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HP Businesses Printer Software Hardware IT News

HP To Jettison Up To 30,000 Jobs As Part of Spinoff 273

An anonymous reader writes: Hewlett-Packard says its upcoming spinoff of its technology divisions focused on software, consulting and data analysis will eliminate up to 30,000 jobs. The cuts announced Tuesday will be within the newly formed Hewlett Packard Enterprise, which is splitting from the Palo Alto, California company's personal computer and printing operation. "The new reductions amount to about 10 percent of the new company's workforce, and will save about $2.7 billion in annual operating costs." The split is scheduled to be completed by the end of next month. "The head of the group, Mike Nefkens, outlined a plan under which it is cutting jobs in what he called 'high-cost countries' and moving them to low-cost countries. He said that by the end of HP Enterprise’s fiscal year 2018, only 40 percent of the group’s work force will be located in high-cost countries."
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HP To Jettison Up To 30,000 Jobs As Part of Spinoff

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @08:14PM (#50528779)
    This is still Carly's fault
    • slap those resumes up all over town, leave them gasping from their own poison gas.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward
        You sound like a HP product owner. Or maybe a former employee. Or maybe shareholder?
    • ...see, Meg ain't doing much better either
      • by ArmoredDragon ( 3450605 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @10:45PM (#50529309)

        That isn't a meg or a carly thing really. This has been in the works for a long time, pretty much since the HP touchpad flop. Basically the purpose behind the split was because the consumer division (printers, desktops, touchpad) would frequently drag the enterprise division (servers, networking gear, storage gear, which generally does pretty well) into the mud along with its routinely shitty performance.

        They likewise believe that if they have a more stable stock for the enterprise division, it would be easier to attract investors.

        • by ksheff ( 2406 )

          If the Touchpad was a flop, what do you call writing off $5 billion after buying Autonomy?

          It's too bad they didn't bother updating the hardware on the Touchpad. It would have been current had it been released a year earlier. The 7" Touchpad Go would have been nice too. :(

          • If the Touchpad was a flop, what do you call writing off $5 billion after buying Autonomy?

            It's too bad they didn't bother updating the hardware on the Touchpad. It would have been current had it been released a year earlier. The 7" Touchpad Go would have been nice too. :(

            I'd say it was a pure corruption play. Clearly someone(s) got that $5B. The touchpad was pure tragedy - WebOS sounds like the second coming of BeOS - a great OS with great ideas that just came a bit too late to the party (and didn't have the blessing of the corporate elite).

            Also keep in mind Microsoft's Skype acquisition (which in hindsight doesn't seem as bad - if MS would actually merge Skype into Windows or Office...) - the common factor being that since the money being used to purchase the offshore c

  • by turkeydance ( 1266624 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @08:15PM (#50528787)
    most execs get a bonus based on stock price. if it ain't happening, the execs MAKE it happen. paid for by 30K pink-slips.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      What is interesting, these guys are motivated mostly by their short-to-medium term gains, without tracking bigger picture ( in a way they act very rationally ). Of course, not all optimizations for short-term may not necessary be good in longer term course ( like asus/dell story , or other ideas whereas engineering and manufacturing capabilities are moved to other countries ). Not sure there is any way around it unless understood and acted upon on higher levels of decision process (which seems unlikely, aft

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      "Most of the cuts will occur in HPâ(TM)s long-troubled Enterprise Services unit and may be offset by new hires in that unit."

      E.S. is basically what they are selling off. Most of the jobs will be bought by an outsourcing company. It was on this site not too long ago, and in the summary so you could avoid the article.

      I know at least 500 people from HPES, and there are overpaid and underpaid people. Guess who gets the axe? That's right, the overpaid people. Not the "expensive and worth it" but overpaid.

      I'

      • Related: 1h ago I was called by a HP representative to get me hired. My interview is Friday.
        Note: I live in a low-cost country and HP has been hiring like crazy, 20% of my co-workers have already moved to HP. They pay slightly better than my current employer (which is arguably bigger than HP globally but have a shitty salary process) and from what I've heard they have a good working environment.

