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Wind Power Is Now The Cheapest Energy In India (bloombergquint.com) 54

An anonymous reader shares a report: Wind power prices fell to its lowest and below the cheapest solar tariffs in the fourth round of auctions, putting more pressure on turbine makers as developers are expected to negotiate already-falling equipment prices. State-run Gujarat Urja Vikas Nigam Ltd. auctioned 500-megawatt of grid-connected projects at as low as Rs 2.43 (3.8 cents) a unit. That was quoted by Actis-backed Sprng Energy that bid for 197.5-megawatt capacity and KP Energy that won 30 MW. That's lower than the lowest solar power tariffs of Rs 2.44 a unit discovered in May and 8 percent lower than wind power prices discovered in earlier national auctions in October, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. A decline in auction tariffs will put the manufacturers under even more pressure to innovate and meet the price expectations of developers, Bloomberg New Energy Finance said. Falling tariffs may lead to discovery of even lower bids in the national wind auctions scheduled for January, it added. India aims to auction 28-gigawatt wind projects by March 2020 to take it closer to the total targeted capacity of 60 GW by 2022. That's part of the plan to install 175 GW renewable energy capacity by 2022.
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Wind Power Is Now The Cheapest Energy In India

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  • If I'm reading this correct, it reads as if the issue is the utility is paying less for wind power, which may or may not mean the cost of generation is lowest, but not necessarily...

  • For something to be "the cheapest" in India.
  • Attractive margins come and go. Get your ideal wind-farm location while supplies last!

    By the way, the correct measure is delivered wattage, after subtracting out transmission loss. How much is your transmission loss? Well, that depends on the flow patterns of the existing grid. Ideally you would add the new generation source, subtract out the displaced generation sources, then calculate the marginal delivery loss in the system as a whole, to isolate the marginal term associated with one project.

    Unfortun

    • By the way, the correct measure is delivered wattage, after subtracting out transmission loss. How much is your transmission loss?
      The transmission loss is the same as for: coal, nuclear, water, solar, biogas etc.
      So why do you care? And in a typical grid it is 5% - 7% of the transported energy ... you could have googled that.

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