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Data Storage Hardware Hacking Build

Raspberry Pi Gets Affordable, Power Efficient 314GB Hard Drive On Pi Day 144

Mickeycaskill writes: Western Digital has released a had drive optimized for the Raspberry Pi. The 314GB drive, released on Pi Day (3/14), costs $31.42 for a limited time and promises to be more reliable, power efficient and easier to use with the computer than other storage. The company, which also has a 1TB drive, says the unit has been designed to coordinate with the Pi's own power systems in order to minimize energy use without affecting the maximum data transfer rate on a USB connection. The Raspberry Pi Foundation says the new drive will stimulate the development of storage-hungry projects.
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Raspberry Pi Gets Affordable, Power Efficient 314GB Hard Drive On Pi Day

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  • I seriously doubt it costs less to manufacture this thing than a 1TB drive. WD has 1TB 2.5" drives with two 500GB platters; they'd lower the density and use the same parts to get a 314GB drive, or raise the density and use 1 platter to get 314GB. You're either dealing with one platter short (a piece of glass, coating, and a magnetic head) and a higher-density RW head (more expensive) or the same amount of hardware and a lower-density RW head (more tooling to bother making the damn thing). You might brea

    • Supply and demand, if the supply of 1TB drives increases then the price of all of them go down. If an artificially reduced capacity can target a different market segment than the 1TB segment then only the products in that segment are impacted by the pricing effects.

      Not exactly the same, but CPU and GPU makes have done the equivalent of this for years, different parts get binned for different speeds. Flash chips with too many flaws are send down to a lower grade and are less resilient to the inevitable wear.

      • Re:economics (Score:5, Insightful)

        by bluefoxlucid ( 723572 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @03:13PM (#51695481) Journal

        Supply-and-demand is a simplistic theory that generally describes economics in the same way that air pressure dynamics generally describe airplane lift.

        Your theory has merit--it's a known market cycle in unsaturated markets--but it tends to fall apart in saturated markets. Competition tends to bring prices down in the long run. In the initial market, a bunch of SSD manufacturers have kept prices high without collusion in an effort to capture early adopters, with notable price differences between them; but as the early adopters started to saturate, the prices started more closely following actual costs. You start getting things like Samsung EVO 850 drives competing on price with friggin' OCZ budget drives. After that point, market destratification starts setting in pretty hard.

        Binning parts that don't hold up to test is different. A 1GB flash chip with 10% defect rate can be a 9GB flash chip. A CPU process's variable nature can produce processors that run at 4.5GHz and others that run at 3.9GHz. You trash the broken ones, you repurpose the sub-par ones. That's not artificial; it's a form of quality control. Intel *has* binned high-performance parts as low-performance to balance for market demand, which *is* what you describe.

        I don't think an artificially-lowered capacity with a lowered price is sustainable. A competitor will be able to provide something twice as big for the same price. Likewise, competition on 1TB drives will drive them down toward cost, and no amount of of supply-and-demand handwaving will make drives cheaper than cost in the long run--market saturation tends to cause this.

        • Is the market for USB native drives for hobbyists a saturated market?

          Part binning will take parts that are good, and fuse them down to a lower spec to keep the high end market from sliding down. It's artificial in that case, but maybe you weren't aware of that practice?

          Most of the speculation on this should be taken with a grain of salt because WD is a weird company with a lot of weird products. We can't assume them to be a rational actor.

        • A 1GB flash chip with 10% defect rate can be a 9GB flash chip.

          Who knew a defect could be such a good thing.

          • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

            by Anonymous Coward

            And you think that I have a bad memory!

    • by Anonymous Coward

      They ALREADY sell a 320GB drive, this is probably just that thing with a default partition table that doesn't allocate 6GB of it.

    • It's likely either a 500GB platter or 1TB platter with a high number of marked defects. Binned parts is nothing new.

    • Actually, if the 1TB drive is using 2 500GB platters, they'd be lowering the density whether they used 1 or 2 platters. Or, perhaps they use a single 500GB platter and underprovision it, so they're saving on one platter while using existing parts and capitalize on a marketing opportunity.

      Unless my understanding of math is wrong and 314 is suddenly more than 500.
      • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

        I wonder if they are recycling failed platters.

        A few years back there was a company called Magnetic Data Technologies (MDT) that bought up broken hard drives returned to manufacturers, mapped the bad blocks, reduced their capacity to compensate and provide some new spare blocks, and sold them. They were incredibly unreliable, and even thought MDT offered only a one year warranty the return rate (at least where I worked) was close to 100%.