      • by gweihir ( 88907 )

        Quite often the "troublemakers" are also gotten rid off in such a step. You know, those people that insist on a strategic view, that want R&D, that want IT security to not suck, etc. These are usually those that ensure a tech company has a future.

      • "Most of the cuts will occur in HPâ(TM)s long-troubled Enterprise Services unit and may be offset by new hires in that unit."

        E.S. is basically what they are selling off. Most of the jobs will be bought by an outsourcing company. It was on this site not too long ago, and in the summary so you could avoid the article.

        I know at least 500 people from HPES, and there are overpaid and underpaid people. Guess who gets the axe? That's right, the overpaid people. Not the "expensive and worth it" but overpaid.

        I'm guessing lots of middle management cuts, where people built a team to look important but do little.

        Job cuts aren't always bad, sometimes the job should never have existed.

        How else can you do the opposite of a merger and save money? Hiring cheap replacements is a very tiny part of the answer. Take your knee jerk cynicism elsewhere, and meanwhile learn before posting. All if it was posted right here, in dorkslush, so you didn't have to exert much energy at all.

        Here, from the article itself. Think of it as a middle finger to your post, or think about it as unfounded knee jerking, whichever suits you best.

        Most of the cuts will occur in HP’s long-troubled Enterprise Services unit and may be offset by new hires in that unit. The head of the group, Mike Nefkens, outlined a plan under which it is cutting jobs in what he called “high-cost countries” and moving them to low-cost countries.

      • You are spot on. I worked for HP (well, technically, I worked for their 3rd party Facilities Management company who ran their Data Centers for them) for 3 years. I was initially with EDS, and was with them through the transition to HP. I can tell you from direct experience that you're exactly right with regard to the "legacy EDS" section of the company.

        The number of old timers who were just hanging on in the old EDS world was staggering. I think it was a product of EDS getting really big during the
    • by gweihir ( 88907 )

      Indeed. Anything for their bonus and fuck the company and its employees. These people are dangerous psychos without even a shred of honor or integrity.

  • The old game (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @08:35PM (#50528865)

    This is the old game. They bring in some skilled foreigners "via H1-B" (from Malaysia, India, Vietnam, etc). They work alongside the American team. The managers tell the engineers to get them up to speed. A year later those folks go back to the home country where it is cheaper. the Americans are expected to work internationally as a team with them.

    Next, coincidentally, the CEO announces an option for employees to get a payout for those that would like to leave. A few months later, the CEO announces job cuts typically 10% and focuses on the mid level management and engineering teams that taught the H1-B folks.

    This happens all the time. I was glad I took the payout and saw the writing on the wall.
    Remember if you are expected to teach foreigners your work and they overlap your team's skill set, within a year or two you will be gone.

    • Exactamundo... apk (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I saw the same TOO many times, & did something about it: I got into my OWN business where the product literally can't be "built overseas" & everyone needs it - It literally allowed me to ALMOST completely stop working as a software engineer/programmer analyst/network admin completely (actually, I could totally stop, & I've proven that to myself for the 2008-2013 period as a test of sorts... wasn't easy, scared the hell out of me taking that risk, but I wanted... no NEEDED to know I could pull it

      • by lucm ( 889690 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:17PM (#50529009)

        Best advice I could give ANYONE? Don't get into a "want" line of business - get into a NEED line instead (people wanting is VERY SECONDARY to needing).

        Excellent advice. That's how Apple made truckloads of cash: because people NEED iPhones and iPads, and why Safeway got in financial trouble (since people merely "want" food).

        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Best advice I could give ANYONE? Don't get into a "want" line of business - get into a NEED line instead (people wanting is VERY SECONDARY to needing).

          Excellent advice. That's how Apple made truckloads of cash: because people NEED iPhones and iPads, and why Safeway got in financial trouble (since people merely "want" food).

          APK doesn't respond to posts that invalidate what he wants to believe. He pretends not to notice those posts.

          He'll probably notice this one though, rant about this and that, etc.

        • He has an overall point of the needs vs wants in life. Markets that lean toward the "needs" tend to be rather stable forms of employment. For example, please see agriculture. OTOH, "wants" based markets are risky, yet can be very rewarding and profitable during boom times, yet suck wind during a bust. For example, please see Las Vegas.

