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The LCD Panel vs. The Crossbow 324

Posted by timothy
from the cheaper-than-a-kevlar-vest dept.
Ev!LOnE was one of several readers to point out an interesting LCD stress test: "ASUS recently came out with Asus LS201 — a TFT monitor with a protective panel made of crystal-sapphire. What I didn't imagine was the amount of punishment that thing can take. Apparently some Ukrainians shared the same concern and went for a test." Translation not necessary, but some clues about the narration would be appreciated in comments.
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The LCD Panel vs. The Crossbow

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  • DANGER! (Score:5, Funny)

    by TheMiddleRoad (1153113) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:28PM (#21817066)
    Do not use this monitor when you are frustrated. Banging your fist against the screen will result in broken fingers.
  • ordodk (2 hours ago) Show Hide Marked as spam +6 Poor comment Good comment Reply | Spam I am getting a couple of these! The last four monitors I had was pierced by crossbow bolts.
  • Blendtec (Score:5, Funny)

    by werdnapk (706357) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:31PM (#21817086)
    Will it blend?
  • hmmmm.... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by DMoylan (65079) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:32PM (#21817090)
    well if he can cock the crossbow with just his hand then it's not a very powerful crossbow. try a 90lb long bow and get back to me.

    like that monitor though. wonder if it would survive a sledge hammer to the screen. i've seen monitors taking a few punches from angry windows users.

    • A more powerful crossbow requires a winch to cock. A real crossbow would have gone completely through that piece of wood.
    • by KillerCow (213458) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:12PM (#21817322)

      well if he can cock the crossbow with just his hand then it's not a very powerful crossbow. try a 90lb long bow and get back to me.


      You must have pretty tough working conditions. We've never felt the need to put "ability to withstand 90lb long bow attack" on any of our purchasing forms.
      • by iapetus (24050)
        Really? It's pretty much compulsory round here. Ideally they should be able to withstand long bow and crossbow (proper crossbow, not the pussy one from that video) fire, and hold up well under assault with broad sword or mace. That pretty much covers the weapons we frequently have in the office. In a perfect world laptops and other field kit should be able to handle cannon and trebuchet fire as well, but those laptops tend to be a little on the pricey side.
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by russ1337 (938915)
          ummm, news flash.... you know those weapons you're talking about? the ones inside "your office" AKA - World of Warcraft? well, they cannot penetrate into the 'real world' (the one we all live in) - no matter what level Sage/Dwarf/wookie you are.


          ;-p
          • by iapetus (24050)
            I'm pretty sure those weapons are real, big, solid and fairly effective at causing damage. Is it a good sign or a bad one when the director of engineering at your company occasionally brings a sword to team meetings?
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by DMoylan (65079)
            ummm, newsflash update...

            in my office in the past year...
            * 2 sets of bows + arrows. we used to go to an archery club 2 miles away from our work place one a week before the other nerd's missus had a kid. currently trying to find a club a bit closer to my home. great fun, very relaxing. and the people you meet are fascinating.
            * 1 shotgun. boss holds a licence
            * 1 .22 rifle. boss likes to target shoot.
            * 1 air pistol. boss is an idiot who doesn't know when to stop.
            * 1 crossbow. my brother was showing the
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510)

        We've never felt the need to put "ability to withstand 90lb long bow attack" on any of our purchasing forms.
        Obviously you are not part of the military-medieval complex.
        If you were, then you would have requirements for MIL-SPEC hardware.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by SuperBanana (662181)

      well if he can cock the crossbow with just his hand then it's not a very powerful crossbow. try a 90lb long bow and get back to me.

      Try a compound crossbow and arrows that don't have wooden shafts and soft iron heads, and call me when the arrow doesn't pierce the monitor, punch through the wall behind it, and impale itself in a marketing intern.

      It is pretty impressive that he can pound on it with a hammer, even lightly- that's far better than anything else...buuuuuut there were a lot of things going for

      • by DMoylan (65079)
        a compound bow? well i have seen a person shooting a target and knocking over the target stand. it was a huge compund bow and he was not a small person. he used blunt arrows as they only went half way through the target block and could be extracted. sharper arrows went all the way through and ripped the fletches off the arrows. something like that would penetrate any personal armour currently available. that monitor wouldn't even slow the arrow down.

        i don't think that much more power is needed to dam
        • I agree about the power of a typical longbow, or a typical crossbow. Compound bows are wonderful, but expensive and difficult to maintain in the field, so they're not a combat weapon.

          There was a fascinating NPR special about the longbow versus plate armor claims. English longbows, according to modern tests of the soft iron used for their heads and tested against plate iron similar to that of plate armor, simply bent the tip and was deflected. What the arrows *did* do was go easily through chain, leather, un
          • by DMoylan (65079)
            > Compound bows are wonderful, but expensive and difficult to maintain in the field, so they're not a combat weapon.

            i prefer traditional bows myself. simpler purer somehow. compunds are definitely more difficult to maintain (when a string snapped on a compound near me i thought it was louder than a gun shot) but the guy who trained me was in the irish army and when i asked he said that different special forces around the world still occasionly use bows for their ability to silently deliver either an ar
      • call me when the arrow doesn't pierce the monitor, punch through the wall behind it, and impale itself in a marketing intern.

