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HP Portables Windows Hardware

HP Introduces Sub-$100 Windows Tablet 182

jfruh writes While Windows-based tablets haven't exactly set the world on fire, Microsoft hasn't given up on them, and its hardware partners haven't either. HP has announced a series of Windows tablets, with the 7-inch low-end model, the Stream 7, priced at $99. The Stream brand is also being used for low-priced laptops intended to compete with Chromebooks (which HP also sells). All are running Intel chips and full Windows, not Windows RT.
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HP Introduces Sub-$100 Windows Tablet

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  • by GarretSidzaka ( 1417217 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @12:49PM (#48028203)

    sort of want

  • Will it run Linux? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by wirefarm ( 18470 ) <[ten.cdmm] [ta] [mij]> on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @12:50PM (#48028217) Homepage

    I would be interested, if I didn't have to run Windows on it.

    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus ( 1223518 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @12:57PM (#48028271) Journal

      I would be interested, if I didn't have to run Windows on it.

      You might want to be a bit careful, some of the ultra-cheap Windows devices are UEFI only; but 32 bit, which freaks most Linux installers out; but these are not Windows RT machines, so they will not be cryptographically locked out.

      Time, and experimentation, will tell how good compatibility actually is; but it should be markedly easier than any Windows RT device, and honestly quite probably easier than doing a Linux port to a lot of common Android devices(yes, bodging a headless debian userland or something onto an Android system is easy; but getting X, using a mainline kernel, or not using bionic, less so...)

    • As long as you can get drivers you should be able to. It's an x86 rather then ARM based so Microsoft does require the BIOS to support both secure and unsecure booting. If HP hasn't provided a special button press to get into the BIOS during startup (like holding down F1 or DEL, or Volume + like on the Surface) you can get there from Windows now. Boot into Windows 8 and then use Recovery from the start menu to reboot the system into Advanced Recovery mode (sort of a graphical version of the old text menu whe

    • by binarylarry ( 1338699 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @01:47PM (#48028795)

      Internally, this tablet was codenamed the "Desperation."

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @12:51PM (#48028227)

    For less than TI sells a calculator.

    • And you can get a very nice RPN calculator app for free.

      • And it still wouldn't be allowed for tests
        • by Nyder ( 754090 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @03:32PM (#48029725) Journal

          And it still wouldn't be allowed for tests

          In my days we used pencil & paper to do math. We had to *gasp* actually work the problem out.

          My days sucked.

          • by tibit ( 1762298 )

            My worry has been that kids in grade schools waste a lot of time doing menial arithmetic while they could have been - gasp - actually learning more advanced math instead. Like, you know, shit that one can use later in college. I really wish I didn't need to do all that long division/multiplication etc. - it was really pointless. I used to believe that it was good. I now know better. The whole reason for menial arithmetic was the Victorian-era-called-need for civil servants - back when nobody had a spreadshe

          • I also grew up in a time where I had to do things by hand with pencil and paper. I remember learning long division, but I don't think I could do it even if I had hours to try to figure it out. We should teach kids about these old methods and the theories behind them but we shouldn't be wasting time teaching them the method and making them memorize how to do it. They will never do long division by hand in their entire life.

            Although it's important to teach theory and the methods behind things, what you talkin

  • by MetalliQaZ ( 539913 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @12:53PM (#48028245)

    If it can handle media-heavy social websites, then I think this would be a winner for my wife and others like her.

    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus ( 1223518 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @01:11PM (#48028413) Journal
      The laptops are based on the Celeron N2840, with 2GB of RAM. I can't seem to find much in the way of benchmarks; but I suspect that they are surprisingly adequate. What is a bit surprising is that the the N2840 [intel.com] has a quoted tray price of $107, so either Intel is cutting HP one hell of a deal, or I don't even want to know what HP cobbled the rest of the system together from...
      • by afidel ( 530433 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @01:17PM (#48028497)

        They're likely getting a subsidy from MS paid for by future Office365/OneDrive revenues plus I'm sure this has Bing integration so there's some ad revenue to split.

      • The "recommended consumer price" for someone purchasing a tray of cpus is $107. If you were working on a prototype design or a very limited production run, you'd buy just a tray of 1000, not the craploads that HP is going to buy.
        • How many zeros is a crapload? 4 or 5?
        • This mistake is made time and time again when people do a teardown on something like the latest phone,tablet, or gaming console and try to figure out how much profit the manufacturer is making (or losing) on each device. The reality is that unless you are actually working for the manufacturer or supplier and in charge of arranging the deal about how much things will cost, you have no idea what the price of these components are. You get huge discounts when you order 100,000 of an item. And it doesn't just
      • by dj245 ( 732906 )

        The laptops are based on the Celeron N2840, with 2GB of RAM. I can't seem to find much in the way of benchmarks; but I suspect that they are surprisingly adequate. What is a bit surprising is that the the N2840 [intel.com] has a quoted tray price of $107, so either Intel is cutting HP one hell of a deal, or I don't even want to know what HP cobbled the rest of the system together from...

        I don't think that tray price has much basis in reality. The "$107" N2840 [cpu-world.com] looks, at least on the face, to be not vastly different from the "$86" 1037U [cpu-world.com]. If Biostar can sell a motherboard + 1037U + heatsink + fan for $79.99 [amazon.com], it doesn't take much of a stretch to think maybe these prices are just "list" prices with no basis in reality. Biostar is just selling a bare motherboard so there can't be any Microsoft kickbacks or ad revenue.

  • I guess Microsoft's plan to charge nothing for small screen form factors is having a bit on a effect. Even 20 bucks would be a significant impact on that price. At that price, there'd be enough people to see if you get a Linux distro on it, and it's close enough to cheap android levels.

