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Tesla's Highly-Anticipated Solar Roofs Go Up For Pre-Order Today (inhabitat.com) 143

Kristine Lofgren writes: Get ready: Tesla's ground-breaking Solar Roof tiles are available for order in the U.S. starting today. In typical fashion, CEO Elon Musk announced via Twitter that the anticipated tech would be available to order this afternoon with installation happening later this year. Tesla's tiles look like traditional roof tiles but they soak up all that delicious sunlight in order to power your home. According to the company, the tiles will be more affordable than typical roofing and can be paired with their Powerwall battery to power a home completely using solar energy.
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Tesla's Highly-Anticipated Solar Roofs Go Up For Pre-Order Today

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  • that's not her real name, is it?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      It's a Tangerine Dream album I think.

    • As far as I know Sunlight® is a registered trademark of The Sun Products Corporation.

    • <Homer>
      Mmmmmm, sunlight...
      </Homer>
  • Who the hell... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by x0ra ( 1249540 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @05:21PM (#54396425)
    ... would sink USD$70 for a roof ? He's mentioning that it wouldn't cost more than an asphalt roof, but that's only assuming very optimistic energy savings, and government subsidiary. Quote I got for my roof are in the $5k range, for a 20 years lifetime. The tiles are only warranty over 30 years, so an asphalt roof would cost $7.5k over the same period of time...
    • by kuzb ( 724081 )
      It's just Elon doing what he does best. Creating novelty items for rich people.
      • Re:Who the hell... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Jeremi ( 14640 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @05:48PM (#54396591) Homepage

        It's just Elon doing what he does best. Creating novelty items for rich people.

        Didn't almost every new technology start out as a novelty item for rich people?

        • Didn't almost every new technology start out as a novelty item for rich people?

          No.

        • Didn't almost every new technology start out as a novelty item for rich people?

          If you consider the military as such.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          Nope. The Tamagotchi started out as a novelty item for annoying people.

      • Agreed. Obviously x0ra has never been to Spencer Gifts.
      • It's just Elon doing what he does best. Creating novelty items for rich people.

        And this is bad because...?

        I mean, almost everything technology-wise was at some point a novelty for the rich (until the cost of production went down enough for the hoi polloi to get them.)

        Best examples? Books. Trained horses. Full body armor. Water pumps. Cell phones and computers. And the list goes on and one.

        • It's just Elon doing what he does best. Creating novelty items for rich people.

          And this is bad because...?

          I mean, almost everything technology-wise was at some point a novelty for the rich (until the cost of production went down enough for the hoi polloi to get them.)

          Best examples? Books. Trained horses. Full body armor. Water pumps. Cell phones and computers. And the list goes on and one.

          I mean, if I could double my salary, I would indulge in these new solar panels. But I can't, so I won't. My salary is good, but not that good.

          With that said, there are plenty of people that make double than what you or I make, who will be early adopters. And from that, better, cheaper versions will come till the day they are as ubiquitous as today's shingles.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You've misread the information, the roof tiles themselves have a warranty somewhere around the heat death of the universe, the power generation warranty is what is 30 years. Even if the tiles one day stop making electricity entirely they will still be fully warrantied roofing.

      • by PIBM ( 588930 )

        No, they are not. They are only warranted for 30 years against water leakage, which is the reason roof tile are replaced in the first place. Which places them at a lower warranty point than my current roof tiles (35 years), at a much higher price. 9 years ago I paid 5K CAD, and Tesla is quoting a similarly sized roof at 43K USD, not including the powerwall & ondulator. They aren't providing the information about how much energy their tiles deliver anywhere I could find either, but I was also under the i

        • Nowhere can I save that amount of money from the energy saved :\

          Unless you live in Hawaii, where the sun is brighter and power costs 4 times the mainland rate.

        • by Anonymous Coward
          Oh, I see the problem. He was comparing it to the price of his solid gold tile roof.
        • You would be amazed at how much money I lost by converting from Oil to Natural gas with an ultra efficient furnace, and insulating the heck out of the house. Paid off in only a few years. Gotta be a lie, right? There are many people I know who spend a month what I spend a year.

          Even made money selling the old oil furnace - it was a good one - to the guys who installed thegas one.