          • by lucm ( 889690 )

            Markets that lean toward the "needs" tend to be rather stable forms of employment. For example, please see agriculture. OTOH, "wants" based markets are risky, yet can be very rewarding and profitable during boom times, yet suck wind during a bust. For example, please see Las Vegas.

            Are you aware that the US government is spending on average 97 billions PER YEAR on subsidies and misc support programs for farmers? That's the only reasons farms haven't collapsed.

            Meanwhile, gaming and tourism in Las Vegas generates a cool 50 billions every year. That's about 14 billions in wages that benefit 40% of the Southern Nevada workforce. And if you look at the economic growth curve, you'll see pretty much a stable increase over the last century.

            "Common sense economics" is never a good alternative

        • by cfalcon ( 779563 )

          Your counterexample is concise, but is it generally applicable? I mean, how many companies have tried to be Apple, and failed? And there sure are a lot of successful grocery stores.

          I'm not saying you are incorrect, merely that your example doesn't make a good case. You'd want to look at the median case of companies that tried to fill "wants" versus "needs", by some metric that, uh, you get to run by APK. Hopefully you aren't in his hosts file...

      • by PopeRatzo ( 965947 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:52PM (#50529139) Journal

        Don't get into a "want" line of business - get into a NEED line instead

        In other words: HVAC.

  • by dejitaru ( 4258167 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @08:42PM (#50528899)
    I've owned two HP computers, basically my first one that wasn't a hand-me-down in 1997 (HP Pavilion 8140) and my most recent one I got this year (Envy Pheonix). So I decided to read up on the history of HP's CEOs and it seems that they have really lost their way after Lewis Platt resigned back in 1999. It says a lot on what happened to the company based on the Wikipedia entry on Platt's page:

    "Late in his tenure, Platt was often criticized by investors and some HP executives for focusing on progressive values and long-term results. Platt's detractors said that company needed a more cold-blooded competitiveness and higher octane leadership to succeed, that his "pragmatic, nothing-fancy approach" seemed out of touch with the "go-go demands of the late 1990s," and that he had failed to capitalize on the Internet boom."

    So the investors and executives cared more for the quick buck instead of long-term growth of the company. What a shame...

    • by lucm ( 889690 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:29PM (#50529053)

      So the investors and executives cared more for the quick buck instead of long-term growth of the company. What a shame...

      This is how Wall Street works. Investors no longer hold stock for a long time, merely cashing in dividends. They want the stock price to go up, quick. So they vote for board members who will promote that agenda. Then board members hire a management team that can deliver the agenda. The stock price goes up, the investors sell to other investors. Rince and repeat.

      What is amazing is that the investors who have the most influence in this process are institutional investors (such as pension funds) who need to make a profit with their investments to meet their own needs (such as paying out pensions). So in order to make a profit, those large investors drive a short-term agenda that, globally, hurts their customer base. With one hand they give you a 8% return in your 401(k), with the other one they drive your employer (and many others) to the brink of destruction by always forcing executives to think short term.

    • I wonder what's left of HP that anyone should bother? The MRI equipment, oscilloscopes and other high end electronic instrumentation equipment - things that HP was renowned for - are today a part of Agilent. What HP had left was EDS (and Mphasis), and the computer division.

      Now that HPES is spun off, what's really left? PCs? One can get better PCs - either from Microsoft itself - the Surface Pros, or from the Taiwan guys - Acer, Asus, Lenovo, et al. If one's talking servers, why prefer HP to De

      • by TheSync ( 5291 )

        I wonder what's left of HP that anyone should bother?

        HP is currently the largest vendor for my employer, we buy a ton of servers. HP also has "Moonshot" [hp.com], the workload-optimized blade project. And they have a private cloud offering [hpcloud.com].

        Cisco used to be our largest vendor (switches, specialty gear, UCS). For the time being, HP is very competitive on servers and switches.

  • by BenJeremy ( 181303 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @08:45PM (#50528913)

    ...there is no longer a shortage of STEM resources in the US.

    Mission Accomplished!

    • It gets better, when Meg Whitman runs for president, she can also tell us all how she created 30k jobs! (In China and Malaysia)

    • It sounds like the layoffs are mostly HP Enterprise people though. You know, IT drones. Not Science and Engineering people.