        Maybe WD are just taking some platters that didn't have the minimum nu

    • A 2 platter drive uses more power than a 1 platter drive.

      • Only for initial spin-up. Once it's spun up, it's going to idle with the same power consumption. You lose friction in the spindle, but you store energy in the platters; as long as the spindle has the same surface contact, friction, and velocity, you don't lose any more power holding the drive idle.

        • Two platters have twice as much contact with the air around them.

          What do you think suspends the head above the platter, against the force of the spring/arm holding it down? Air is forced under it by the surface of the platter..

          Here's a random datasheet http://www.wdc.com/wdproducts/... [wdc.com]
          Idle power between 8.6W and 4.4W. They're all the same physical size, the same series, same RPM, same cache size, same interface.
          Guess what the difference is? Number of platters and number of heads. There's also 4dB difference

          • by Agripa ( 139780 )

            You can go a step further and tell from the power specifications how many platters and sometimes heads are used despite the manufacturers leaving this information off.

    • by kenh ( 9056 )

      they'd lower the density and use the same parts to get a 314GB drive, or raise the density and use 1 platter to get 314GB

      You think they'd have to raise the density of a 500 GB platter to make it a 314 GB device? Lat time I checked 314 GB is 500 GB.

      They could very easily just limit the storage of a 500 GB drive in firmware, preventing access to anything over 314 GB...

      This drive requires a cable (not included $10-17 more), or you can just buy the $79.95 1TB PiDrive kit that includes the 1TB drive, power sup

      • It depends on if they're starting with a 4 platter 1TB drive or a 2 platter 1TB drive.

        • by Agripa ( 139780 )

          If the 1TB drive has 2 platters, then that is 4 surfaces with 250GB per surface. Removing one platter and two heads leaves 500GB of capacity. Lowering that to 314GB means either 1 platter and 2 surfaces at a lower density of 1 surface at a higher density.

    • by Agripa ( 139780 )

      Lower capacity drives built with exactly the same hardware cost less because they can spend less time on the machine which formats the embedded servo information.

      And if the 1TB drive uses 2 platters, then the density for 314GB on 1 platter will be *lower* unless they only use one side.

  • The 314GB drive, released on Pi Day (3/14), costs $31.42

    Stuff like this makes me wonder exactly what percentage of the U.S. GDP comes from pun-based purchases.

  • Silly Americans. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ledow ( 319597 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @01:13PM (#51694881) Homepage

    It's only Pi day if you don't understand precedence of unit size.

    Small / Larger / Largest
    DD/MM/YYYY

    or Large / Smaller / Smallest
    YYYY/MM/DD

    None of them make a nice "Pi Day" number.

    Unless you're considering the 31/4/1592 or 3141/5/9.

    MM/DD/YYYY is just stupid.

    • Sounds like someone's jealous of not getting pie at work today!

      (Currently gobbling slices of both pecan pie and apple pie!).

    • by Roger W Moore ( 538166 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @01:24PM (#51694931) Journal
      Actually for the rest of the world surely 22/7 is close enough to be used as Pi day.
    • I don't agree that a society is "stupid" for ordering dates based on how they are typically announced in English.

      In English the options are:
      March 14th, 2016
      14th of March, 2016

      With the later being somewhat archaic sounding in the US, except for the Fourth of July. (the whole "st", "nd", "rd", "th" thing is pretty old fashion too, but I used it in my example for clarity)

      • This only raises another question: why is the month before the date in spoken English? It still doesn't make any sense. Just because you've done something wrong for centuries doesn't make it right by default.

        • by bws111 ( 1216812 )

          How is it 'wrong'? Language is determined by how people use it.

          • by dave420 ( 699308 )

            Descriptive languages are, but not prescriptive languages. Luckily for you English is the former and not the latter :)

        • by Lumpy ( 12016 )

          Because the month is the most important time measurement. then the day and then lastly the year.

          The year is useless. Knowing if it's august and I need to start thinking about harvest time or it's april and I need to get my ass moving on planting is far more important.

          • by kenh ( 9056 )

            Because the month is the most important time measurement. then the day and then lastly the year.

            How did month become more significant than year?

            • by Dog-Cow ( 21281 )

              Most people live in the present. Unless one is speaking of an event in a different year, it's completely superfluous. The month can also be superfluous, but that doesn't happen as often because the span is only 28-31 days.

