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Power Transportation Technology

Hyundai To Build a 300-Mile-Per-Charge Electric Car (reuters.com) 177

On Thursday, Hyundai Motor said it will launch a long-range electric vehicle with a driving range of 500 km (311 miles) per charge after 2021. The company is reportedly planning 31 eco-friendly models by 2020, up from a previously flagged 28. Reuters reports: The South Korean automaker is planning to launch an electric sedan under its high-end Genesis brand in 2021 with a range of 500 km (310 miles) per charge. It will also introduce an electric version of its Kona small sport utility vehicle (SUV) with a range of 390 km in the first half of next year. The automaker and affiliate Kia Motors Corp, which together rank fifth in global vehicle sales, also said they were adding three plug-in vehicles to their plans for eco-friendly cars, bringing the total to 31 models by 2020. Underscoring Hyundai's electric shift, those plans include eight battery-powered and two fuel-cell vehicles -- a contrast to its 2014 announcement for 22 models, of which only two were slated to be battery-powered. Hyundai also confirmed a Reuters report that it is developing its first dedicated electric vehicle platform, which will allow the company to produce multiple models with longer driving ranges.
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Hyundai To Build a 300-Mile-Per-Charge Electric Car

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  • by Gravis Zero ( 934156 ) on Friday August 18, 2017 @10:14PM (#55045903)

    They are relying on the recent advancement in lithium battery technology (that enables solid state storage at a higher density) to reduce the cost of batteries for their cars since they will be able to get that same range with fewer batteries. I would expect to see Tesla putting out cars with double what Hyundai is quoting on their base models long before 2021.

    • by Cyberax ( 705495 )
      Tesla already produces Model 3 with 310 mile range and top Model S has 346 miles.
      • I would expect to see Tesla putting out cars with double what Hyundai is quoting on their base models long before 2021.

        reading is fundamental.

    • It is going to be interesting to see how flexible the gigafactory is. Battery tech is evolving fast and I wonder what portion of the investment will be lost in retooling lines to majorly different new chemistries. Tesla could be in danger from too much early lock-in - depends on to what degree they've planned for it.
      • Actually, battery tech is evolving slowly... but in a lot of different directions. Seriously, only one thing changed in this latest iteration of lithium batteries. Also, considering that Tesla is actually designing their own manufacturing equipment, I don't think there is any problem with lock-ins.

        • "one thing changed" is not a great method of measuring improvement.

          Batteries are improving energy density at a rate of 14% per annum. That's a doubling time of 7 years.

          That improvement can either mean longer ranges, or lighter, cheaper EVs.

  • The headline is over an electric car that has the same range as a gasoline car since... forever? Not impressed.

    Later in that article though is a bit about how hydrogen fuel cells might come to market. I think that hydrogen as a fuel is a terrible idea but the idea that a fuel cell might be cheap and durable enough for a passenger car would be news.

    Electric cars and hydrogen fuel cells are all about the supposed "addiction" to fossil fuels, and the damage it may (or may not) be doing to the environment. T

    • You're free because you don't have anything anybody wants.

    • Oh, and NUCLEAR BAD!! Because strip mining the planet for rare earth metals to make windmills, batteries, and solar panels has NO IMPACT on the environment.
      How often do I need to tell you:
      a) rare earths are not rare, it just a name. If you honour regulations it is no problem mining them
      b) the only rare earth for windmills is Niob, used for magnets which is waste product in iron mining
      c) 99% of all solar panels don't use rare earth metals

      Get a damn clue and stop repeating the same myths over and over again.

      • rare earths are not rare, it just a name.

        Did I say they were rare? I said they had to be mined. Wind power takes a lot of resources, ten times as much as coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Very few talk about that. Not just rare earth elements but also steel, copper, and so on.

        If you honour regulations it is no problem mining them

        If you follow the laws of the USA mining rare earth elements means it is prohibitively expensive. Thorium is a byproduct of rare earth mining and US federal law considers this "weapon grade material" and has to be handled as if it is high grade plutonium, even though it's w

        • You are definitley an idiot.
          Thorium is useable for nuclear reactors, but freshly mined thorium is in no way weapon grade.

          If you have bollocks laws in the USA, then change them, but stop claiming that renewable energy sources need rare earth elements. They don't.

          Repeating that in dozens of posts since months: that is a lie.

          • You are definitley an idiot.

            You are correct. I am an idiot for trying to argue with you. You apparently are arguing with the voice in your head and not anything I wrote.

    • Electric cars and hydrogen fuel cells are all about the supposed "addiction" to fossil fuels, and the damage it may (or may not) be doing to the environment. There is nothing inherently wrong with the internal combustion engine.

      Uh, no. The internal combustion engine is fundamentally flawed. It's a heat engine that intentionally throws away all of the heat it generates. It has a torque curve that is so mismatched against the task of providing motive force that it's laughable. The very fact that the automotive shifting transmission even exists is proof that the internal combustion engine is not fit for purpose. It has the concept of idling, meaning it's turning over, wasting power, even while the vehicle is stopped. Even when

  • ICE cars are better at some things and EV cards are better at other things. Apparently there are a lot of people around that think this makes EVs are worthless, not viable, a waste of time and purchased only by easily duped starry-eyed fanboys.

  • Is anyone making a reasonably affordable four-wheel-drive electric (or "range-extended electric" a la Chevy Volt) vehicle?

    My Toyota Yaris ought to have another hundred thousand miles left in it, but when it dies I'd like to go electric. I've also taken a job in Snowsville, USA, and between that and my fondness for the outdoors may look into getting a 4WD car.

    • Is anyone making a reasonably affordable four-wheel-drive electric (or "range-extended electric" a la Chevy Volt) vehicle?

      The Tesla Model 3 will be available in four wheel drive next year. They'll probably only make that feature available together with an expanded battery pack, so it will probably cost ~$45,000. You'll have to decide for yourself if that's affordable to you.

    • Not sure if you consider this "reasonably affordable" or not, but the Tesla Model 3 will have an All-Wheel Drive option available once they finish ramping up their production line.

      But people say that the traction control in Teslas is so well done there are no issues driving a rear-wheel drive version in the snow.
  • I hope all these vehicles use Tesla's freely licensed charging technologies so the recharging stations will be compatible with each other.
  • Be aware that their range drops much faster when being driven over 65mph than that of gasoline vehicles. And there are lots of highways with speed limits over 65mph.

    Fast but legal driving (80mph) reduces an Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) car by about 10%. It reduces electric vehicles by about 30%. Range on electric cars goes up when driven slower (not so much on ICE cars).

    However- for 95% of car trips are under 20 miles. and even for the longer trips, almost all daily commutes are under 40 miles each

  • Never have understood why the batteries can not be modular, allowing me to add more (at the expense of trunk space, backseat, whatever) as I see fit.
  • Or minivans?
    Yeah, it's a European thing.

    But estates are far more practical than SUVs, IMO.

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