mean after 500 cycles you have 70% or 80% remaining and thats considered done.

        What's more important is that if they go 5000 cycles at 70% compared to 500 at 70% it doesn't matter what they are measuring to if its the same.

        Love all these new Lithium chemistry mixes.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      I respectfully suggest we should call this a "Shipstone" (obligatory Heinlein reference ("Friday")).
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Timbotronic (717458)

      I'm increasingly sceptical of EEStor. They've just signed another "worldwide exclusive" deal with a tiny company called LightEVs for all 2 and 3 wheel vehicles. The deal they did previously with Zenn covers all small to midsized cars so they've now conceeded a big chunk of their margin to a couple of nobodies. You've got to wonder - how are these companies adding value? What's their track record? Why hasn't EEStor made deals with more established manufacturers? A single working prototype which has the perfo

    • eeStor's superduperultracapacitor (...) will change the world.

      Change? Charge, you mean. :D

  • Oh Cool! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @06:45PM (#25226703)

    Will this battery explode or just burst into flames?

  • A) When can we BUY it?

    B) When can we buy it in QUANTITY for a REASONABLE PRICE?

    • Altairnano [phoenixmotorcars.com] has developed a lithium titanate battery used in the Phoenix Motorcar Sport Utility Truck that they claim fully recharges in under 10 minutes. but we'll have to wait till 2010 when the Phoenix electric SUT goes into production to see if these claims are really true.

      still, it's pretty impressive that they've made a new type of Li-ion battery [wikipedia.org] that can recharge in such a short amount of time.

  • Sounds like LiFePo4 (Score:5, Informative)

    by imsabbel (611519) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @06:48PM (#25226761)

    Well, the stats itself sound pretty much like A123 or similar cells: Lithium with an ironphosphate instead of cobalt anode material.

    They have higher cycle times, and they can be charged at up to 5C without much problems (which would agree with the 10 min stated).

    But they have a drawback: Only about half the energy density compared to normal Lithium Ions.

    Not to mention that in order to really charge them that fast, you will need a much higher rated, and thus bigger/heavier PSU brick for the notebook...

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by eebra82 (907996)

      But they have a drawback: Only about half the energy density compared to normal Lithium Ions. Not to mention that in order to really charge them that fast, you will need a much higher rated, and thus bigger/heavier PSU brick for the notebook...

      On the other hand, this is only (to become) the first commercial version of this battery. Give it a few years and we might be seeing promising things.

      Having said that, I don't think this product is directly targeting the laptop industry. For starters, as you mentioned, it requires more space. Secondly, when and if it gets commercially available for laptops, we'll be seeing fuel cell batteries as well. They offer more performance and that instant recharge factor as well.

      I think this is an excellent pro

    • half the energy density compared to normal Lithium Ions.

      Indeed. The SCIB pack used in Schwinn bicycles has an energy density of about 50 watt-hours/kg. My lithium ion (cobalt) pack: 125.

      • by myrdos2 (989497)
        I noticed the same thing - and the Wikipedia lists the energy density of lead-acid batteries as 30 to 40 Wh/kg. What makes the SCIB pack worth using? I bet it's cheaper to use lead acid batteries, even if you have to replace them more often.
      • by Rei (128717)

        Do note that this is 50Wh/kg small format. I'd expect them to get around the same ~70Wh/kg in large format that AltairNano gets. It's the same basic chemistry after all.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      So you are saying that this may charge 90% in 10 minutes, but in my new quad core dual SLI 20" laptop it will be fully discharged in 10 minutes?

      • So you are saying that this may charge 90% in 10 minutes, but in my new quad core dual SLI 20" laptop it will be fully discharged in 10 minutes?

        It means that, no, Vista will not be able to complete the booting procedure.

  • R&D in the US (Score:2, Interesting)

    by oldhack (1037484)

    I really wish more such news came out of American industries...

    Sorry to play nationalist card here. Anyway, it is what it's cracked up to be, kudos to Toshiba.

    • We do (Score:3, Interesting)

      by WindBourne (631190)
      but W and the neo-cons KILLED the majority of our long term research and throw most of it towards coming up with hi-tech close term solutions for the DOD. In essence, they shutdown a lot of long-term multi-discipline research in our universities and various companies like GE, IBM, Lucent, etc and channeled it into a number of companies (GM, L-MART, Rathyeon, Halliburton, etc).
  • Why 90% (Score:4, Interesting)

    by damn_registrars (1103043) <damn.registrars@gmail.com> on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @06:51PM (#25226791) Homepage Journal
    What is the purpose of giving us the time to charge to 90%? Is there something about the final 10% that takes longer to charge than the rest of the battery?

    Or are they charging while running - and perhaps not able to get all the way to 100%? The article was lousy (to be generous) and doesn't say what it would take to reach 100%.
    • Re:Why 90% (Score:5, Informative)

      by imsabbel (611519) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @06:56PM (#25226837)

      Yes, there is:
      Typically, the last few % take a as long as everything before together. Its just that the nature of the chemical reactions involved: During the charge, the battery voltage increases. The charger OTOH cannot push more than 4.2V (for normal batteries) respectively 3.7V for LiFePo4, in order not to damage the cells. This means that effective voltage drops during the charge, and duringe the last bits of capacity, there are only some 0.1V left. Add internal resistance, and its clear why it cannot fill up completely fast

      Other comments suggested downrating, but that doesnt really make sense: as long as you leave it in the charger, it will gain charge for a while, so the real capacity is truely higher.