          • When I was in College, long before 1984 and the introduction of dates in desktop computers (in other words, I had no idea how anyone else did it), I numbered my lecture notes sequentially; the only way to do that is Month / Day / Year.

            010612.02 would be Jan 6 2001 page 2

            If you do it any other way, the date becomes your sequential indicator, which breaks it as far as determining which page was written first (the day of the month becomes the "first" page, so 1 Jan and 1 Feb follow each other, not 1 Jan follow

        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Here is the explanation. People used to use these things called paper calendars and planners. When you wanted to index to a certain date in the calendar (for writing down an appointment or the like), you first found the month, then you found the day of that month. It was generally assumed that you weren't making an appointment a year in advance or that occurs in the past so there was less need for the year and it came last. Very simple. Page to the proper month, index down to the proper day, write down the
          • by viperidaenz ( 2515578 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @02:58PM (#51695413)

            My calendar has 31 pages with 12 months on each page, you insensitive clod.

          • by jeremyp ( 130771 )

            Ah, but they had a different calendar for each year, so the first thing to do is make sure you have the calendar for the right year, which means the year should come first.

            Anyway, we are not talking about how people say dates but how they should be written down in numerical form. The best way is to put the largest unit first, then the next biggest and so on (e.g. ISO format). The second best way is to reverse the order. The way the USA does it is just insane, which is why most of the World does something di

        • by jabuzz ( 182671 )

          Note that month before day is normally only used in English when there is no year involved. When is you birthday and you might respond March the 15th. When where you born and you would respond the 15th March 2000.

          However writing it down as American's do has nothing whatsoever to do with the English language, because the English (aka the people who actually invented the language) use DD/MM/YYYY like the rest of the civilized world. It's only the American's who insist on using illogical date orders.

      • I don't agree that a society is "stupid" for ordering dates based on how they are typically announced in English.

        You haven't had to deal with daily reports where one person in the job uses a US numbering system, and his other-month opposite number uses Norwegian numbering, and you're the schmuck who has to sort it out for a 300-day operation.

        TTBOMK, the only modern society which rationally chose a date representation was the Japanese, after their self-imposed isolation was broken forcibly by the US Navy. Y

        • You haven't had to deal with daily reports where one person in the job uses a US numbering system, and his other-month opposite number uses Norwegian numbering, and you're the schmuck who has to sort it out for a 300-day operation.

          I've actually had to write software to parse multiple date formats. It was a bunch of annoying extra work that I despise because societies were not able to agree on a convention. Hell, societies don't even agree on a calendar, there are a bunch of them. And if you ever run into really old records, the Russian Empire didn't upgrade the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar until the early 20th century. It's a real pain to automate digging through old records without also providing enough context for the

          • Yep, had to deal with Pre-revolutionary Russian dates. Which is why astronomers (who do, indeed, regularly have to deal with periods outside the Gregorian calendar) use the Julian Date, which is reasonably consistent from (I'd have to check ; "about") 8000 BCE to 8000 CE.

            It pisses me off that it's necessary. But getting the mess sorted out (after identifying the problem) has paid my mortgage in the past : two companies, neither mine, blaming each other over the failure of a piece of equipment. One company

    • YYYYMMDD works for PI day as most rational people only consider MMDD. It is an ANNUAL thing after all, so the year is ignored.

    • It's large to smallest with no year component. Most holidays happen every year, not just once.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Actually, no it's not, you silly Brit.

      There are many valid reasons in spoken English to have the month come first. Think about when you talk to someone about an upcoming appointment / meeting you want to set. It makes a great deal of sense to mention the month first, because that is some of the greatest uncertainty in the statement. If you say, "March 20th" you quickly know that you're speaking about a date coming up soon, versus if you say "the 20th of March", you leave out the month in suspens
      • by Roger W Moore ( 538166 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @02:28PM (#51695275) Journal

        By the way, the Declaration of Independence was signed "July 4, 1776". I think we'll be keeping that, thanks.

        Yes, but rather ironically you typically refer to it as the "4th of July" don't you?

        • by bws111 ( 1216812 )

          We refer to the holiday as the 4th of July. We refer to the date it occurs on as July 4. Probably started doing that precisely so it doesn't sound like just any old date.

      • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

        It makes a great deal of sense to mention the month first, because that is some of the greatest uncertainty in the statement.