        Well I did it, but I missed the marketing intern - I think the monitor knocked the arrow off course. Any pointers?
    • by TheMiddleRoad (1153113) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:39PM (#21817460)
      Yeah! What kind of weak-ass monitor can only take a couple hits from a 90lb pull crossbow? Shit, I hit my LCD with a 280b pull all the time. Just the other day, I put ten rounds with my 9mm into it. It's still standing! I put a youtube up of it. 50,000,000 hits in two hours. SUCK IT DOWN!
    • or maybe he just has really strong hands?

      the world will never know...

  • if only... (Score:5, Funny)

    by MarkRose (820682) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:34PM (#21817104) Homepage
    I'm sure Big Blue would have love it [wikipedia.org]!
  • I am in AWE (Score:5, Interesting)

    by retiredtwice (1128097) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:35PM (#21817110)
    While that left me agape, I keep having visions of police with these things strapped on the front and back flashing subliminal messages and doubling as bulletproof vests.

    I do wonder how they do against a bullet (slow bullet like an ordinary 38), maybe you need to double them ...
    • Re:I am in AWE (Score:5, Interesting)

      by kypper (446750) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:12PM (#21817320)
      It would be cooler to have mini video cameras on the back of the cop routed to the chest monitor so that it looked like you were looking right through him. In dark lighting that could be really interesting.
      • It would be cooler to have mini video cameras on the back of the cop routed to the chest monitor so that it looked like you were looking right through him. In dark lighting that could be really interesting.

        Assuming you were standing in precisely the right spot to see in line with the camera's vision, yes, it would be convincing. Otherwise it would look like a guy with a TV on his chest, and draw even more attention than no display at all.

        Unless the system can project a different image in every direction, t
        • by Bandman (86149)
          At the risk of giving ideas to people who don't need them....

          How hard would it be to flash patterns that flickered at a rate known to give seizures, and just give the police forces polarized glasses to field them out.

          Even coordinating a moving pattern among multiple units could be very distracting and make it hard to attack an individual. Three lines of police officers covered in LCDs that just display the classic "static" would be very effective camouflage from attackers on the ground.
          • Well as far as I know (not being a seizure expert) there is no rate which will cause seizures in everyone, and besides that would probably be deemed illegal somewhere along the way. Much better to program in some moving image so that the police look like they're moving when they're standing still, that would make the primary threat to bullet proof armor (high caliber long range rifle) hard to use.

            There are way to many interesting applications for something like this...
  • by ILuvRamen (1026668) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:37PM (#21817124)
    I'm gonna build one with a built in crossbow so the user knows if they shoot at it, it'll return fire. That will prevent the user from damaging it in the first place. Don't build tough, build smart lol.
  • Hard core! (Score:5, Funny)

    by fedx (549787) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:48PM (#21817190)
    In most offices I've worked in your monitor just has to withstand NERF darts and the occasional hacky-sack attack. I take it Ukranian office wars are a little bit more serious with their choice of weapons.
  • Good but.. (Score:4, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @06:50PM (#21817198)
    It's no titanium. Or is it? :)
  • I guess we learn something everyday. Most crystals I have worked with cleave, so I thought, how is this possible. The arrow will at least cleave the sapphire. But aluminum oxide, apparently, does not cleave. Cool. Now I understand why it is used for so many things.

    I agree with other comments that it seemed like a pretty lame cross bow, and I wonder of which material the tip is made. It looked soft. It is still a good lesson on the strength of single crystals.

  • I don't get it (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dangitman (862676) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:00PM (#21817262)
    They make a nice monitor, with expensive materials, and then they put it on a shoddy non-tilting stand? WTF? What an insane world we live in. Why the hell does anybody even make non-tilting display stands?
    • Re:I don't get it (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Lumpy (12016) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:24PM (#21817386) Homepage
      Because most of us don't use a stand if you get a high end monitor. I use monitor arms, I could not even imagine wasting desk space with the stands let alone having to suffer with looking at them that low.

      People blow $599.00 on a "premium" LCD monitor and then bitch about paying $199.00 for a decent arm that will outlast 12 monitors and give you real freedom. Hell get decent LCD arm and the speakers are even off the desk mounted off the arms as well.
      • Re:I don't get it (Score:4, Insightful)

        by dangitman (862676) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @08:21PM (#21817646)

        Because most of us don't use a stand if you get a high end monitor. I use monitor arms,

        I think you're kidding yourself if you think that most people do this, even most purchasers of a "high end" monitor. It is a distinctly minority item, even among high-end purchases. Personally, I do use a monitor arm in my office, but I'm one of the very few. And there are plenty of situations where a monitor arm isn't feasible or practical.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by sheldon (2322)
      That's the nice thing about LCDs... There is a standard mount, and you can buy any stand you want.
      • by dangitman (862676)
        That has two problems - you have to spend more money, when they could have simply added a hinge for very little cost, that would suit most users fine. The other problem is the waste involved in throwing away more plastic because the display is shipped with an inferior (and often unusable) stand. We already throw away enough plastic crap, why add to that mountain?
  • by caferace (442) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:05PM (#21817286) Homepage
    http://crave.cnet.co.uk/monitors/0,39029456,49290999,00.htm [cnet.co.uk]

    One such product is the Asus LS201 -- a TFT monitor with a protective panel made of crystal-sapphire. Our Asus rep says not only is it scratch-proof, but it's also 'punch-proof'. We were dared to hit it as hard as we could and told it wouldn't break.