    • Re:Why 90% (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Spoke (6112) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @07:03PM (#25226915)

      If you think of a battery as a bucket where the battery charge is indicated by the amount of water in the bucket.

      Now imagine that you are trying to fill that bucket as fast as possible, which means using a firehose, and that spilling any water means damaging the bucket.

      Getting the bucket close to full without making a mess is a lot easier than getting it 100% full which means you need to slow the fill down to trickle to make sure you don't over flow or splash water everywhere.

      Charging the last 10% of battery capacity is difficult because the battery does not readily accept a charge as it's nearly full. This means to get the last 10% of capacity you need to slow down the charge rate, which means that in this case, it may only take 10 minutes to get to 90% full, but it may take another 30-60 minutes to charge up that last 10% without damaging the battery.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by nobodyman (90587)

      Are you implying that the this story is a dupe? It's not really, when you read TFA's. The article from the previous slashdot story is from before Toshiba has released anything. Now the battery is out (for industrial applications), and the most recent slashdot article refers to Toshiba's laptop battery prototype.

  • by sexconker (1179573) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @07:03PM (#25226925)

    Story about battery tech + 7
    InfoWorld + 5
    "prototype" + 10
    " in just " + 15
    "Super" + 3
    A new acronym + 6
    "capable of ... compared to standard ..." + 4

    Total - 50.
    It stinks, but who knows - it may just be a fine cheese or chocolate.

    On the other hand, the Vaporware Meter is off the charts, and the "durable material" and it's claims broke the poor Economic Feasibility Meter.

  • by tuttleturtle42 (1234802) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @07:13PM (#25227019)
    Comparing to the number of cycles for a lithium ion battery doesn't make sense as lion batteries don't primarily degrade from cycling. Unlike some other battery technology, there is a major difference between the battery life when you cycle a lithium ion battery 100 times repetitively, and cycle it 100 times keeping it at 100% for a month between cycles. While the first would have degraded some, the latter could have degraded enough to be mostly dead.
  • by FriendSite.com (1208220) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @07:16PM (#25227049) Homepage
    Sony has just released a battery that goes from 90% to 0% charge in 10 minutes, but they get rather hot as a side effect
  • so whats new ? (Score:4, Informative)

    by savuporo (658486) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @07:38PM (#25227311)

    A123 LiFePO4 batteries have been charged [horizonhobby.com] at 10-15 minute rates by RC crowd for a couple years by now.

  • What the hell are people doing to Li-ion batteries that they only last 500 cycles? I have several Li-ion devices and none of them have ever needed a battery replacement after 500 cycles.
    • Perhaps a better question to ask is, "What are YOU doing (or not doing) to your Li-ion batteries so that they last for so long?"

      Consider the question asked.

      -FL

    • Re:Only 500 cycles? (Score:5, Informative)

      by pushing-robot (1037830) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @10:53PM (#25228935)

      First, that's 500 *full* cycles. Most people don't completely drain Lithium Ion batteries before recharging them.

      Second, that's not 500 cycles until the battery dies, it's 500 cycles before the battery only holds a certain percentage — usually 80% — of it's initial charge.

      What also kills Lithium Ion batteries is internal oxidation, which occurs whether the battery is cycled or not. Storing a battery at 100% charge actually causes the battery to lose life as much as five times faster than if the battery was at 50% charge. In other words, if your devices spend most of their time at less than full charge, your batteries will last longer than if you let them sit on the charger for years on end.

      Speaking of which, I wish all notebooks, MP3 players, and other gadgets gave you the ability to set a charging limit. I've only seen the feature on some Sony notebooks (they call it a "battery care" utility). If you could limit your devices to, say, a 40% charge when they're just going to be sitting around the house all day, and only charge them up to full when you really need the battery life, you'd probably never need to replace a Lithium Ion battery again.

  • More importantly, (Score:4, Insightful)

    by CSMatt (1175471) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @08:07PM (#25227623)

    How long does it take to discharge?

  • Guess what, my mp3 [sonystyle.ca] gets recharged 80% in 30minutes. This is sufficient for me. And one full charge lasts 50 hours on my mp3 player. i listen to the music on my mp3 very often and quick recharging really comes in handy. i no longer need to buy dozens of batteries each time i go to the walmart. but i wouldn't see this helping that much when it comes to power hungry laptops. my 4 year old laptop lasts less than 50mins without power. i don't think i wanna move around charging for 3minutes and work for other 40
  • by theBike45 (1006073) on Wednesday October 01, 2008 @10:16PM (#25228685)
    It's almost a given that any details about some new battery technology always avoids the negatives. Those hopeful or shilling simply avoid the bad stuff. other li ion batteries can be recharged quickly and either 1) cost a fortune and weigh a ton (Altair) or 2) diminish their lifespan by so doing. Regardless, it all comes down to cost.This article says nothing about practicality, weight, etc.

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