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CyanogenMod Powered Oppo N1 Will Be Released In December

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  • 3G / no microSD (Score:4, Insightful)

    by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Saturday November 09, 2013 @10:43AM (#45376931) Homepage Journal

    I just happen to be researching my next device in another tab - I use a Verizon MVNO - the Galaxy S4 looks like the contender if I can find an unlocked CDMA version of it. I've already accepted the need for a bluetooth mini keyboard and an external battery pack to replace my Droid 3.

    Then this came up so I followed links to links to specs [muktware.com]. "Ah, I could support CyanogenMod. I don't really need 4G for anything. I'm always in it for the underdog".

    But, "oh, no microSD slot."

    If anybody has links for how to use an unlocked S4 on Verizon prepaid, much appreciated.

    • by tepples (727027) <tepples@nOSpAM.gmail.com> on Saturday November 09, 2013 @11:20AM (#45377077) Homepage Journal

      But, "oh, no microSD slot."

      Microsoft makes $2 billion per year from patent royalties on Android devices [slashdot.org] and is assumed to spend the money on keeping its Windows Phone division afloat. Makers of devices without a microSD slot don't have to pay VFAT or exFAT royalties to Microsoft.

      • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        And the fact that I'd love to pay a few pennies for that royalty to make my life easier may surprise you. It might also surprise you that I don't give a shit if someone has to pay Microsoft a royalty, I want what I want and don't share your opinion.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          And the fact that I'd love to pay a few pennies for that royalty to make my life easier may surprise you. It might also surprise you that I don't give a shit if someone has to pay Microsoft a royalty, I want what I want and don't share your opinion.

          So go buy an Android phone from Sony, or one of the others who offer exactky what you want. That, after all, is the beauty of Android. Multiple manufacturers offering a wide variety of phones, so there's a compatible device the works for almost everyone. There's

      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        What does an SD card slot have to do with VFAT and exFAT patents. Couldn't they just format the card with EXT4, and ignore the patents. Sure you couldn't read the SD card on your windows machine, but I'm sure most people would still find the slot useful.
        • by tepples (727027)

          Sure you couldn't read the SD card on your windows machine

          Exactly. People would complain that they can't eject the card, put it in a PC running stock Windows, load videos onto it, and put it back in the phone. Or they'd put it in a PC running stock Windows, not know what "format" means, and raise a stink when all their data disappears.

          • Every freaking Windows peripheral requires a driver install - people are conditioned. If the Android device comes with a driver disk that happens to implement ext4 or ZFS or whatever on Windows, nobody will know the difference.

            $2B/yr could write a lovely ext driver for Windows.

            • by CastrTroy (595695)
              Or they could just implement things differently. When plugging your phone in, it presents itself as a network card (one that Windows already has a driver for), at the other end of the fake network is an FTP server. Plug in the phone, Computer thinks it's added a new network, On the screen of the phone, display the address they need to visit in Explorer (or anything else with FTP capabilities) to access the server. There you go, easy access to your phone's file system, without requiring people to implement
      • Makers of devices without a microSD slot don't have to pay VFAT or exFAT royalties to Microsoft.

        Aside from the fact that a software patent is different from a hardware patent, why not just offer an alternative? For nexus phones at least, I believe it's because Google wants you to stream everything (from them).

        • Aside from the fact that a software patent is different from a hardware patent, why not just offer an alternative?

          Because stock Windows XP supports no alternative. Windows couldn't write to UDF until Windows Vista, and Windows XP still has five months of official support left. And for cards larger than 32 GB, I'm under the impression that the SD standard requires that devices support exFAT.

          I believe it's because Google wants you to stream everything (from them).

          At a limit of 5 GB per month on a typical cellular broadband plan, that can get very cost-prohibitive very quickly. The buses in my city do not provide Wi-Fi.

        • by tlhIngan (30335)

          Makers of devices without a microSD slot don't have to pay VFAT or exFAT royalties to Microsoft.

          Aside from the fact that a software patent is different from a hardware patent, why not just offer an alternative? For nexus phones at least, I believe it's because Google wants you to stream everything (from them).

          That's one reason. Another one is to avoid patents.

