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Power Technology

Orange County Developer To Install Tesla Batteries In Two Dozen Buildings (computerworld.com) 89

Lucas123 writes: The Irvine Company, a Newport Beach-based real estate developer that is a dominant landlord in Orange County, plans to install Tesla commercial batteries in two dozen of its buildings around Irvine Spectrum and John Wayne Airport. The project is the first of its kind of that size. The batteries will charge during non-peak hours and distribute power to the buildings during peak hours, a process that's expected to save the developer up to 10% of its energy costs or about $1 million a year.
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Orange County Developer To Install Tesla Batteries In Two Dozen Buildings

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  • I've noticed these coming a common topic amongst developers in Southern California. I've had a few ask me about this, just this week. Assuming this isn't just a flavor of the week (what happened to bloom boxes) my question is will the power company always tune there billing in such a way that makes this profitable. Realistically the buildings will utilize the same amount of power, but the peak loads will level out. in short Edison gets less money for the same kilo watts. How long will they let this fly bef

    • In the minds of the utility, by getting customers to shift usage off of peak demand times, or lower the total demand, they don't need to spend money to upgrade generating or transmission / distribution capacity, which is why their billing scheme encourages it.

    • The eventual direction will be real-time pricing, where batteries will be very effective. Right now though, Orange County has a power deficit which means any tricks the utility company can pull off help stabilize things.

      Real-time pricing will eventually make the hours between 1-2 hours before sunset and 8-9PM be most expensive. This will kill the PV incentives.

    • I've noticed these coming a common topic amongst developers in Southern California. I've had a few ask me about this, just this week. Assuming this isn't just a flavor of the week (what happened to bloom boxes) my question is will the power company always tune there billing in such a way that makes this profitable. Realistically the buildings will utilize the same amount of power, but the peak loads will level out. in short Edison gets less money for the same kilo watts. How long will they let this fly before they begin adjusting there billing metric.

      As they bring on more Solar and Wind Power, the bulk of their generation power will be available during the day. As we level the power consumption more and more, eventually we are putting more demand at night on a system that is able to generate more power during the day. So as we start shifting more power to wind and solar, we will eventually see peak pricing being during the nighttime hours, especially if everybody charges their EV at night.

    • Never. Peak load is a huge problem for the power industry. Due to the economics of power generation, we have a huge problem generating power when needed. Basically, power needs shift CONSTANTLY and we have to change how much we generate on the fly, and that is not cheap.

      The best power sources tend to be variable themselves - solar, wind, etc. Solar for example does not work at all during the night. We don't control them. The second best power sources tend to involve huge infrastructure that are exp

  • Do the numbers really work for this? If they do, why isn't the power company buying up Tesla's production for the foreseeable future?
    • by Jeremi ( 14640 )

      Do the numbers really work for this?

      I have no idea.

      If they do, why isn't the power company buying up Tesla's production for the foreseeable future?

      How much money do you think Tesla would demand in return for shutting down its electric car business, given that it is an electric car company? I'm guessing it would be enough that a power company interested in battery storage would be better off finding their battery supply elsewhere.

    • by ledow ( 319597 )

      Notice that it only mentions savings on electricity. While this is indeed a long-term saving, it's not taking account of anything to do with the purchase price and maintenance of the system.

      I can save you 100% on your electricity for the next year. You just have to buy my huge-arse battery, and pay for a "recharge" once a year. Cost: More than you pay for electricity in a year.

  • If not, this is a waste, like changing dollars to euros and back again. You will consume more on the long run.

  • I mean, they make sense in a car, because they are light, but for a building a lead-acid battery would make more sense, wouldn't it?

    • by swb ( 14022 )

      If "in a building" translates to "a lot of space" then nickel-iron batteries would make the most sense, since they have a very long lifespan and tolerate deep discharges. But I think their max discharge rate is lower than others, meaning you'd need a larger space for the array.

      I think lead acid would suffer from similar issues due to the need to keep maximum discharge depth above 50%.

      Lithium batteries have a good discharge profile and take less space.

  • Seems we get a slashvertisement every day pimping one or another of his businesses - Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity.

A penny saved is a penny to squander. -- Ambrose Bierce

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