          So why am I telling you this shit? Because I heard the same arguments from people about that as you are giving us here, that'

          • by PIBM ( 588930 )

            Oh, I've had my house inspected, air loss calculated, the small 30 square inch loss was reduced as much as it could be, insulation is as good as it get (triple pane glass with dual refraction covers), window covering in use in winter, energy efficient light bulbs, dimmers, very high quality and efficiency thermal pump for heating the house in the winter, yet I still manage to use over 62MWh a year. If natural gaz had been available it would have been my heating choice, alas it isn't available in my area. Oh

          • by Lehk228 ( 705449 )
            I'm not doing efficiency upgrades, my house is 100 years old and my heat+light bill never went above 175 over the winter, and it's often under 100 during mild weather. when the furnace craps out, I'll put in a reasonably efficient one, but I can save a lot more money and fuel by knocking down the thermostat and putting on a sweater than I can with fancy new equipment and ripping up my walls to install new insulation.
            • I'm not doing efficiency upgrades, my house is 100 years old and my heat+light bill never went above 175 over the winter, and it's often under 100 during mild weather. when the furnace craps out, I'll put in a reasonably efficient one, but I can save a lot more money and fuel by knocking down the thermostat and putting on a sweater than I can with fancy new equipment and ripping up my walls to install new insulation.

              One thing I should note is that the things I did were not done at one time, and the initiating project was not all about energy savings. The house was re-sided in order to have a maintenance free vinyl miledew resisting surface, so it gets another layer of insulation. The wife wanted something cleaner than oil heat, and they were extending the gas lines past our street, and we got free install since it was easier for them to do that work while the main line was uncovered. Hell, they even replaced some unev

          • You would be amazed at how much money I lost by converting from Oil to Natural gas with an ultra efficient furnace

            You mean SAVED and not lost, right? or else you're being sarcastic?

            • You would be amazed at how much money I lost by converting from Oil to Natural gas with an ultra efficient furnace

              You mean SAVED and not lost, right? or else you're being sarcastic?

              Sarcasm. I dip into that occasionally when I shouldn't.

          • I live in COlorado which is one of the hail capitals in America.
            We have replaced the roof 2x in 8 or 10 years.
            Come the next hail storm where we lose our hail resistant shingles again, we will replace with this.
          • by PIBM ( 588930 )

            Stop drinking the coolaid, read the fine prints on the tesla solarroof website. 30 years warranty against infiltrations, which is less than good asphalt shingles costing less than half the price of the non-solar tiles.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I believe he said it would cost the same as an asphalt roof with a solar panel installation. The price I saw was 50K for the roof and a battery backup for night time use after government rebates. That isn't far off what an asphalt roof, a similar sized solar installation and a battery wall would cost. It is a bit more, but not as much as I thought it'd be.

    • Re: Who the hell... (Score:4, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @05:42PM (#54396553)

      The site quoted me 33K for the roof and 7K for the battery, with 18K worth of electricity generated over 30 years and a 9K tax credit for a net cost of about 13K over thirty years.

      I'm actually in the market for a roof replacement in the next two years, and I'm interested in solar. I have a small house. An asphalt roof replacement is less than four grand.

      This offer is a complete non-starter for me.

      • by Mr D from 63 ( 3395377 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @06:21PM (#54396759)

        The site quoted me 33K for the roof and 7K for the battery, with 18K worth of electricity generated over 30 years and a 9K tax credit for a net cost of about 13K over thirty years.

        I'm actually in the market for a roof replacement in the next two years, and I'm interested in solar. I have a small house. An asphalt roof replacement is less than four grand.

        This offer is a complete non-starter for me.

        This is where I have a problem. Uber expensive solar roofs should not qualify for tax credits. At least not beyond the amount that would be given for traditional PV panels of the same capacity. Its bad enough that most of these credits are simply helping pay power bills for the wealthy, but now we pay for their roofs as well? Meanwhile low income people have no access to these gifts.

        We should take all the PV tax credits and provide public schools with PV panels. That way we add PV capacity and help lower school energy bills, good for people of all income levels.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Ah yes, the classic American leftist moral dilemma.
          Saving Gaia vs. screwing the rich.

          Do we make alternative energy more attractive to end users by subsidizing it, or say 'screw the rich' and cancel subsidies so the ones who can afford the steep cost of alternative energy will have to pay full freight to feel like they're helping the environment.

          What a heartwrenching choice it must be...

          • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

            by Anonymous Coward

            When subsidized energy comes with subsidized roofing, its not a hard choice at all. Just have some limits.