        That's why the ISO date format is YYYY/MM/DD, which also makes sorting easier. If the goal is to put the greatest uncertainty first, then MM/DD/YYYY obviously fails.

        Sorry, but it is silly. It's the worst of all possible options. No logical size ordering, and only puts the most important part first if the year happens to be inconsequential.

        By the way, the Declaration of Independence was signed "July 4, 1776"

        Which is commonly referred to as the "4th of July".

    • It's "Steak and a Blowjob Day" no matter how you write it. Of course, I wouldn't expect anybody here to know that.

      It's MM/DD/YYYY because when we say it out loud, we say March 14th 2016. What would you Brits know about the English language anyway? :)
    • MM/DD/YYYY is just stupid.

      Exactly. Just as expressing time of day in Minutes, Hours, Seconds would be stupid. By the logic of "MM/DD/YYYY", Pi hour would occur at 14:03:16 instead of at 3:14:16.

      • by Dog-Cow ( 21281 )

        Wouldn't the time equivalent of MM/DD/YYYY be minutes/seconds/hours?

        MM = 2nd most frequently changing unit = minutes
        DD = 1st most frequently changing unit = seconds
        YYYY = 3rd most frequently changing unit = hours

        In any event, MM/DD is equivalent hours:minutes, so it makes perfect sense. Putting the least important information at the end (YYYY) also makes sense. Therefore, the assertion that MM/DD/YYYY is stupid could only be made by someone with absolutely no ability to reason.

        • by jeremyp ( 130771 )

          MM/DD is equivalent hours:minutes, so it makes perfect sense.

          Nope.

          MM/DD is equivalent to minutes:seconds MM/DD/YYYY is equivalent to minutes:seconds:hours. In fact, the example gives the lie to the "it's the same way we say it" argument because people often say "it's 25 minutes past four" and yet nobody is seriously suggesting putting minutes before hours in written times.

    • by kenh ( 9056 )

      None of them make a nice "Pi Day" number.

      Unless you're considering the 31/4/1592 or 3141/5/9.

      MM/DD/YY = 3/14/15 last year! - some went so far as to celebrate at 9:26 AM for 3/14/15 9:26 AM

    • by jeremyp ( 130771 )

      31st April? That's as fictional as 3rd Dodecember.

      Since pi cannot be expressed as a fraction, we should just take the best approximation, which is 22nd July.

  • The 314GB drive, released on Pi Day (3/14), costs $31.42 for a limited time

    Considering it's only 314GB, and you can get 4TB 2.5" disks for $150.

    The PiDrive gives you 10 GB per $1, versus 27 GB per $1 by purchasing 4TB conventional hard disks.

    They have an interesting definition of 'data hungry'

    • by xanthines-R-yummy ( 635710 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @01:21PM (#51694913) Homepage Journal

      And what are the power requirements for those 4TB drives again?

      The Pi drive, aside from the quasi-humorous capacity, was meant to be low power for the low power Raspberry Pi.

      • by mysidia ( 191772 )

        And what are the power requirements for those 4TB drives again?

        There is not a substantial change in power consumption relative to capacity of a 2.5" disk drive. Power consumption is mainly affected by what RPM rate the platter is driven at.

        The Seagate Momentus ST4000LM016 [cnet.com] 2.5" Laptop HDD 4TB is reported to have datasheet Power consumption values: 0.85 Watt (Idle), 1.9 Watt (Read), 2.1 Watt (Write)

        I think that's a datasheet power consumption for a 4TB disk less than the PiDrive what other Slashdot pos

    • The integrated USB interface and power requirements are the draw here, though you could roll your own. You're paying for convenience. You know, the same way people buy a $2-$3 cup of coffee when it would be far cheaper to make it themselves?

    • by Aaden42 ( 198257 )

      Spoken like a true American. Moar is always better value, even if you don’t need all of it, right? Would you like your Pi[drive] supersized?

      Consider it in terms of “cost per GB you actually use.” If you’re doing some kind of small embedded thing that needs maybe 200GB of storage for data logging (which is a pretty enormous amount for many purpose), then the cost of that 4TB drive was actually $0.75/GB. The cheaper PiDrive is $0.1571/GB in that case. That’s only counting th

      • by jedidiah ( 1196 )

        > Spoken like a true American. Moar is always better value, even if you donâ(TM)t need all of it, right? Would you like your Pi[drive] supersized?

        I have stacks and stacks of multi-terabyte spinning rust and I am still at a loss to see point of this thing.