      HP will never recover from the Cold War era when the government would spend infinite amounts of money for the absolute best quality. That doesn't happen anymore. Even Agilent needs to be cost-concious now. The boomers who climbed aboard the company in the 80's thinking they had jobs forever in the back labs have for the most part figured it out, but they're still inclined to blame

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @08:55PM (#50528943)

    "The purge announced Tuesday will occur within the newly formed Hewlett Packard Enterprise, a bundle of technology divisions focused on software, consulting and data analysis that is splitting off from the company's personal computer and printing operations."

    Wha? They are keeping consumer business, spinning off the Enterprise business, and it will be moving to low wage nations?!?! I thought enterprise was the high paying american jobs, and consumer was the cheap, crappy stuff that would get outsourced to China?

    • by lucm ( 889690 )

      Reminds me of that bit from George Carlin about gun control...

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

    • Yes, the consumer stuff is the cheap products outsourced from China. However what they probably are doing is keeping a small workforce in high wage countries to interface with the enterprise customers. They will gather requirements, do the installs, etc. All of the actual development work will get shipped off to lower wage countries. So most of the people that never dealt with the customers are the ones that got cut.

      • At least at my site it can't be moved. It's not feasible to move several mainframes, and the last time HP cut too deep it ended up with a giant fine from the FAA for a 45 minute outage. Apparently that lesson wasn't taken to heart.
    • And that is why you are simply no CEO material. Too much logical thinking, not enough setting up company for failure and awaiting golden parachutes.

  • Which one's the printer and which one's the ink?
  • by Kohath ( 38547 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:14PM (#50529003)

    They should keep paying 30,000 people they don't need. Shouldn't they?

    • by PRMan ( 959735 )
      They are rehiring them in "cheaper" countries.
      • by TheGratefulNet ( 143330 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @10:49PM (#50529327)


        They are rehiring them in "cheaper" countries.

        you 20 and 30somethings in software out there: take heed! you have, at best, 5-10 years before all software is outsourced.

        your software degree? will be useless and you won't even be able to pay your student loans out.

        this country (US) is very quickly going to hell. we all see it, don't we? some are more insulated than others, but its spreading like a disease. the ceo's are robbing us of what made us great; they are stealing all the profits and keeping us around just long enough but not longer than necessary. we are all short timers now.

        still think that unions are not needed? lets check back again in 5 yrs and see how the sw industry is doing in the US. my guess is that it will be way worse as time goes on. can anyone show me any signs of it getting better?

        since ceo's are patted on the back each time they do a mass-firing of US workers, it will be you, sooner or later. you don't think so, but you just wait. sadly, no one wants to form a union in IT and so we'll all hang separately since we REFUSE to hang together.

        really breaks my heart to see us all taken for chumps like this. american ceo's are pond scum but they are powerful land-owning money-keeping pond scum.

        • by TheSync ( 5291 )

          According to Glassdoor, there are 104,828 openings for software engineers in the US, and the average base salary is $98,074.

          Just because one company is re-orging doesn't mean the entire industry is going under. There will continue to be plenty of new software engineering jobs both inside and outside of the US.

          It is true that the number of people working as electrical engineers in the US declined by 29,000 last year, but the number of software developers increased by nearly 12%, or a gain of 132,000 jobs.

          Th

        • since ceo's are patted on the back each time they do a mass-firing of US workers, it will be you, sooner or later. you don't think so, but you just wait. sadly, no one wants to form a union in IT and so we'll all hang separately since we REFUSE to hang together.

          As someone who worked in a 75% union company with more than 1000 employees, part of a multinational group, I can tell you first hand from experience that the existence of a union has done nothing for us. More than half of us are standing in line waiting for government handouts, me, I left the country to look for work elsewhere.

          The only thing the union achieved in all it's years was protect slackers who considered sick leave to be an "entitlement" that they could take whenever they wanted, and then complaine

        • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

          Like manufacturing, there will be a lot of low end software jobs moved overseas. Like manufacturing, it is possible to keep a large work force of high end developers employed. Maybe not in the US where short term profit is everything, but you can move to places like Germany where you will get a similar or better standard of living and this type of outlook. Germany still has very strong manufacturing.

