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Cellphones Handhelds Power

Samsung Galaxy S7's Moisture Warning Prevents Charging When Wet (hothardware.com) 74

MojoKid writes: The Samsung Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge don't officially launch for a few more days, but some carriers appear to have shipped pre-orders early and some phones are already in consumers' hands. One early Galaxy S7 Edge owner appears to have tested his phones' water-resistance already and uncovered another new feature in the process. The user submerged his Galaxy S7 Edge in water and snapped a photo, then about four hours later plugged the phone into its fast charger and a warning popped-up on screen that stated, "Moisture detected in charging port", and the phone wouldn't charge. The user dried the phone and let it sit for a while, and it eventually started to charge again, but it wouldn't quick charge any longer. Frustrated, the user RMA'd the phone and plans to send it back to T-Mobile. The Galaxy S7 is IP68 rated, which means it is sealed against dust and can handle continuous submersion in up to 1 meter of water. However, the water detection feature that's apparently built into the Galaxy S7 is a good idea. Though the devices are IP68 rated, a few drops of water in the charging port could easily cause a short when the phone is plugged in.
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Samsung Galaxy S7's Moisture Warning Prevents Charging When Wet

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  • Missing Information (Score:5, Interesting)

    by alvinrod ( 889928 ) on Sunday March 06, 2016 @03:02PM (#51649065)
    So it would never quick charge again or it just wouldn't in the short amount of time the user tested it within, which really isn't stated. For all we know this could have been solved by turning if off and on again and it's something a software/firmware patch can fix.
    • No it's not, moisture will still be detected in the charging port, and the firmware will still react accordingly. I never understood this "X minutes of water resistance when submerged" thing. Does this mean water gets into the device? If I wait a minute and re-submerge it, do I get another X minutes of water resistance? If not, how long I need to wait between submersions? A phone with ports can't really be water resistant. The true water-resistant phone will be full wireless with inductive charging
      • by KGIII ( 973947 )

        For starters, I think you're mistaking water-resistant with water-proof. They are not synonyms. As for the time with regards to resistant, I believe it is cumulative.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 ) <mojo@worl[ ]net ['d3.' in gap]> on Sunday March 06, 2016 @06:08PM (#51649871) Homepage

      Original source here: http://forum.xda-developers.co... [xda-developers.com]

      Long story short, others have not had this problem after submersion and others claim to have had it with cheap cables. The OP seems fairly clueless and didn't do any proper testing.

  • Your USB plug and socket have both gotten wet.
    Drying the phone is of course needed, but you also need to unplug from the charger, and leave the cord to dry, or it will be damaged and corrode.

  • The USB charging port is only 5V, and the resistance of water, even salt water, is high enough that it shouldn't disturb the charging process. I can see why you wouldn't want to submerge your 120V hair dryer in the bathtub with you, but this is a completely different scenario. Am I missing something?
    • The USB charging port is only 5V

      False. [ubergizmo.com]

      Quick Charge 2.0 chargers can support 5V, 9V or 12V (volts) and up to 3A (Ampere) and 60W.

      • If the linked article can't even get basic math right -- 12V * 3A = 36W, not 60W -- I'm not sure how much I should trust the rest of its unsourced numbers.

        It looks like QuickCharge 3.0 will support voltages up to 20V [qualcomm.com], but I don't know when that'll become available in commercial products.

        I think there may be more concern about electrolytically-accellerated corrosion. That can happen even at very low voltages and leakage currents.

        • by dwywit ( 1109409 ) on Sunday March 06, 2016 @05:40PM (#51649729)

          Indeed. Ever read the fine print on a radiator core replacement warranty? It's usually something about "warranty doesn't apply to electrolytic corrosion in the presence of 50 milliamps or greater".

          That's right. Try this test - unscrew the radiator cap, start the car, get out your multimeter, set it to a milliamp range up to 200 mA, put one probe in the coolant, and the other on the engine block. I had a warranty knockback on a replacement core because it developed pinholes within 6 months. I researched it, tested the amount of current, and went back to the installer. He got the deer-in-the-headlights look when I asked him if he had tested the current. It took a bit of arguing, but I got it all sorted.

        • I think there's a different profile that supports 20V @ 3A (60W), probably a copy and paste issue.
          Here's a press release straight from QC [qualcomm.com]

          Quick Charge 2.0 offers four charging voltages at 5V, 9V, 12V and 20V, Quick Charge 3.0 provides flexibility with 200mV increments from 3.6V to 20V

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The USB charging port is only 5V, and the resistance of water, even salt water, is high enough that it shouldn't disturb the charging process.