          • Do we make alternative energy more attractive to end users by subsidizing it

            No we should not. Unless alternative energy is ACTUALLY COST EFFECTIVE it will not scale, and will not be a significant part of the solution. Subsidizing bad technology just means that you get more bad technology, and you divert research dollars and talent away from the search for something that actually works.

            The money spent on subsidies should be spent on R&D instead.

            • by dbIII ( 701233 )
              You may have had a point in 1970 but I doubt it.
              Now we have an entire generation hitting the workforce that have no doubt that it "actually works" because it's been working since before they were born.
              I really don't get what you are trying to do here.
            • LOL.
              Sorry bill, but you have this one wrong. Due to net metering, the wind generators are now cheaper than coal WITHOUT net metering. And with the new wind generators (10 MW and bigger up to 20 MW), these will be cheaper than everything, except for geo-thermal (which has the lowest costs going).
              Solar is dropping in price, and we need to actually use that to our advantage.
      • I had a metal roof put on my house last month. The total cost (materials + labor) was only $3066. That was for 14.5 squares installed on a rather small house. The lowest estimate I got for asphalt shingles was $3500. Since I'm 64 years old, I expect the metal roof to last me the rest of my life.
        If I someday decide to go with solar, it will probably be somewhere other than on my roof, maybe a thousand square feet out in the yard on the south side of the house.
        • Where do you live that a metal roof was less than asphalt? When I just priced out my roof earlier this year, decent metal was twice the cost of the architectural shingles I chose, and around 2.5 times the cost of cheap 3-tab...but...most of that was installation differences. I'm guessing you live somewhere where asphalt's weight makes shipping more expensive or somewhere there are a lot of metal roofs?
      • Your total electricity consumption is $50/mo? Where do you live?

        • Your total electricity consumption is $50/mo? Where do you live?

          I'm in Pennsylvania, and I'm only a little more than that. Most goes to the water heater and the Spa.

          It actually isn't that difficult to have a low electricity bill. I have all LED lights, the heater and spa are high efficiency as well as tthe refrigerator and freezer. Even the furnace motor and AC are efficient models.

          We got an electrical bill that compared our payment with our neighbors next to us. It said we pay 10 percent more than they do.Not too bad considering that they are a travelling couple,

        • California. I have no A/C, and nobody is at home most of the days (we both work). Mine ranges from $50-$100 depending on the time of year.
        • I'm in Silicon Valley, and my power is $20-$30/month. It's only me in the house, and I even have a plasma TV (considered to be a power waster though I think that got better towards the later ones, like mine).. I'd like to get solar, and may eventually, but with my low usage, it's hard to make sense fiscally..

      • The site quoted me 33K for the roof and 7K for the battery, with 18K worth of electricity generated over 30 years and a 9K tax credit for a net cost of about 13K over thirty years.

        I'm actually in the market for a roof replacement in the next two years, and I'm interested in solar. I have a small house. An asphalt roof replacement is less than four grand.

        This offer is a complete non-starter for me.

        Your $4K asphalt roof would likely last around 20 years before needing to be replaced, and add little value to your home.

        The $13K net cost solar roof (which actually is far more comparable to tile vs. asphalt in longevity) is warrantied for 30 years, but would actually likely last around 50 years or more. Given increased costs to put a new asphalt roof every 20 years, you would likely be spending about the same on asphalt in a 60-year timeframe.

        That's not including the additional value you would add to you

        • That's not including the additional value you would add to your home by having a solar roof, and also not calculating increases in electrical costs over the next half-century, and not including any tax credits you may qualify for.

          Perhaps you should think about your "non-starter" a bit more. Costs for this tech are likely to decrease, but it's damn near justifying the cost today.

          Did you include the increased property taxes due to the increased value of the house?

        • by jedidiah ( 1196 ) on Thursday May 11, 2017 @12:42PM (#54400923) Homepage

          Where is that space ship you came to planet Earth on?

          NO ONE believes that kind of nonsense you are pushing. Indulging in expensive home improvements won't do squat for your home value. You will NEVER get that money back. So don't even go there and pretend you ever will.

          You better personally enjoy what overpriced nonsense you put into your house because you aint getting that money back.

          Having the most expensive house on the block is financial suicide if you view your house as an investment.

          • You're miscalculating the ROI.