      • by Kohath ( 38547 )

        So they should just keep paying extremely high taxes and bay area salaries rather than try to find a better deal?

  • by ErichTheRed ( 39327 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:27PM (#50529043)

    IBM has been doing these kinds of layoffs for decades. If you read the article, it looks like they're planning on rehiring some of the same positions. This can be either one of the following:
    - Jettisoning "expensive" older, experienced workers that just happen to not be working on today's buzzword set (cloud and mobile in today's case) and replacing them with fresh young "talented" Millenials
    - Dumping everyone overboard and just moving the work wholesale to India or similar low cost countries.

    This is the MO for IBM nowadays. They're dumping hardware, but they're also trying to turn themselves into some kind of white shoe management consulting firm. To do this, you need to raise profit margins on service contracts, and this is the obvious choice,

    I've worked in some very big companies and I've seen my share of dead wood. I've seen managers who no longer have a team but are still somehow on the payroll, I've seen people who literally do nothing all day because their job has been taken over by someone else, and all the other fun/scary examples. But when you're talking about 30,000 employees, that's not all dead wood. If I had to guess, they're killing off the remainder of the EDS guys who know mainframe stuff inside and out. I work in the airline industry and I'm sure those experienced guys look like a juicy target to an MBA or accountant, regardless of how much they know and how awful their Indian, Vietnamese or other replacement is going to be.

  • by dpbsmith ( 263124 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:27PM (#50529045) Homepage

    The loss of HP, as it was from perhaps 1950 to 2000, wasn't just the loss of a brand or a manufacturer, it was the loss of an art form, a craft, a cherished part of engineering culture.

    Their stuff was just so damn good, all of it.

    A little detail that isn't often mentioned. In the 1980s or thereabouts, everything HP advertised was real. They never played the vaporware game, they never cheated just a bit on timing the ads. If you saw the ad in a magazine, it was finished, it was real, you could order it, it would arrive in a week or two--and it would work the way it was supposed to and meet all the specs. This, in a day when their competitors would run ads based on models or empty cases up to six months before the product was finished.

    Using an incandescent light bulb as a feedback element in their audio oscillators was sheer elegance.

    All their instruments were works of art. All of them had front panels that today's user interface designers ought to be studying. All the groupings made sense, almost every control was individually designed to perform its intended function. HP instruments looked good, felt good, were easy to use, and did exactly what they were supposed to do.

    The first LaserJet was a revelation, and it worked perfectly, The first DeskJet was in many ways even more amazing--a 300 dpi printer for $600 when laser printers cost $3,000 and every other $600 machine was about 80 dpi if you were lucky.

    HP's desk calculators were sweet, and the HP-35 was just a revelation when it came out. Everyone was proud of being able to do a square root, and here's this beautiful thing. Did everything a slide rule could do, everything, to ten-place accuracy when a slide rule would get you at most three. And, again unlike the competition--most particularly unlike TI--the math was impeccable, no glitches, no odd cases--they knew their numerical analysis and they got it right. RPN seemed weird, but at least it was consistent.The competition could never get this right--they would claim that you entered it "algebraically" but you would key in 30, then "sin" instead of sin(30).

    The loss of the engineering days of HP was the loss of a whole discipline, a whole body of corporate memory on how to do things right. An irreparable loss of know-how. And it was engineering in the full sense of the word--these weren't self-indulgent overengineered toys, they were priced competitively and sold against competition in a real marketplace--and they were still so good.

    • Using an incandescent light bulb as a feedback element in their audio oscillators was sheer elegance.

      I'd forgotten all about that. Thanks for the trip down memory lane.

    • by labnet ( 457441 )

      Remember that HP (The real HP that made electronic test equipment) was spun off into Agilent which was recently spun off again into Keysight Technoogies.