    Never ones to shirk from a challenge, we formed an orderly queue and gleefully punched the hell out of our first LS201 sample. Unfortunately one of our punchers was wearing a ring, and the offending jewellery left a 2cm scratch on the supposedly scratch-proof monitor.

    Asus sent us a replacement and politely asked us to remove any jewellery before we let rip. We duly obliged, but instead of emerging unscathed, the LS201 developed a small, unidentifiable blemish below the protective panel. It wasn't a scratch or a dent -- it looked more like a small piece of fluff.

    Our verdict: the LS201 will not shatter into a million pieces when punched (don't try this at home). It's therefore ideal if you're the type of person who likes to attack inanimate objects, or just drop blameless pieces of technology. But it's most definitely not scratch-proof -- we don't care what the stickers say.

  • Not too surprising (Score:5, Interesting)

    by the eric conspiracy (20178) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:05PM (#21817288)
    During the Vietnam war some US helicopters were using synthetic sapphire crystals for bullet-proof windows.

    It's nice they have gotten the process cheap enough for LCD screens. Definitely won't scratch when you clean it with ordinary cleaners.

  • The Box O' Truth !!! [theboxotruth.com]

    Heck, if they can test ammo penetration on books, frozen clothing and bread, why not this monitor?

  • ... as far as I could bribe them.
  • by Animats (122034) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:27PM (#21817402) Homepage

    That kind of toughness makes real sense in expensive mobile devices. I was surprised that the iPhone didn't come with a sapphire or diamond screen.

    This isn't exotic technology today. The typical supermarket checkout scanner uses sapphire [seamarkinternational.com] or diamond [diamonex.com] coating on the glass. That's why it can survive years of canned goods (and, for Home Depot, hand tools) being scraped across the scanner. In the checkout scanner world, plain glass lasts 2-4 weeks. For diamond, the makers claim 9 years. The sapphire vendor offers a lifetime warranty.

  • It'll take all the fun out of Call of Duty 5 if they model the monitors after those.

    It's fun shooting the monitors while the sarge is talking...
  • Translation (Score:5, Informative)

    by Strange Quark Star (1157447) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:40PM (#21817462)
    First, it's Russian he is speaking, despite the commercial being Ukrainian. The only thing worth translating he says at about 1:00 : "The thing is, that the coating of the monitor is out of the ordinary. In theory, it should withstand extreme stress, some even say it is bullet-proof. That's exactly what we wanted to check. The monitor has survived the shoot, but since the manufacturer gave it to us for tearing apart, we decided to literally kill it. For this we have a crossbow and crossbow arrows." In the end he concludes that this is probably the most resilient monitor in the world.
  • Listen up, Lenovo! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by n1hilist (997601) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:47PM (#21817494)
    .. and put this tech into the next Thinkpad! .. with LED backlighting, kthnx
  • by Blancmange (195140) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @07:57PM (#21817540)
    Ship it across the United States and back using FedEx, in a cardboard box marked "Fragile."
  • by UncHellMatt (790153) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @08:40PM (#21817730)
    I found a book of simple Russian phrases to try and figure out that video. It seems that the announcer's record is scratched, and his hovercraft is full of eels. ...bouncy bouncy.
  • built a gaming PC for a guy who had serious anger management issues. Caught him punching his CRT once. Lucky he hasn't busted it yet.

    Side note - That was a REALLY cheesy arrangement of Mason William's "Classical Gas" in the background. Sounds much better with classical guitar leading it.

  • by dynamo (6127) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @09:18PM (#21817926) Journal
    I just have to know -- Will It Blend?
  • by sakdoctor (1087155) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @09:22PM (#21817946) Homepage
    Sapphire is actually transparent aluminium ... er, well aluminium oxide anyway.
    Just as good for transporting whales I assure you.
  • I could see this as part of an Apple "Toughbook". I'd buy one in a nanosecond.
  • crossbow+1 (Score:4, Funny)

    by bumby (589283) on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @10:10PM (#21818178)
    Resisting a normal arrow from a crossbow is nice and all, but how does it handle a fire arrow from a crassbow+1?
  • by DragonTHC (208439) <DragonNO@SPAMgamerslastwill.com> on Tuesday December 25, 2007 @10:34PM (#21818312) Homepage Journal
    I'll just aim my crossbow for the fleshy part in front of the monitor. problem solved! ;p
  • by flyingfsck (986395) on Wednesday December 26, 2007 @02:59AM (#21819586)
    Sapphire is the infamous Star Trek 'transparent aluminium', but it comes in many colours, from transparent to blue, pink or red (ruby).

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