Follow Slashdot blog updates by subscribing to our blog RSS feed

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Iphone Cellphones Power Apple Hardware Technology

iFixit's iPhone X Teardown Reveals Two Battery Cells, 'Unprecedented' Logic Board (macrumors.com) 89

iFixit has posted its teardown of the iPhone X, revealing a new TrueDepth camera system, stacked logic board, L-shaped two-cell battery pack, and Qi-based inductive charging coil. Mac Rumors reports: Like every other model since the iPhone 7 Plus, the iPhone X is a sideways-opening device. A single bracket covers every logic board connector. iFixit said the miniaturized logic board design is incredibly space efficient, with an unprecedented density of connectors and components. It noted the iPhone X logic board is about 70 percent of the size of the iPhone 8 Plus logic board. The extra room allows for a new L-shaped two-cell battery pack rated for 2,716 mAh, which is slightly larger than the iPhone 8 Plus battery. iFixit's teardown includes some high-resolution photos of the iPhone X's new TrueDepth camera system that powers Face ID and Animoji. For those unfamiliar, a flood illuminator covers your face with infrared light. Next, the front-facing camera confirms a face. Then the IR dot projector projects a grid of dots over your face to create a three-dimensional map. Last, the infrared camera reads this map and sends the data to the iPhone X for authentication. Like the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, the inside of the iPhone X's rear shell is affixed with an inductive charging coil based on the Qi standard. iFixit gave the iPhone X a so-called repairability score of six out of a possible 10 points. It said a cracked display can be replaced without removing Face ID's biometric hardware, but it added that fussy cables tie unrelated components together into complex assemblies that are expensive and troublesome to replace.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

iFixit's iPhone X Teardown Reveals Two Battery Cells, 'Unprecedented' Logic Board

Comments Filter:
  • Wow (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday November 03, 2017 @07:29PM (#55486687)

    Iâ(TM)m an EE and Engineering Design Firm owner with over 20 years of experience and 200+ Leading Edge Wireless Cellular/WiFi/Microwave/Satcom Product designs under my belt and I have to say WOW. This is very, very impressive. They would have spent months on the PCB design alone! Applause to Appleâ(TM)s Engineers!

    • Re:Wow (Score:5, Funny)

      by 110010001000 ( 697113 ) on Friday November 03, 2017 @07:46PM (#55486785) Homepage Journal
      It is very Impressive that an esteemed industry leader like you Would Randomly capitalize Words. Are you an expert on Host Files too?
    • Re:Wow (Score:4, Interesting)

      by ShanghaiBill ( 739463 ) on Friday November 03, 2017 @07:57PM (#55486835)

      I agree that the engineering is impressive. TFA shows the front of the PCB, and here is the back [wefixitservices.com]. More than half the real estate is covered in BGAs. Anyone know how many layers were used? It even looks like it has a removable battery.

      My wife has one on order, but, alas, I don't think she will let me disassemble it.

      • https://www.theregister.co.uk/... [theregister.co.uk]

        Apple is the first to market with new, dense circuit board design called Stacked SLP, often referred to misleadingly as a "stacked logic board". Today's phones use 10 layers of copper on the PCB. Stacked SLP uses 20. This permits for a higher density of components in a given surface area. The iPhone X had also been tipped to have a 10-layer AP board, eight-layer RF board and two layers of interposers.

        Even The Register is impressed. That must mean something.

        • amazing that it got a 6 out of 10 for "repairabilty". The trend seems to be with tech that the newer (thinner) models are less and less repairable.
        • We had taken on a project that another company dropped the ball on. It was designed with a PCB that had a 6- layer and an 8-layer PCB stuck together. It became a production and QA nightmare as it would warp. When they say they are first with this technology, I immediately thought, "Uh oh, they're going to run into so many unexpected issues". I wonder how 20-layers will handle frequent bending and flexing. I assume they've done the drop tests and passed, as well as self interference. So hard to ensure you'
          • I'll just assume that it helps to have a multi-billion dollar research budget...

            Bringing this to a prototype-stage is one thing - getting it into volume-production is something completely different.

            Does Foxconn also make the PCBs - or do they just assemble them?

      • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

        I wonder how robust the board will be with those large BGA packages on it.

        We have already seen some models falling when stressed by bending as the large ICs come away from the PCB. Samsung had that issue years ago and solved it by switching to smaller packages, and making their phones less bendy.

    • But do you earn $50,000 a year in Silicon Valley?

      • by Tuidjy ( 321055 )

        Can you survive on $50,000 per year in Silicon Valley? I've got single friends who complain about surviving on $80,000.

    • This is very, very impressive.

      I have to agree. I happily shit on Apple every chance I get, but the main PCB sandwich gave me a huge metaphorical (and partially literal) stiffy.

  • It's still a phone to me, like every other phone.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      It has unprecedented density of connectors and components, all for only $1,000+. Does your phone have that?
      • Re:yawn (Score:5, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday November 03, 2017 @07:52PM (#55486819)

        Mine has a headphone jack.

        • You lack courage. I am courageous enough to pay $1,000+ for a phone with a headphone jack.
        • Mine has a cassette player!
  • by PPH ( 736903 )

    Stand by for my Western Electric 2500DM teardown.

    • by Misagon ( 1135 )

      I love the two-tone design of the 2500 DM, especially on the beige variant but the two-tone green looks great as well.
      I wish though that the buttons were not all grey but followed the overall design of the device.

      A big plus however that the buttons are double-shot moulded thick ABS and not some cheap pad-printed crap like on low-end phones -- or with no legends at all like some company that used to make good computers.

      • by Megane ( 129182 )
        The best color for the WE2500 is red, harkening back to the cold war days, when red phones were used for direct communication lines to rival government leaders. How about a nice game of chess?
        • I am saddened that my 2500 sets are now, for the moment, unusable in my home. I need to find an affordable VOIP solution to plug my entire house full of extension phones into so I can restore the 2500 sets' use. CenturyLink can rot in hell, of course.

        • by PPH ( 736903 )

          when red phones were used for direct communication lines to rival government leaders

          In mythology and the movies only. The actual 'red phone' was a teletype.

          On a related note: Many years ago, I helped a friend wire in an extension phone. On the little paper tag for the phone number, I wrote "KREMLIN HOTLINE" (with a backwards R). It remains there to this day.

    • Please do one. I haven't seen one of those in years, but I think the last one I saw I did dissemble.

    • I'm going to wait for a serious internals review. Like "will it blend?".

      • by Megane ( 129182 )
        A Western Electronics product is one of the few things I would not be sure that it could blend.
  • I'm a bit intrigued by the sandwiched logic board using a thick PCB perimeter outline board with vias to connect the top and bottom boards. I wonder how well it will hold up to abuse without any of them desoldering. The X-ray pics sure are nice, wish I had one in my lab.
  • With the fluff stripped, still impossible to repair sensibly and still a battery you can't replace.

    • by hey! ( 33014 )

      Getting at the battery doesn't look so bad. Clearly it's not supposed to be user serviceable, but it *is* serviceable without serious risk of damaging the phone.

      • Getting at the battery doesn't look so bad. Clearly it's not supposed to be user serviceable, but it *is* serviceable without serious risk of damaging the phone.

        Your right. Sometimes one needs to hard boot a phone by removing the battery, it takes me 14 screws just to see it. https://d3nevzfk7ii3be.cloudfr... [cloudfront.net] (Pix used by Ifixit.com). I'm not a happy camper.

        • by Dog-Cow ( 21281 )

          I've never had that experience with an iPhone, and I've used most models for development work, which tends to do the screwiest things to devices. Perhaps you should be using a better class of phone, if that's really a problem for you.

          • I've never had that experience with an iPhone, and I've used most models for development work, which tends to do the screwiest things to devices. Perhaps you should be using a better class of phone, if that's really a problem for you.

            Misspoke, a hard reset not a reboot.

            Right now my phone has lost showing the time out of the pocket, a hard reset or to turn off and remove the battery for awhile would fix that. Never owned an Apple phone.

      • In theory, yes. In practice, does the system detect the change and brick the phone if it's not been done by a techpriest that has been blessed by the Adeptus Mechanicus?

Neutrinos have bad breadth.

Working...