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Plastic Logic Shows Off a Color ePaper Screen 50

Posted by Soulskill
from the technology-that-should-totally-be-here-by-now dept.
Nate the greatest writes "I'm sure you've heard about the color E-ink screen which was rumored to be used on the next Kindle. As of today, E-ink no longer has that market niche to themselves. Plastic Logic held a press conference in Russia this morning where they unveiled a new color screen that uses their plastic-based screen tech. The resolution is low (75ppi), but if the video is any sign, then this might be a better screen than the 9.7" Triton color E-ink screen used on the Jetbook Color. And that's not all Plastic Logic showed off this morning; they also developed a frontlight for their screen, and they can play video at 12 frames per second. But best of all, they cut one of their screens in half just to show that it could still work."
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Plastic Logic Shows Off a Color ePaper Screen

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  • Parenting (Score:5, Funny)

    by Dan East (318230) on Monday May 14, 2012 @05:58PM (#39999877) Homepage Journal

    Ahhh, this will make parenting a little easier.
    Kid 1: "It's my turn!!"
    Kid 2: "I need to check my FB!"
    Kid 1: "You used the tablet all day yesterday!"
    Kid 2: "DID NOT!"
    Me: "Here, give me that blasted thing."
    Whips out tin snips.
    "Half for you, and half for you."

  • by EvilStein (414640) <spam@@@pbp...net> on Monday May 14, 2012 @06:16PM (#40000071) Homepage

    A pretty weak "article" that has 3 links to some blog and one to laptop mag, and the still vaporware product is from a company the blogger pretty much wrote off 2 years ago.

    *This* is what makes it to the front page now? Wow..

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      If you want only articles about existing products - go visit a catalogue or review site.

      If you want to learn about interesting technology and things people are experimenting with, then stay here, but don't whine about everything not yet at production stage being "vaporware"

      • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

        by EvilStein (414640)

        Excuse me, but who was whining? I certainly wasn't.

        If I want to learn about interesting technology, I'll go to reddit or hacker news. It certainly isn't here anymore, sorry. The glory days of Slashdot are long gone and this place is looking like Digg more and more every day.

        But thanks for your completely irrelevant comment anyway.

    • Never has a sig been so apt.

  • 75ppi or 175? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    The Russian PR guy says 175ppi in at least one of the videos.

  • If you can produce something at 75 ppi that's intended to be held at standard reading distance, then you're just fine - you're relatively close to computer monitor spacing anyways and you're really not that far off from the standard printing dimensions of a paperback book.

    If you're expecting someone to hold it up to their eyeballs for cheap laser surgery [wikipedia.org] (or hell, a pattern of eyeball abuse that'll cause them to need laser surgery eventually), then maybe you want more pixels. Not that it'll really help you,

    • by mark-t (151149)

      1/75 of an inch held at 12 inches from the face takes up 3.1 arc minutes of viewing area. The human eye's resolution is about 16 arcseconds - over an order of magnitude better. Most people with good vision would almost certainly notice a level of blockiness and poor quality.

      Apple's retina display is the first one I've seen that I don't notice individual pixels on unless I'm paying attention for them.

      • by Moryath (553296)

        Ever held a paperback book that close to your face to read it? Notice the type looking a little bit "blocky"? Notice how you can see the flaws in the printing process?

        No different. 75 ppi is just fine for an e-reader. And no respectable optometrist EVER recommends holding the book at that distance. Hold it at standard reading distance instead (say, 24 inches or higher) and run that calculation.

        • by dgatwood (11270)

          And no respectable optometrist EVER recommends holding the book at that distance. Hold it at standard reading distance instead (say, 24 inches or higher) and run that calculation.

          I measured 24 inches from my eyes, and in order to do so, I had to old the measuring tape up with my fingertips, with my arms fully extended. No optometrist in his right mind would recommend such a large reading distance. Maybe for TV viewing, but not reading.

          Typical reading distance is 14-16 inches. So although 12 inches might

          • by dgatwood (11270)

            Err... had to hold the measuring tape....

            And this, folks, is why over-reliance on automatic spell checking is harmful. *sigh*

            • by Auroch (1403671)

              Err... had to hold the measuring tape....

              And this, folks, is why over-reliance on automatic spell checking is harmful. *sigh*

              Hey, stop picking on the OP for a spelling mistake - he made a perfectly cromulent point. Besides, if you keep going all grammar/spelling nazi on him, you'll him some sort disassociative disorder and he'll never be a productive member of society.

        • 75 ppi is just fine for an e-reader.

          No it isn't. :) It's in the same ballpark than a 15" 1024x768, pixel size being around 0.3 mm. You would have to double the pixel density for it to be good for an e-reader.

        • 75dpi was the resolution of most 1980s dot matrix printers.

          It was awful. The only way you could get relatively decent quality print out of them was to use an over-printing capability that appeared mid way through that decade that effectively trebled the resolution vertically, and a "condensed" mode that increased it by about 80% horizontally. That would give you something that meant that Times Roman at 15pt or better was just about decent, and at 12pt was just about readable. Anything smaller, and it was

    • by MBCook (132727)

      According to Wikipedia, the current eInk Kindles are all about 68 [wikipedia.org] ppi. So this screen would be as good (if not better) than the current Kindles in that department.

      Unfortunately, this screen looks like it lacks color saturation, which seems to be a common trait among all color eInk displays. It's a big improvement over previous displays, but I still wouldn't put it in a product yet. People would immediately put it next to LCD displays, and compared to the display on a $60 "might as well sell it at the drugs

      • by alphamax (1176593)

        According to Wikipedia, the current eInk Kindles are all about 68 [wikipedia.org] ppi. So this screen would be as good (if not better) than the current Kindles in that department.

        Unfortunately, this screen looks like it lacks color saturation, which seems to be a common trait among all color eInk displays. It's a big improvement over previous displays, but I still wouldn't put it in a product yet. People would immediately put it next to LCD displays, and compared to the display on a $60 "might as well sell it at the drugstore" tablet, it would look bad.

        If you follow your own link, you will see that according to Wikipedia, current eInk Kindles are about 67 ppcm, which is around 169 ppi. So this screen isn't half as good as the current Kindles in that department.

    • If they can get the contrast closer to actual paper on b&w I'll be happy.

  • by hack slash (1064002) on Tuesday May 15, 2012 @02:36AM (#40002673)
    I'd love some colour e-ink displays that are 3ft by 4ft, perfect for posters on your walls that only use power when you want to change the picture - and they'd literally be just the display, the device that 'uploads' the new picture would contain most of (all?) the necessary driver circuitry.
  • If they can make them larger, with more color saturation and cut-it-and-it-still-works-fine properties, they'll be the perfect thing to make dynamic marquees for arcade cabinets.

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