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Dell Unveils XPS 27 All-In-One With 10 Speaker Dual 50W Sound System (hothardware.com) 53

MojoKid writes: Over the past couple of years, Dell has been driving a redesign effort of its consumer and commercial product lines and has systematically been updating both design signatures and the technology platforms within them. Dell's premium consumer XPS product line, perhaps more so than any other, has seen the most significant design reinvention with the likes of its XPS 13 and XPS 15 notebook line. At CES 2017, Dell announced the XPS 27 7760 all-in-one PC that has a radically new look that draws at least one design cue from its XPS notebook siblings, specifically with respect to the display bezel, or the lack thereof. Though Dell isn't officially branding the touch-enabled version of XPS 27 with an "InfinityEdge" display, the side and top bezel is cut to a minimum, accentuating a beautiful 4K IPS panel. However, the machine's display might not be the most standout feature of the 2017 Dell XPS 27. Under that display, Dell actually expanded things mechanically to make room not only for a Windows Hello capable camera but a 10 speaker sound system that was designed in conjunction with Grammy Award-winning music producer and audio engineer, JJ Puig, that takes the system's audio reproduction and output capabilities to a whole new level. Its sound system is very accurate with dual 50 watt amplifiers at less than 1% THD (Total Harmonic Distortion) and a 70Hz to 20KHz frequency response. Though the system is currently built on Intel's Skylake platform, Kaby Lake versions are imminent and with discrete AMD Radeon R9 M470X graphics, it has decent gaming and multimedia chops as well.
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Dell Unveils XPS 27 All-In-One With 10 Speaker Dual 50W Sound System

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  • So, does the sound system consume 50 watts of power in operation, or is it capable of converting 50 watts of power into sound?

    • Re:50 Watts, huh? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by BigBuckHunter ( 722855 ) on Saturday January 07, 2017 @03:48AM (#53622453)

      So, does the sound system consume 50 watts of power in operation, or is it capable of converting 50 watts of power into sound?

      Uncle Doug explains it pretty well.... https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

      TLDW... Input 1k signal. Plug amp into a load with a known resistance. Turn up volume till it is max volume distortion free. Measure voltage to the load. P=V^2/R. This will give you RMS output.

  • by Kunedog ( 1033226 ) on Saturday January 07, 2017 @03:42AM (#53622443)
    One of the most expensive components of your computer is your monitor, but it is also one of the most standardized and longest-lasting. Think about it: pretty much any monitor bought in the last 20+ years* (including CRTs) can be used with any computer or video card on the market, requiring at most a super cheap adapter.

    But with an AIO, you lose this major advatage desktop systems have over laptops. You're still paying for the monitor, but have little to no choice in which model it will be, and you will only ever use it with this one computer. And when the computer dies, the monitor is finished too (even if it's in working condition).

    * Yeah, I know analog/VGA is starting to go away. I still holds for digital.
    • by Khyber ( 864651 )

      If the computer dies, the monitor is still just fine and dandy, and can quite often be swapped into another bezel (or be ballsy and build a custom PC case with the monitor as a side-panel. Kits exist for this exact thing and they're like $30.)

      • If the computer dies, the monitor is still just fine and dandy, and can quite often be swapped into another bezel (or be ballsy and build a custom PC case with the monitor as a side-panel. Kits exist for this exact thing and they're like $30.)

        Only a tiny proportion of consumers will do that. The rest will chuck it and buy another.

      • If the computer dies, the monitor is still just fine and dandy, and can quite often be swapped into another bezel (or be ballsy and build a custom PC case with the monitor as a side-panel. Kits exist for this exact thing and they're like $30.)

        Technically that's a valid point, and I just found this video [youtube.com] which admittedly makes it look like a productive (and fun!) project for the right sort of person. I even kind of want to tear apart one of my retired laptops now and do it (thx for the idea btw).

        But practically, it will almost never happen, and this epitome of vendor lock-in will pay off (and the vendors know it). I mean, the same is true of laptops, but I've never known anyone who's done this; have you?

    • by SirSlud ( 67381 )

      Desktops or whatever you want to call this don't really die tho.

    • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

      One of the most expensive components of your computer is your monitor, but it is also one of the most standardized and longest-lasting. Think about it: pretty much any monitor bought in the last 20+ years* (including CRTs) can be used with any computer or video card on the market, requiring at most a super cheap adapter.

      But with an AIO, you lose this major advatage desktop systems have over laptops. You're still paying for the monitor, but have little to no choice in which model it will be, and you will onl

    • One of the most expensive components of your computer is your monitor, but it is also one of the most standardized and longest-lasting. Think about it: pretty much any monitor bought in the last 20+ years* (including CRTs) can be used with any computer or video card on the market, requiring at most a super cheap adapter.

      But with an AIO, you lose this major advatage desktop systems have over laptops. You're still paying for the monitor, but have little to no choice in which model it will be, and you will only ever use it with this one computer. And when the computer dies, the monitor is finished too (even if it's in working condition).

      * Yeah, I know analog/VGA is starting to go away. I still holds for digital.

      Unless you replace your computer every 2 years (which is ridiculous nowadays), by the time your computer is ready for the dustbin, the monitor is not far behind,

      And, unless you get a really high-end monitor, replacing a monitor costs less than, or about the same as, replacing a 4 TB internal HD.

  • Im feeling so embarrassed and confused.
  • That GPU isn't going to run games well at 4k.

    • That GPU isn't going to run games well at 4k.

      I was wondering about that.

      People have excoriating Apple for offering an RX 460 (with 4 GB GDDR5 RAM) in the 2016 MacBook Pro; yet this crappy little AIO, with an R9 M470X (with 2 GB GDDR5 RAM), is supposed to be God's gift to gaming.

      I also looks like the RX 460 is indeed better in every way [gpuboss.com] vs. the R9 M470X. Another example of unbridled Apple Hate, or is there a huge difference between the two GPUs? Because, it looks like the R9 M470X is based on the older "Bonaire" technology, whereas the RX 460 is th

      • Most 'M' GPUs make compromises so they can use less power and produce less heat. That is what lets them be deployed in laptops and all in 1s. The GPU in question here would probably be okay to game with at 1080P but no way will it handle the native 4k resolution of this unit.

        • by Khyber ( 864651 )

          " The GPU in question here would probably be okay to game with at 1080P but no way will it handle the native 4k resolution of this unit."

          This will run 4K Quake 3 smoother than glass (as I'm doing that right now on my shitty GeForce 650Ti.) It's as if you forgot about older games and nothing exists any more except Battlefield or Call of Duty or the ever-unoptimized Crysis.

  • it's a dell.

    Typical conversation with someone that loves a dell:

    I love my dell. It's fucking awesome. Of course, I had to return the first 3 they sent me because they were broken. And the wifi chip is garbage but it's a simple matter to take the laptop apart, de-solder it and solder in a new one. And sure the trackpad is awful and randomly clicks but I use a mouse. But yeah I love my dell. 10/10. Would buy and return until they sent me one that works again.

    • by _merlin ( 160982 )

      The quality of Dell's professional products has slowly improved over the years. I'm very happy with current PowerEdge (13th generation) and Precision. I did have one issue with the Precision in that when it arrived the SAS card was in a slot directly above a Quadro so it didn't get enough cooling and overheated. I moved it to another slot and put a Chelsio T580-LP-CR (2x40Gbps Ethernet) card in that slot, and it's been fine. A decade ago, PowerEdge was the cut-price server with crappy build quality, and

    • That's getting to be old news. I do remember those days, but lately they seem to have upped their game.My sister bought her kids mid-range Dell Inspiron laptops for university three years ago and they're still running. My work computer is a dell box with 16GB and an I7 and it hasn't so much as hiccuped in two years. As always, YMMV.

    • by nnull ( 1148259 )
      I would agree with you, but since buying an XPS 13 with linux running on it, I've been quite happy. I would have never thought of buying a Dell either, but I did and I've been happy with it.
  • My shitty old Centrino-based Toshiba laptop had better speaker response range - 40Hz to 22,050Hz.

    Guess Dell's using some shitty Beats by Dre knockoff audio system.

  • They should have dialed it up to eleven - speakers.

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