      It's less than 0.3 ohms per metre for salt water. How far apart are the +5V and GND pins on a micro USB socket ?

      • 0.0032 meters

      • The unit for specific resistance is ohm m, not ohm/m. For conduction paths that have more complicated shapes than wires, it's difficult to tell the resistance without extended calculations, but generally, smaller systems will have higher, not lower, resistances. Moreover, the metal/water interfaces don't behave like simple resistances due to the electrochemical processes there.

      • It's less than 0.3 ohms per metre for salt water. How far apart are the +5V and GND pins on a micro USB socket ?

        Nope it's less than 0.3 ohm-meters which is 30ohm-centmeters. This is a measure of volume resistance. If you want the resistance between the two pins you're going to need a lot more than the distance between them to come up with the answer. Bust out your integrals and logarithms boys.

    • False, plus there is nothing that Samsung can do to prevent electrolysis. This (letting the ports dry before connecting headphones or charger) is probably addressed in the documentation that comes with the phone - I'll find out on Tuesday. If it isn't mentioned in a quick start guide, it sure as hell should be.

    • Electrolysis. Admittedly it would be a small effect at 5V but it wouldn't take long to damage the insides of something as small as a USB connector. Also remember that the distance between pins on the USB cable is 0.25mm meaning you don't need very many ohm meters of liquid resistance to have almost a short circuit given the tight distances and size of conductors.

      But it's the electrochemical process which will kill it. Within a USB connector the phone should have no problem accepting a short between the 5V,

  • Love the magsafe style port on my xperia z3, charges great even when I'm snorkelling!
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Threni ( 635302 )

      Came here to read/make this comment. Apparantly Sony are dropping the mag port. USB sockets are fragile as fuck, and anyone who puts a mag port or some other alternative method of charging that obviates the need to use the usb port a few thousand times over the life of the device (when they only last a few hundred) gets my money.

      • Companies are dropping those ports because of EU regulations requiring phones to use micro-USB compatible chargers.

        • This isn't quite true. The EU regulations require the phones to be able to charge off a universal charger, in this case a USB slot. The wire that runs from the USB slot to the phone can be what ever you want. Otherwise Apple would have issues.

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        Came here to read/make this comment. Apparantly Sony are dropping the mag port. USB sockets are fragile as fuck, and anyone who puts a mag port or some other alternative method of charging that obviates the need to use the usb port a few thousand times over the life of the device (when they only last a few hundred) gets my money.

        Probably because people are complaining about a "proprietary" USB port on those phones incompatible with any cable you can buy cheaply.

        We hear it all the time with Apple - despite A

        • by Threni ( 635302 )

          > How do you think people react when Sony, who ships far less units than Apple will react?

          Why are you speculating about some possible future event? We're talking about the exact opposite; Sony abandoning the proprietary sockets they're already using. I doubt sony cares about people whining on the internet. Anyone remotely involved with the internet in any capacity will be well aware that along with a handful of people writing apps, designing sites and making products there are millions of people who

    • Not polarized.

      Be careful about dropping it into a base while half asleep. Putting it in backwards will shut down the phone and throw an overcurrent on the USB port.

      Did in once on my Z1, they might have fixed it. Bridge rectifiers aren't expensive.

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        Not polarized.

        Be careful about dropping it into a base while half asleep. Putting it in backwards will shut down the phone and throw an overcurrent on the USB port.

        Did in once on my Z1, they might have fixed it. Bridge rectifiers aren't expensive.

        MagSafe isn't polarized, either. A clever arrangement of 6 pins (2 for power, 2 for ground), and an offset set of pins for data will ensure it is possible to charge either orientation, though data will only work one way. If you go with 7 pins, you can make data wor

        • The Sony magnetic connector design is brain dead fucked.

          They could have offset the pins to one side, or used a rectifier circuit. Instead they made it easy to reverse the voltage and tied a power pin direct to the main power of the phone. Why else would it shut the phone down?

  • While water around the connector may be harder to remove and may take longer to evaporate, the S7 also features wireless charging so you can still charge it.
  • A water resistant phone stops you charging it when it's wet.
    All other water resistant phones only tell you not to charge when wet. They all let you do it anyway, corroding the USB connector.

    How is this a bad thing?

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