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Hardware Technology

Toshiba Announces 3D Flash With 48 Layers 42

Lucas123 writes: Admitting it has bumped up against a 15 nanometer process wall, Toshiba announced it's focusing its efforts on three dimensional NAND using its Bit Cost Scalable technology (PDF) in order to increase capacity. It has dedicated a Japanese fab plant to it and developed 48-level 3D NAND, which bumps density up 33% over previous 3D NAND flash. The new 3D NAND will be able to store 128Gb of data per chip (16GB). Samsung has been mass producing 32-layer, triple-level cell (TLC) 3D NAND since last October and has incorporated it into some of its least expensive SSDs. Yesterday, Micron and Intel announced their own 32-layer 3D TLC NAND, which they claimed will lead to 10TB SSDs. While Toshiba's 3D NAND is multi-level cell (meaning it stores two bits per transistor versus three), the company does plan on developing a TLC version. Toshiba said it's not abandoning 15nm floating gate flash, but it will focus those efforts on lower capacity applications.
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Toshiba Announces 3D Flash With 48 Layers

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    That's a lot of clothing for a guy who could just jog down to the Sahara in a couple minutes.

    Captcha: exertion

  • by Obfuscant ( 592200 ) on Friday March 27, 2015 @06:18PM (#49358103)
    But you have to wear goofy looking glasses to use it.
  • Man, porn is driving the craziest shit.

  • by erice ( 13380 ) on Friday March 27, 2015 @06:47PM (#49358251) Homepage

    It is excellent tech but they can't stack the cells indefinitely. The approach uses pillars of cells with no cross wiring. All the control circuitry is in one plane at the bottom. This makes it cheap because they only have to mask and etch once: all the way down to the planer circuitry on the bottom. The downside is you can only go so high before the control circuitry can no longer detect the signal from the top layers [3dincites.com] They could add another layer of control circuitry but the principle cost of making a chip is the masking and etching so it may be just as cheap (and definitely easier) to just make two chips.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 27, 2015 @07:43PM (#49358517)

    I think Toshiba are a bit late to the party here. I'm pretty sure Adobe's Flash has been 3D and included the ability to have many layers as you like for ages. Also, surely Toshiba can't release it's own version of Flash and give it the same name, right?

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I'm tired of throwing away several Intel or Samsung SSDs every week. My last set of nine Samsung 840s that I installed in development desktops lasted less than 90 days before they wore-out. Yes, we're hard on drives, but it's ridiculous how much time our IT department is throwing away due to the fact SSD drives are considered disposable and die so quickly. They're crap. There's a reason you still see 15k spinning rust in data centers. MLC SSDs are garbage that should not be legal to be sold.

    • by Bengie ( 1121981 )
      So you're writing about 10TB/day for 90 days strait? That's impressive.
    • Then try SLC Enterprise SSD's.
      • by AcquaCow ( 56720 )

        There's no reason to use SLC these days really... Once you start writing in large density with intent on retaining data for some period of time, you'll be striping that data across 10-100 SSDs... The combined wear-life even with cheaper MLC drives still puts you up over 100 years for most products.

        It's pretty easy to take the Drive Writes Per Day (DWPD) or PetaBytes Written (PBW) for the drives and add them all up... most any install will 10+ drives will outlast any standard 5 year hardware refresh cycle.

        Di

        • Then what do you recommend the OP to which I was replying ?

          I'm tired of throwing away several Intel or Samsung SSDs every week. My last set of nine Samsung 840s that I installed in development desktops lasted less than 90 days before they wore-out. Yes, we're hard on drives, but it's ridiculous how much time our IT department is throwing away due to the fact SSD drives are considered disposable and die so quickly. They're crap. There's a reason you still see 15k spinning rust in data centers. MLC SSDs are

    • by MrL0G1C ( 867445 )

      WTH were you doing to them? I call BS.

    • by Misagon ( 1135 )

      From what I have heard, the Samsung 840 is scandalously bad and most other types should fare better.

  • SSD $/GB is gonna be going down across the board. It's nice to see the competition heat up.

    -Matt

  • Right now, I would more interested in 48-layer MLC NAND from Toshiba than 32-layer TLC NAND if I can get it for the same price.

    Samsung's TLC NAND in their "840 EVO" SSDs have had problems with performance dropping significantly after a couple of months of use. Samsung issued a "fix" with a firmware update, but after a couple of months more many users of the drives experienced choppy performance. Apparently the problem would be inherent in the TLC NAND that they use.

    • Well, it won't be the same price - it requires a more complex fab process - but yeah. Consumer MLC drives have proven themselves to be robust and reliable, for the most part. TLC still seems to be a bridge a little too far.

      I'd like to see Tech Report re-run their endurance test with current drive models. The only "problem" is that drives are so good now that by the time the best model fails and we get the final score, none of them will be on the market any more.

//GO.SYSIN DD *, DOODAH, DOODAH

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