      (2009)
      HP -> HP (Computers, Printers etc)
      -> Agilent (Life Sciences, Electronic Test)

      (2014)
      Agilent -> Agilent (Life Sciences etc)
      -> Keysight Technologies (Electronic Test)

      So when you talk to engineers about HP, we think Agilent and now Keysight as having the original DNA of HP

    • by TheGratefulNet ( 143330 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @10:57PM (#50529359)

      I collect, repair and use classic test gear. I have a good collection of tektronix, hp, keithley, fluke (pretty much all 'just names' at this point; danaher ruined most of them, sigh). the old stuff is amazing, almost magic. the new stuff is overpriced (even by hp standards) and is not designed to last. on the eevblog forum, there was a big thread about an agilent high-end handheld DMM that bricked itself during a fw update and hp's reply was 'sorry, we can't fix it; its not fixable by design'. really??? what the fuck! no backup boot block and no way to jtag fix it? you can't be serious. big stink on eevblog and it taught many of us that we should now avoid hp^H^Hagilent^H^Hkeysight for test/meas gear.

      the stuff they make now will never be called 'classic'. its all disposble and even the chinese scopes like rigol and its ilk beat the snot out of the old school brand names, that pretty much invented the tech, 50 or more years ago.

      I interviewed at hp in palo alto a few months ago. it took months, they dragged their feet, they could not decide, they could not define what they wanted and after nearly a whole day there, they gave me a thumbs down with no reason given. months of 'we want you!' bullshit from the recruiter only to find that the team does not even know what it wants.

      you'd have to be nuts to apply to hp (or amazon, for that matter) these days. perhaps I dodged a bullet by not getting the job at hp.

      gotta say, though, the inside of HP looked quite dreary. lame-ass open office, no space for personal stuff, not even cups in the break room (seriously; I had to ask to borrow someone's coffee mug at their desk when I 'dared' ask for some water to keep near me during my interview.)

      HP is dead. parts of it don't know it yet, but they are 'dead men walking'.

      really a shame. HP was a tier-1 company in their day. when I was starting out, working for DEC or HP or Sun or SGI was the best place to be (all high end unix and unix-like workstation companies and all were great to work for back in the day). now, what do we have? essentially none of those computer companies are around anymore. their culture, which was a valuable part of who they were, has all washed away, as well. the 'hp way' died 15 years ago or more.

  • by Proudrooster ( 580120 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:32PM (#50529063) Homepage

    What do we need?
    STEM Jobs!

    Where do we need them?
    Cheap labor cost countries!

    What STEM jobs can Americans do?
    Train their foreign replacements!

    What can congress do!
    More H1-B's, we need cheap STEM labor and we need it now.

    What can you do?
    Don't be a lowly middle class American, be a CEO of a STEM company and outsource your way to quarterly profits. If that doesn't work, reorganize and break up business units and sell them off. Maybe hookup with a corporate raider like Ichan and rack up a lot of debt, pay large dividends to shareholders then go bankrupt.

  • by ChesterRafoon ( 4205907 ) on Tuesday September 15, 2015 @09:41PM (#50529097)
    When GM spun off their component plants into their own public corporation (Delphi), almost all of their production was in the US. Now, after a bankruptcy that completely fucked the salaried staff (as in degreed engineers) out of their pensions, nearly all of Delphi's manufacturing operations are offshore. This is exactly what the two "new" HP entitites will do - stumble briefly, bankruptcy, throw the pensions off to the government (like Delphi did) and move everything - and I mean EVERYTHING offshore. Good luck with buying gear and getting support from that dysfunctional monster.
  • Amazingly, the VP idiots who decided to fire the 30,000 people will all get raises that add up to the exact salary of the 30,000 people.

    This is all a complete coincidence.

    • by TheSync ( 5291 )

      Meg Whitman's salary in 2015 is $1.5 million, only 16 times the average $90K HP salary.

      Her overall compensation package valued at $19.6 million (including a stock award valued at $8.1 million, stock options worth $5.3 million, a $4.3 million incentive award and $295,400 in perks, including $251,000 for personal use of private aircraft). This would be 218 times the average $90K HP salary.

  • ...outlined a plan under which it is cutting jobs in what he called 'high-cost countries' and moving them to low-cost countries. He said that by the end of HP Enterprise’s fiscal year 2018, only 40 percent of the group’s work force will be located in high-cost countries."

    It's just an easier way to say that they don't like their workers having any freedom.

  • They've jettisoned what's left of EDS. Another HP investment that's turned to shit although EDS was going downhill when HP bought them.

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