        I also have 200G of flash on my phone.

        Just put a decent ethernet port on the thing and let the bulk storage be some place else on the local network. If you are willing to settle for USB, network storage isn't going to be any worse.

        • by jedidiah ( 1196 )

          > > Spoken like a true American. Moar is always better value, even if you donÃ(TM)t need all of it, right? Would you like your Pi[drive] supersized?

          What can I say? I have the extra space AND the extra disposable income... '-p

      • by Anonymous Coward

        That is still far too expensive, and a spinning disk is a very bad match for a Pi. The new Pi alone is already straining the envelope of affordable USB power supplies. A Sandisk 120GB SSD is about $40. Put it in a USB2SATA enclosure for a couple of bucks and you'll be much happier. Yes, that's 50% more for a third of the space, but it's light, robust, absolutely silent and doesn't demand a beefy USB power supply. For any serious data storage, both options are much too small anyway and much too expensive for

    • Considering it's only 314GB, and you can get 4TB 2.5" disks for $150.

      And you can get a 50lb. bag of rice for under $20. Doesn't mean you need that much or that it would be worthwhile to buy 50lbs. every time you need some rice.

    • pairing a $35 computer with a $150 drive?

      The point about this modest capacity hard disk is that it creates a cheap setup for well under $US100.

  • Pi Day should be 22/7.

    • Roundabouts whar I come frum, Pi day is just the third day of every year, that is, January 3. It's writ down in the Bible that way, and that's good enuff fer us. No fancy-froo dessimul points or fractions for us, city slicker!

      Now, down the road a piece there's some idjuts who celebrate it on January 4. But they's just ignerant.

    • Actually... Pi day should be recognized on 21/7, with the party slated to start no sooner than 23:47:15.236 UTC on that day.
    • That date isn't significant enough.

    • Pi Day should be 22/7.

      That is Pi Approximation Day.

  • Nifty (Score:5, Informative)

    by b0bby ( 201198 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @01:23PM (#51694925)

    Ok, this isn't the best deal for TB/$, but it's not just a normal drive. I found the WD page:
    http://wdlabs.wd.com/products/... [wd.com]
    and it's a native USB drive, no SATA connectors. So that's pretty neat.

    • Re:Nifty (Score:4, Informative)

      by tlhIngan ( 30335 ) <slashdot AT worf DOT net> on Monday March 14, 2016 @02:22PM (#51695239)

      and it's a native USB drive, no SATA connectors. So that's pretty neat.

      Actually, a lot of the USB 3 drives manufactured by WD ARE USB drives, there's no SATA interface exposed anywhere (maybe internally, but that's it).

      They've been around for a couple of years now, if not longer, and are a complete PITA because if something goes wrong, you can't fix it by plugging the drive into a dock. Especially common human-based errors like the connector breaking off or distorted because they yanked it out crooked, dropped it with the connector attached, or pushed it in forcefully.

      • by b0bby ( 201198 )

        Huh, I had no idea. Good to know. I haven't ever opened one of those mypassport drives up.

      • Re:Nifty (Score:5, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 14, 2016 @04:51PM (#51696039)

        The SATA interface is exposed on most of these PCBs at solder points E71 (XMT/A+), E72 (XMT/A-), E73 (XMT/B-), and E75 (XMT/B+). For these to work, a few nearby capacitors need be desoldered, which in turn "disables" the chip that handles the USB chip/interface. The drives themselves still fully support native ATA protocol. Sometimes, alternately you can find drop-in replacement PCBs that provide a native SATA interface (usually taken mobile 2.5" drives). You can find most of this information online (try www.hddoracle.com).

        What isn't immediately disclosed on most (all?) of the sites is the fact that on these USB-interface-only WD drives, the USB chip is also what's doing transparent hardware encryption/decryption of the data that goes to the MCU to be written to/read from the platters. This is usually enabled/in place regardless of what's stated on the box (i.e. WD USB 3.0 2TB Passport "Silver" drives make no mention of encryption yet its being done). So even if you do all the wiring legwork or go through the pain of getting a SATA-based PCB (and dump the contents of two SPI EEPROM chips, U12 and U14, and move the contents of U12 to the SATA-based PCB's U12 -- these are either 8-pin SOIC or VSOP chips, i.e. SMT, and if they're VSOP you can't use a SOIC clip to dump/flash them due to the smaller-height form factor), and everything "magically works", your data is still encrypted.