            Your calculation would be correct if you bought a house there, made improvements and sold to make a profit - solar rooftiles, not a good choice to put among those improvements.

            But that ROI is the combined factor of all benefits. It's the saving in your energy bills while you live there plus every other advantage mentioned above plus whatever value increase there is in your house.
            True that value increase is likely to be depressed in that neighbourhood and it's may be less than t

          • Where is that space ship you came to planet Earth on?

            NO ONE believes that kind of nonsense you are pushing. Indulging in expensive home improvements won't do squat for your home value. You will NEVER get that money back. So don't even go there and pretend you ever will.

            You better personally enjoy what overpriced nonsense you put into your house because you aint getting that money back.

            Having the most expensive house on the block is financial suicide if you view your house as an investment.

            Speaking of overpriced nonsense, I don't personally enjoy paying Greed for my electricity. Costs are going to continue to rise for that utility, especially as improvements in efficient design drives consumption down. Greed has never been known to be kind or fair.

            And when treating real estate wisely as a long-term investment (20+ years) instead of some kind of get-rich-quick scheme, it's usually never financial suicide no matter what you do to improve your home.

            To each their own.

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        I'm actually in the market for a roof replacement in the next two years, and I'm interested in solar. I have a small house. An asphalt roof replacement is less than four grand.

        Question is, how good is the roof?

        Asphalt is usually warrantied for 25 years or so then it needs replacement. And replacing an asphalt roof is environmentally damaging - you can't really recycle the shingles at all - it's just landfill.

        You could consider metal roofs, the metal is rated for 50-100 years, so instead of replacing your as

      • that is OK. Continue to pay your expensive electricity and re-roofing every 10-15 years. That is a choice that you made.
    • by AK Marc ( 707885 )
      $101k for my roof, without the tax credits, it has a 29 year ROI (according to Tesla, so likely optimistic). Go Solar Roof!
    • According to this article [cnbc.com], the estimated price is $21.85 per sq. ft. If you have a single-story, 2800 sf. home, and you decide to cover the ENTIRE roof with these tiles, then yeah, you're looking at $70k. Most people building new homes will go with multiple stories, so total square feet of roof space will be something less. And because of sun angle, it's likely the entire roof will not be covered. Though, if you're making that kind of investment, you better design your entire roof to be facing the sun!

      That
    • Currently my house is covered in cedar shingles which have lasted 30 years and will probably make another 10 with a little encouragement. I got a quote for a replacement at $50k installed so if this is $70k for my house then it's only slightly more. Yes, I will gladly pay 50% more for something which will probably last longer plus it will give me free solar energy.

      You're right, you can get a roof for $5k. I could replace the tiles with a tin roof tomorrow for a fraction of the price. Of course, it would

    • Who the hell would sink USD$70 for a (solar) roof?

      At that price, I'll buy a few thousand kits and make millions of dollars in profit.

    • we have replaced our roof 2x in the last 8-10 years.
      I think that it was replaced as well in the 4 year prior.
      Why? HAIL.

      If we get hail again to the point, where we need a new re-roofing, we will switch to this.
      It is cheaper than metal or tiled roofs and supposed to hold up better.

      And like our insurance company, we are tired of paying for new roofs.
  • by WillAffleckUW ( 858324 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @05:26PM (#54396465) Homepage Journal

    The comparison stands up for a comparison with high end 50 year tiled roofs.

    Not your typical roof retiling with shingles.

    • That's still pretty good. What is the actual price though; the article didn't mention this. Roof tiles are quite common here (pretty much every roof has them), and mine need replacing soon as they are over 75 years old. So naturally I am interested.

      If they are as expensive as regular tiles, the good news is that you might as well cover the whole roof in these things for a uniform look, not just the side that faces the sun.
      • by un1nsp1red ( 2503532 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @06:10PM (#54396699) Homepage

        What is the actual price though; the article didn't mention this.

        $21.85 per square foot.

        If they are as expensive as regular tiles, the good news is that you might as well cover the whole roof in these things for a uniform look, not just the side that faces the sun.

        I can't find the price right now, but there is a dramatically cheaper price for the non-solar tiles. i.e., They're anticipating that you cover your entire roof with their tiles (re: uniform look), but the entire roof will not be solar-collecting.

