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Dell Partners With MakerBot To Resell 3D Printers and Scanners

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  • But ... (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    But ... do they come with the schematics to produce replacement parts for your now overpriced and under supported Dell 3D printer?

  • Product Lineup (Score:5, Informative)

    by NFN_NLN (633283) on Monday January 27, 2014 @07:45PM (#46087089)

    Here is the product lineup Dell plans to sell:

    MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer – 100-micron layer resolution and a 410-cubic-inch build volume priced at $2,199.
    MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer – features experimental dual extrusion optimized for printing with MakerBot ABS Filament, available for $2,799.
    MakerBot Replicator Mini Compact 3D Printer – fast and easy one-touch 3D printing will be available in the spring at an anticipated price of $1,375.
    MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printer – provides a large build volume and fast print times to accelerate rapid prototyping and model making, available for pre-order at $2,899.
    MakerBot Replicator Z18 3D Printer – massive build volume and the best price to performance ratio in its category, available in the spring of 2014 for $6,499.
    MakerBot Digitizer Desktop 3D Scanner – optimized for use MakerBot Replicator Desktop 3D Printers and MakerBot Thingiverse, available at the price of $949.

    So it looks like $1,375 is the base price.

  • I'm working on some hinge designs for something for a renaissance faire, so it would be nice if the files Makerbot uses could be handed to a metal sintering company to make the identical object... but made from Iconel.

    I wonder how this will turn out. Dell resells a lot of products, so it does make sense, as it does keep them as a one stop shop for businesses.

    I'm probably sure (please correct if I am wrong) there are better printers for the money, but Makerbot seems to have their act together the best for g

    • by necro81 (917438)

      be nice if the files Makerbot uses could be handed to a metal sintering company

      I'm not sure what you mean by this. If you are referring to the *.stl file representing the part geometry (before slicing, rastering, and toolpath generation), then you need look no further. stl files are the lingua franca of 3D printing; any company that accepts files for printing will take this. You may have to search around for a company that does inconel (not really keeping with the renaissance period, eh?), but there ar

  • I can understand their desire to get I to this business - but as it stands now, this is sort of a "specialized" market and customer. It's not just like an IT department is going to throw one in on an order because "their vendor" (Dell) sells them.

    Much more likely to be purchased by an artistic, engineering, manufacturing-type of group - under greater control and scrutiny than "I need a [standard] PC" like a lot of boilerplate Dell IT purchases.

    Maybe these consumers would go with Makerbot, maybe not - bu

  • by MobyDisk (75490) on Monday January 27, 2014 @08:07PM (#46087259) Homepage

    In true Dell tradition, it will come with some additional features not present in the regular Makerbot Replicators:

    * The custom Dell firmware will be the same as the regular Makerbot firmware, but will come with additional Dell branded support features that make your printer go 1/2 the speed. You can however, uninstall these tools.

    * It will come with free red filament, a 30-day free trial blue filament, a "light" green filament.
    The red filament will not be compatible with your new 3D printer. The blue filament will automatically bill your credit card after 30 days even if you have not used it. The "light" green filament is half the diameter of the "full" green filament and will cause your prints to break. You can optionally upgrade this to the "full" green filament for half price.

  • by rmdingler (1955220) on Monday January 27, 2014 @08:26PM (#46087385)
    When you're number three in the PC market, behind acquisition-minded HP and Lenovo, it's not as if you can rest on your laurels.

    As a plus for me and mine personally, I welcome the spread of 3D printers to bring the cost of my future purchase way, way down.

  • Having/using/bangingMyHeadAgainstAWallRepeatedlyBecauseOf/beingMightilyDissapointedBy a makerbot 2x at work, I hope Dell are ready for the tech support nightmare that is going to be involved in this endeavor.

    Don't ask me why, but we are still thinking of purchasing a Z18 when they come out. Seems like it is worth a go before we go buying a $140,000 Stratasys Fortus and associated infrastructure to support one.

    Also, Bre Pettis is a cock.

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      Having/using/bangingMyHeadAgainstAWallRepeatedlyBecauseOf/beingMightilyDissapointedBy a makerbot 2x at work, I hope Dell are ready for the tech support nightmare that is going to be involved in this endeavor.

      That, I think, is actually a major problem. 3D printers are high-maintenance things and half the time, things don't go right. Of course, you only find out hours later after it's halfway done that for some reason the whole mass shifted and what you got is now crooked.

      Especially since it appears that they

      • by MobyDisk (75490)

        FTFY:

        That, I think, is actually a major problem. Low-priced amateur 3D printers are high-maintenance things and half the time, things don't go right.

        This really is a solved problem, just not in the low-cost market.

        I have a Makerbot Replicator at home, which is unreliable. My employer has a Stratasys. It requires only yearly maintenance, and it never fails a print. When I described my Makerbot woes to the mechanical engineers here at work, they were all surprised. They just thought of the devices as being reliable like office printers. Things like prints not sticking, some shapes not being printable, things coming out the wrong size, or manuall

        • by yurtinus (1590157)
          While I agree with the gist of this thread - I do think it's exciting to see some mainstream interest (and mainstream money) being put into consumer-grade 3d printers. Dell might not be the ideal company for it, but I still consider it another step toward having commodity 3d printers whose capabilities we can take for granted (just like our CD burners or laser printers).
  • by kamapuaa (555446) on Monday January 27, 2014 @10:11PM (#46087877) Homepage

    This will really help companies that need to make plastic cups and little toys - and in a hurry!

  • Dell also made the news by buying out the whole capacity of some polish startup: http://techcrunch.com/2014/01/... [techcrunch.com]

  • Anyone who thinks partnering with Dell is a good idea is clueless and stuck in the 90's. These days if your product is sold by Dell, it's automatically labeled overpriced and under performing junk that will break very quickly. You know, like all Dell printers, monitors, PCs, and laptops, and basically everything else they sell. Even the Dell brand laptop bags fall apart.
    • Too late, Makerbot products were already labelled as over-priced and under-performing in the 3D printing community (among anyone who knows anything about the many competing products like Ultimaker, Lulzbot, and any of the other far less expensive 3d scanners out there). It sounds like a match made in heaven to me.

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..." -- Isaac Asimov

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