        There are several ways to deal with this, none of which are economically feasible for most end-users. The most common recommendation is to invest in a US$8000+ hardware/software tool called PC-3000 from ACE Labs. Another you'll seen thrown around is to use a SATA/USB bridge adapter used in WD MyBook drives (which is like playing roulette -- you don't know what adapter/conversion board you're going to get when you buy one of these things, so the odds of it being 100% compatible with your drive's PCB is unlikely).

        What isn't immediately disclosed about the latter is that there are several USB ICs WD chooses to use, none of which are compatible with one another, and there's no standard/commonality in the encryption methods. Sometimes they switch IC vendors on the same product line (e.g. that Silver drive you bought 3 months ago might use a different chip than the one you bought yesterday). The most common I've seen are JMicron (there are two common ICs), and Initio (there are several ICs).

        A full paper was published [iacr.org] about some (not all) the different chips used and their encryption, several of which are "half-ass" -- but regardless of being such, still make it painful to get data from the platters in the case the main PCB fails. To my knowledge there is still no mainstream (e.g. free) software that can do this decryption if you were to give the software, say, a raw disk image (e.g. using dd) of the encrypted drive (still surprising, since at least for the older JMS538S it looks like it should be doable).

        What also isn't disclosed about the "SATA replacement PCB" drop-ins is that they aren't always compatible with the physical hard disk enclosure. For example, it's stated that the SATA PCB version of the 2060-771961-001 is the 771960, however this isn't drop-in compatible due to use of physically larger SPI EEPROM chips. Why would the physically-larger chip be a problem? Because the actual metal/steel of the hard disk enclosure itself doesn't have a deep or wide enough cut-out where the chip would normally sit (when the PCB is mounted), so the PCB can't actually sit flush with the 18-pin I/O interconnect used between the drive and the PCB.

        Source: my own experience, when attempting to recover data from two WD My Passport 2TB drives for a friend of a friend as a favour. (I restored 100% of the data off the Silver drive after doing a bit of work writing some scripts for hddsupertool that did VSC (vendor-specific) ATA commands, but wasn't able to with the Black due to what was likely likely a stuck head -- I don't do head stack replacements). I post

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          While annoying for data recover, I have to say that it's a very good thing that we are moving to encryption by default. Microsoft Surface tablets encrypt their storage by default too, as to many phones these days. There is a quiet little revolution going on.

          The sad thing is that currently Linux support for self-encrypting drives isn't great. Well, neither is Windows support really, but it does work and provides a graphical interface that copes with things like S3 sleep modes. On Linux there is the sedutil,

  • No seek times, RPM, nothing? Are we not supposed to care?

    • Because they're not important for most Raspberry Pi uses.

      The important specifications are:
      - direct connection via USB
      - low power (5VDC @ 0.55A = 2.75 watts)

      What's strange is their compatibility list:
      - Raspberry Pi Model B+, 2 Model B, 3

      So it's not compatible with the Raspberry Pi Zero?

    • by e r ( 2847683 )
      Considering that the RPi shares Ethernet with USB 2.0 and thus results in pathetic IO rates even for a cheapo SBC you could probably get better data rates on a wax tablet than with even an SSD on an RPi.

      If you care about IO speed on an inexpensive SBC then I think you'll need to look at the ODROID offerings:
      ODROID C2 [hardkernel.com] is limited to USB 2.0 but has real Gbit ethernet.
      ODROID XU4 [hardkernel.com] has USB 3.0 and Gbit ethernet.
  • Out of stock (Score:5, Informative)

    by psergiu ( 67614 ) on Monday March 14, 2016 @02:07PM (#51695159)

    Already "Out of stock" on the WD website :(

    • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

      Already "Out of stock" on the WD website :(

      I heard they only produced three of them, and gave up right after starting the fourth.

  • Show me a working order page that ships it to my door for that price, or I'm back to AliBaba and friends ordering real goods.

  • Is there a case available that will affordably, securely and neatly house the drive and the board together and tidy up the appearance of the interconnects?
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'm amazed at the number of people who buy into the Raspberry Pi. We have better boards out there at about the same cost. The Cubie Board, Bannana Pi, and BeagleBone Black are all superior and more reliable / well designed than the Raspberry Pi with its flaky and proprietary software dependencies. I guess when you worked for the company you've got an incentive to go to them for your components in hardware your designing, but man, it's put a real damper on the product.

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