        • Seems really wasteful to cover the non-productive side of the roof with solar tiles. They could presumably produce similar looking non-solar tiles at a much lower cost so that you could have the uniform look without paying extra for solar tiles that won't be doing anything for you.
          • Seems really wasteful to cover the non-productive side of the roof with solar tiles. They could presumably produce similar looking non-solar tiles at a much lower cost so that you could have the uniform look without paying extra for solar tiles that won't be doing anything for you.

            That begs the question, do subsidies help pay for the non-solar shingles? I bet their math assumes so.

        • by Namarrgon ( 105036 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @09:31PM (#54397553) Homepage

          $21.85 per square foot.

          That's the "average" price. Active tiles are about [bloomberg.com] $42/square foot, inactive tiles are $11/square foot. Depends on your roof how many of each you need.

    • The comparison stands up for a comparison with high end 50 year tiled roofs.

      Well, I just had my entire roof redone (wood beams and planks and everything) for 4500â, and that does indeed include a 50 year warranty on the clay tiles, which basically translates into "change everything again after 75-100 years".

      So that's $5000 for 100 years.

  • by Vorendell ( 1086257 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @05:41PM (#54396545)
    In Colorado at least, there is a limit to the amount of solar energy you can produce. We discovered this when we put our panels up. It's something like 2xdaily maximum of use based on a couple of years of power bills. So you might not be able to do your whole roof in these things anyway. I like the idea, but some of the municipal restrictions get in the way.
    • by AK Marc ( 707885 )
      Is that a limit on generation, or a limit on sell-back? If a limit on sell-back, you just get one (or more) batteries, and you push the power into batteries for use.

      The utilities don't want a grid with 100% of the population having 50% of their needs met with solar. At noon, the grid would be over-generating, but the utility would still be buying the wasted power. Then at night, when generation drops to zero, they have to make a baseline generation.

      Granted, that doesn't, hasn't, and never will happen,
      • Peak power usage conveniently matches peak sunlight.

        People run A/C to cool down. It sucks a lot of power.

        • by AK Marc ( 707885 )
          There are two peaks every day, one at noon and one at 6. Peak cooling and peak cooking. And AC demands are not high in CO in cooler months.
    • They also have tiles without solar cells in them which are presumably cheaper, so you can choose what percentage of the roof's surface generates power.

  • by lessthan ( 977374 ) on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @05:41PM (#54396547)

    The calculator just told me that I'll see a savings of $100 over 30 years. I think I'm going to wait for fusion to become a thing.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @06:32PM (#54396811)

      When I need a new roof, I will strongly consider buying a Tesla roof. Even if it costs slightly more than a normal roof. This may not be the answer to all our energy problems, but it's a solid attempt to try something. I look at it as voting with my dollar, which probably has a much bigger effect than who I voted for for president. You never hear anyone saying "you'll never earn your money back buying a Mercedes", but people still buy them. I'd rather support a company trying to make progress, rather than blatantly pissing it away.

      • by curt_k ( 533018 )
        Individual solutions to climate change, I think, are kind of a waste of money and cycles, it's going to be structural, societal, governmental changes, and fast (not over a 30 roof life) or we as a biosphere are in deep trouble. So, lawyers now > save a trickle of energy for 30 years. I hate to be negative for a company that, like you say, is trying to do something, but I think a better environmental case could be made for doing a conventional roof and donating the $X,000 you'd save over a Tesla roof to
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          The more individuals who do things like install expensive solar roofs, the more the price comes down for others who might do the same thing but can't do it for the high price.

          So yes, individual actions really can make a difference.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Does that include health benefits and long term cost savings of avoided environmental damage due to coal/gas/nuclear energy consumption?

      You might also factor in your electricity use increasing considerably as electric vehicles will be fairly common in a decade, and the added benefit of a Powerwall whole-house UPS (dependent on the frequency of black/brown outs in your area).

    • The calculator just told me that I'll see a savings of $100 over 30 years. I think I'm going to wait for fusion to become a thing.

      So let's take it at face value. Are you planning to live for thirty years or more? If so, then you'd get a hundred bucks and you'd have your own solar power system effectively for free. Is that worth nothing to you?