          Google does its best to avoid patents - the famous "rounded corners" patent includes a grid of icons with a static tray at the bottom. Android's close

          • Yes, but they don't have to use FAT at all. They could use ext* or something. People wouldn't be able to plug the card directly into their windows computers, but without an SD card at all you get the same effect. Write to the storage card by using MTP through the phone.
      • by evilviper (135110)

        Microsoft makes $2 billion per year from patent royalties on Android devices

        And it's BS to claim it's all (or mostly) from patents on FAT32. Microsoft has LOTS of patents.

        Makers of devices without a microSD slot don't have to pay VFAT or exFAT royalties to Microsoft.

        Really? Than how does your Android device show up as a USB mass storage device when connected to your Windows computer?

        • Than how does your Android device show up as a USB mass storage device when connected to your Windows computer?

          An Android 4.x device doesn't show up as mass storage. Instead, it shows up as an MTP responder [wikipedia.org], which speaks a file level protocol more analogous to SMB or FTP. (It's like the difference between a SAN and a NAS.) In theory, a device could format an SD card using Ext* or UDF and make it available through MTP. But in practice, if a device has a microSD slot, the user will expect to be able to eject the card and stick it in cameras that only speak FAT32 or exFAT or in Windows PCs that only speak FAT32, exFAT,

    • by thrift24 (683443)
      What do you even want a microsd slot for? The device will still have storage, most likely much faster than an sdcard. You can simply plug your android device into a computer and use this storage as a USB drive AND your phone can use the storage at the same time. More computers have USB ports than have SD slots .. Then you've probably got to use the micro SD to SD converter card... And to get to the sdcard you almost always have to remove the cover of the phone. What benefit does an sdcard provide?
      • What do you even want a microsd slot for?

        More space than the manufacturers give you.

        The device will still have storage, most likely much faster than an sdcard.

        They won't have 32-64 Gigabytes of storage (which I need for music etc), and if they did they would charge you out the ass for it. 32 and 64 GB SD cards aren't exactly cheap, but at least once you've bought one you can use it in all future phones you buy. Also, it's not any slower than internal storage. In fact the 16GB of storage in my xperia T is literally another embedded SD card.

        You can simply plug your android device into a computer and use this storage as a USB drive AND your phone can use the storage at the same time.

        Yes this is how it works with SD cards too. You obviously have never tried this, a

      • by mythosaz (572040)

        The vocal minority wants to have big SD card full of music.

        Nobody else has cared in a long time now that phone capacity is big enough to store thousands of photos and songs all by itself.

  • Will it have the Play store and all the Google Apps?

    I am guessing no because Google once send a C&D to Cyanogen Mod.

    http://lifehacker.com/5367693/google-sends-cease-and-desist-to-cyanogenmod-android-hacker [lifehacker.com]

    http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/10/googles-iron-grip-on-android-controlling-open-source-by-any-means-necessary/ [arstechnica.com]

    • by citizenr (871508)

      It will, CM is castrating new roms left and right to please Google. No root, no save to SDcard, and so on.

    • by karnal (22275)

      This is extremely similar to wanting to play MP3s on a linux box. The various distributors of linux cannot include this capability in the distribution, but it can be installed somewhat easily. Same with Cyanogenmod; after installing the rom you install the google apps bundle for that android version - and wham, google play (and all the other goodies.)

      This might be something to where the handset manufacturer would pay (and charge the customer?) to distribute it on the phone the day of purchase. In additio

    • by foma84 (2079302)
      Since nobody else pointed this out: there are also other apps and markets similar to Play Store, just "unofficial", with all the benefits and quirks that come along. Just sayin'.
  • Cyanogenmod started removing features as soon as they sold out. One of them was root.

    • Cyanogenmod started removing features as soon as they sold out. One of them was root.

      I've seen this posted a lot, but I haven't seen it. I download and install the latest nightly version every morning after I wake up. My phone still has root and I haven't seen any mention of removing it in any of the change logs.

  • How unfortunate that this outfit has the same name as the Oppo that makes the BDP line of pioneering universal disc/media players. (That's the guys at oppodigital.com.) Lots of unnecessary confusion will ensue, fostered in part by the telecom Oppo's own inclusion of a BDP review in the Press tab at the site linked to here.

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