    For me, it's cool, because I'm more versed in Windows development and since it's full Windows, I can easily install whatever the heck I want on it (no developer unlock, etc, etc). Save up, get a few and just have them around

    • At that price, there'd be enough people to see if you get a Linux distro on it, and it's close enough to cheap android levels.

      What? The last four 7" Android pads I bought were $35 each. $99 is 3x the cost so I am not sure I would call it close to the cheap android levels.

      Hell, at $35 I bought one for everyone in the house, plus two floaters to be used in the living room and the kitchen. They are handy to have around. At $99 with windows installed, they can keep them.

      • by ndykman ( 659315 )

        A fair point. I was thinking the Android price point was more around 69-79. Clearly I haven't been shopping extensively.

      • Yeah, but those cheap android tablets can't run full Windows applications either. This runs the full x86 version of Windows. That gives you a lot of power you wouldn't get from cheap Android tablets. If it's like most other x86 devices and has HDMI and USB, then you could conceivably just hook it up to an existing monitor+keyboard+mouse and use it like a traditional desktop.
  • by Animats ( 122034 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @01:07PM (#48028371) Homepage

    Why not? There have been $30 Android tablets available in Shentzen for a year or two.

    • Lol, $35 at Fry's electronics down the street from my house. So no need to go to china for them.

      • Yeah but those $35 android tablets are truly awful. Single core, 256mb ram, 8gb storage, bad touchscreen, can't run any games because it's too slow. Spend $150+ and you get quad core, 2gb, 32gb and a much better touchscreen.
        • by Anon-Admin ( 443764 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @02:25PM (#48029163) Journal

          The $35 ones I bought were dual core, 1024mb ram, 2g internal storage, 10 point capacitive touch, with a micro-SD slot that will take up to a 32gig card.

          So far they play all the games and run just about anything we care to put on them. Though We use them for browsing and as the remote control for the OpenElec XBMC/Raspberry Pi units.

    • Yeah but the Windows tablets have a full version of Windows 8.1 and can presumably run most every Windows desktop app. Windows 8.1 itself is $106 at Amazon so HP must be getting a hell of a discount from MS.

  • by jones_supa ( 887896 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @01:12PM (#48028431)

    There's also a $81 tablet coming from PiPO [neowin.net].

    "Pipo" means "beanie" in Finnish, by the way, hehheh.

  • Battery life? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by gstoddart ( 321705 ) on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @01:27PM (#48028609) Homepage

    All are running Intel chips and full Windows

    A full windows install with Intel chips isn't exactly tuned for mobile battery performance.

    So will these things have an exceedingly short battery life?

    And I'm betting they will have so little memory as to be unusable -- because Windows with anything less than 4G is a complete dog in my experience.

    I predict a terrible product on this one.

    • Re:Battery life? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 30, 2014 @01:55PM (#48028865)

      I've got the Asus transformerbook T100. It's a tablet that runs full fat windows 8.1 No fans. Charges USB. I get 8-10 hours of use out of it between charges. (Comes with a detachable keyboard/trackpad which is nice. Also has HDMI out)

      It's not as nice as, say, an ipad but it's a full windows machine and it costs half what an ipad does. Since Intel introduced the baytrail Atom they really have been able to make machines that operate in a no-bullshit tablet power enevlope.

    • 4GB of ram isn't a long shot anymore but Windows 8 runs fine on much less than that. Netbooks have the OS using only 480MB. The cold boot time was 22 seconds which is very reasonable. With version 8.1 it is suppose to be even less memory hungry with a similar boot time.

    • If there is a decent navigation app available then they will make a dandy automotive platform, at a hundred bucks. That reminds me, I need to leave a bug report about Viago being a piece of shit.

  • I bought a very nice 32GB, 10" HP Touchpad for $150 three years ago. It runs the latest Android and is my daily driver, does everything I want - email, browsing, Netflix, good battery, etc. Bluetooth keyboard if you want it.

  • I'll buy (may swtich to Linux) if it has a micro HDMI output so I can dock the thing at a real monitor (1960*1200 min). I've been looking around to tablets as desktop replacements and found relatively few x86 with HDMI out.

  • by sootman ( 158191 )

    "HP... wants to offer a range of products to meet different needs..."

    Understatement of the century. I think HP has more SKUs than customers.

    • yeah four years ago had client who was miffed I didn't know which disk he should order for his HP3000 (that's right runs MPE operating system) off the top of my head.

      Then I pulled up 1,200 HP disk SKUs and said, you know they sell just a few different disks.

  • Last time they had a $99 tablet they sold like mad. [google.com] This should work out well. :D

  • Microsoft has a long history of over-promising, and under-delivering.

    This has been going on for decades: "don't buy our competitor's product! We are just about to release something that completely blows it out of the water!" Then Microsoft starts pushing back the delivery date, changing prices, dropping features, and so on.

    • by Nyder ( 754090 )

      Microsoft has a long history of over-promising, and under-delivering.

      This has been going on for decades: "don't buy our competitor's product! We are just about to release something that completely blows it out of the water!" Then Microsoft starts pushing back the delivery date, changing prices, dropping features, and so on.

      But this is HP...

  • Putting a 7 on a Windows product is now the key to a successful marketing campaign. I suspect this will be a huge success.
  • I'm so glad the netbook concept is dead. Who wants a cheap Windows laptop anyways? (smirk) I suppose these neo-netbooks (nee Stream) will run also-Windows 8.1, probably with a non-settable background image or some other lame-ass mildly crippled feature...
  • That would be a dream!


    Or maybe not.

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