  • We have a pitch of 8 and a pretty large multilevel roof, this calculator tells me that a 50% coverage Tesla roof + battery will cost me $54K with the tax break, down to costing $20K after 30 years. That's still more than a shingled roof would cost today, and to be comparable to a fancy tiled roof I guess I'd have to wait until I'm very, very old.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Anticipated by his brother ?, Solar City was as good as dead without being bailed out by Elon, shame Tesla investors had to pay for his families business failures, its still doomed to fail, there is way too much competition from the people that actually make the panels for Elon (China), as for their "Powerwall" its just a metal box full of Panasonic tech with a Tesla sticker, the market would do better to skip the middlemen and buy direct from the manufacturers and not the sticker men.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday May 10, 2017 @09:25PM (#54397531)

    Last year I replaced my roof with a conventional asphalt shingle roof. These were timberland lifetime warranty shingles (really a 25 year warranty). Quoted roof size was 21 square (2100 sq ft) at a cost of $12,600. This is on a single story hipped ranch with 4/12 pitch, ice and water up 2 rows, 2 layer tear off (old roof) cutting in a ridge vent, and adding a chimney cricket (use google).

    Tesla quotes $68,700 for this same roof with a 30 year warranty. Run some numbers... (and I'm going to ignore government incentives)

    Tesla claims a $18,600 savings in energy. If I was able to take out a solo mortgage at 3.92% for 30 years on $50k for this roof it'd cost me $85k in the end, well offsetting the $18k savings and putting me $17k in the hole.

    Lets run the numbers the other way. Say I had the difference ($50k) laying around and I wanted to invest that at the rate I'd pay for the roof in the above example ($236/mo for 30 yrs) in a monthly compounded account you'd accrue $142k after 30 years.

    I love the idea of widespread renewables, but I can never get the long term financials to play out in their favor.

    • by jezwel ( 2451108 )
      Is there any change to the value of your house with Tesla shingles installed vs normal shingles? Many people sell property and move on, so if adding these increase the value of the house it may be a zero-sum game.
    • If you are adding the time value of money, with one of the factors, you need to add the time value of money to all the factors. I don't think it would change the answer much but make the margins a little closer.
      • by j-beda ( 85386 )

        Additionally, one should reduce the investment income by the income tax rate. Decreased expenses are equivalent to tax-free income.

  • Even without ANY solar panels, they're roughly costing 4x the price of a 'regular' roof, once you select 70% solar, you're looking at 10x the price of a 'regular' roof.

    And for that I save about $1k/year, it's a very poor investment. Get a metal roof and 'regular' solar panels, the same amount of energy for less than a quarter of the cost and the same 30-100y lifespan.

  • $50k for a new roof is not remotely comparable to the ~$7K it cost a few years ago for a traditional roof (paid for by insurance, due to hail damage)

    Even if it could completely eliminate my electric bill (which is unlikely)(and which would require the additional $7k battery) that only saves me $100/mo - which means it would take be 47 years to pay this off, and even then only if the financing rate was 0% (also unlikely)

    As wonderful as an idea as solar roof is, at the prices so far, its completely infeasibl

    • Where I live, a lot of middle income people are already selling power back into the grid via solar, so upgrading facilities isn't an issue everywhere. There are some pretty hefty tax incentives for doing it, and the entrepreneurs are in full hunt mode figuring out ways to get people into it. Mainly through various long term lease schemes where the homeowner leases the solar equipment but still retains rights to any profits from power reselling. The main factor though is lower electricity bills, and that mon
    • Whole roof SOLAR + ROOF. Not a fair comparison to just a new roof without solar. That said, this obviously is not cheap; plus I don't see the reason for paying a lot for expensive tiles on the side of the roof that does not see much sun. Perhaps their non-tiles (assuming they have those) are much cheaper??

      Comparing payback at fixed power rates that will never go up--- and they always go up-- is also not fair. That said, this is again not cheap still. In CA, power is many years ahead that is, their rates

  • by coofercat ( 719737 ) on Thursday May 11, 2017 @11:33AM (#54400453) Homepage Journal

    I haven't done a proper survey, but I'd say most roof coverings in Europe are teracotta tiles, clay tiles etc. There are a few slate roofs, some thatch and a few other materials. There's no way these tiles would look any good on any of those except maybe the synthetic slate roofs. Then there's the cost... way more than a few flat panels (and probably still more than panels sunk into the roof line). I'm sure I don't need to point out that a lot of European roofs have been up for a hundred years and are still watertight, so we're going to need more than a 30 year warranty.

    However, for an "i am rich" statement, these'll do great ;-)

  • According to the company, the tiles will be more affordable than typical roofing

    I'm curious as to how they make solar panels cheaper than roofing tiles.

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