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Android Displays Google Hardware

Programming a Wearable Android Device 53

Posted by Soulskill
from the get-geordi's-advice dept.
CowboyRobot writes "Dr. Dobb's reviews an alternative to Google Glass and goes through the steps of coding your own Android-based Heads-Up Display. 'By tucking their 428x240 pixel WQVGA heads-up display in the lower right corner of ski goggles, Recon has effectively created an unobtrusive HUD with a decent 600 MHz ARM Cortex A8 processor running Android 2.3.3 (Eclair). Network connections can be made via a Bluetooth-paired Android smartphone.'"
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Programming a Wearable Android Device

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  • by T.E.D. (34228) on Tuesday September 18, 2012 @01:22PM (#41377203)
    Umm...unobtrusive if you are skiing, perhaps. If you are walking around town in the middle of September, not so much.
  • Eclair was Android 2.1. I can definitely see why soulskull was scared about dice imposing standards on the editors. Any other media outlet would have long since fired these flunkies.

  • by Picass0 (147474) on Tuesday September 18, 2012 @01:27PM (#41377281) Homepage Journal

    A heads up display allows you to look straight ahead without adjusting your focal point or moving your eye. This doesn't look as though the image is projected onto the surface of the googles. the user must make an effort to view information, it is not overlayed with the normal field of view. It's just a mini-display tucked into the corner of diving googles.

    • A HUD is literally a Heads Up Display, which this certainly is. Projected overlay within normal field of view is an implementation of HUD, but not its defining characteristic. In this type of application, both implementations are attached to the head rendering the inferred head position of HUD a bit moot.
    • "It's just a mini-display tucked into the corner of diving googles."

      You need to learn to ski better.

  • Skiing is already kind of dangerous, and has lots of opportunities to run into things and people.

    I'm not sure embedding a display that can distract you is necessarily a great idea...

    A pure HUD overlay over the whole view that was primarily about warning you of collisions might be useful though. Especially indicators of things to the side just out of your FOV, or terrain radar warning you of ripples in the terrain you could not see because of flat light or snow.

    • Driving is dangerous too, yet every car comes with a vast array of readouts and inputs.
      • Driving is dangerous too, yet every car comes with a vast array of readouts and inputs.

        Not as dangerous: the view ahead of you is clear, the other displays are out of the way and (most importantly) not impeding peripheral vision.

        I would also argue that most people skiing have much less control ability than they do in a car to react to sudden peril. Hitting brakes or steering is very easy; braking/turning sharply on uneven terrain is difficult on skis or a snowboard.

    • by chrismcb (983081)

      I'm not sure embedding a display that can distract you is necessarily a great idea...

      It is just as distracting as the edge of your goggle frame, your hand as it moves into view, the hot skier chick who skied by.
      How distracting is your speedometer when you are driving? That is about how distracting the Recon device is

    • by jdbuz (962721)
      Branded for Oakley: Oakley Omni-vision (Omnies for short); Apple? Apple Eyes (may end up patenting vision). Ray-Ban? Ray-Scans. Serengeti? CanzaSeeyas. Ok, your game is is harder than I thought...
  • The article and summary both get this wrong. Also, most people would not consider ski goggles unobtrusive.

  • I'm a bike rider (Motor, not foot powered) and I can think of many uses this would be handy for when on a cruise around the country side. The standard email/speed/weather apps would be handy. But how about adding a rear, wide-angle camera view that I could glimpse at without turning my head around. That would be pretty useful.

Little known fact about Middle Earth: The Hobbits had a very sophisticated computer network! It was a Tolkien Ring...

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