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Vizio Plans To Undercut The Market For All-In-One PCs 268

Posted by timothy
from the price-wars-are-fun-for-the-observers dept.
TV maker Vizio is famous for undercutting competitors' prices on LCD TVs; now, the company has released word that it will introduce a new line of budget computers, and next week will be showing them off at CES. Bloomberg reports that the company won't yet disclose actual prices (the kind with numbers), but says instead only that they will be at a "price that just doesn’t seem possible." As the article mentions, the all-in-one desktop machines shown look a lot like Apple products; BetaNews has pictures, and ominously mentions Apple's tendency to sue over similar-looking products.
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Vizio Plans To Undercut The Market For All-In-One PCs

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  • by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:25PM (#38633270)
    Aside from rounded rectangles, is there anything else that looks similar to an Apple product in the picture? Has Apple been marketing truncated-pyramid shaped computers lately?
    • by Osgeld (1900440)

      the color silver

      • Hackintosh! (tm) ;-)

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:46PM (#38633376)

      There is that minimal keyboard that looks like it would be hell to type on if you have any sort of speed. That's very Apple.

    • by bonch (38532) * on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:47PM (#38633380)

      If you really think that the only thing that makes it similar-looking to Apple products is "rounded rectangles," then you're intentionally being obtuse for whatever reason. There comes a point where it's obvious that other companies are liberally borrowing from Jonathan Ive's design shop at Apple.

      Vizio's PC concept looks like this [tumblr.com]. The keyboard looks just like Apple's flat keyboard [imgur.com] introduced a few years ago, the trackpad is a clone of the Apple Trackpad [imgur.com], and though it's less of a copy than the others, the screen is certainly reminiscent of an iMac, especially taken as a whole with the rest of the components.

      I'm not surprised at all that, with all the design work Apple puts into its products, it is going to try to protect that work from knockoffs. Not only is this taking advantage of design work done at Apple, but if the products turn out to be low-quality or problematic, their resemblance to existing Apple products ends up damaging Apple's brand as well. I realize Slashdot comments tend to have an Apple slant (to put it mildly), but come on, this is completely obvious "inspiration" from Apple.

      I think what really goes on here is that some people just don't want to give Apple credit for anything, and they hate when people do credit them, so when comparisons between designs are pointed out, it pisses them off and they make snarky remarks about "rounded rectangles."

      • by viperidaenz (2515578) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @09:13PM (#38633536)
        You mean that TV shaped thing in the picture from the company thats been making TVs since 2002?
        • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 08, 2012 @09:39PM (#38633720)

          uh, yeah. It is a well known FACT that TV is just an acronym for AppleTV. Also, surprised no one has mentioned this. Ever notice how the layout on most keyboards is the same as the layout on Apple Keyboards? Rip. Off. It is an ever more well known FACT that QWERTY is Martian for Apple. There are a billion ways to design a keyboard but they all come out rectangular just like Apple. Key sizes pretty much the same as Apple. Even the SAME LANGUAGE AS APPLE!!!!!! They all use the "keystroke" which is the term that high-energy physicists at the LHC have used for centuries to describe touching the brilliance that is Apple products. Most damning is this Vizio product is made from Aluminum. How many things in your house are made from Aluminum. One thing? Two? Most tech products not made by Apple are made from Lead and use molten lava for electrical wires.

          It's gotten so bad even general appliance makers are ripping off Apple. Went in my kitchen and saw that my refrigerator was not only rectangular but also made from brushed stainless (like the iPod) and used the English language!!!! And the sink was made from the same exotic Apple exclusive materials as well. And obviously Kohler ripped off Apple's trademarked ease-of-use. All I do is lift the handle and it magically knows what temperature I want my water. Probably ripped of iOS for the sinksoftware as well. Where are the GPL whiners to defend Apple? Nowhere, that's where. And my sink also, not my favorite part honestly, has the same "walled-garden" type block as iOS. Try as hard as I can, but I still can't get the thing to give me soda or beer when I want it. That's really all Android based sinks have going for them. But in the end it's OK because I need Apple, er, Kohler to protect me from evil soda and beer. Don't want to cross the streams. (Copyright Apple).

      • by AngryDeuce (2205124) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @09:22PM (#38633594)

        My question is, at what point does a particular design go from being something proprietary to something obvious for it's function? For instance, when does "rounded rectangles" go from being a style feature to a "of course the corners are rounded, what else are they going to do with them, make them pointed?" When does a particular size go from a "design style" to "duh, of course it's going to be about the same size, it is intended for the same function"?

        Personally, I have no problem with design being proprietary, but when it requires competitors to actually produce inferior products and impede on their functionality to avoid just looking too much like another product that it is directly competing with, it doesn't seem right to me. Of course tablets are all going to be about the same size, people have about the same size hands, more or less. Every chiclet style keyboard looks basically the same, every trackpad is going to look basically the same, every tablet is going to look basically the same, every smartphone is going to look basically the same. A manufacturer shouldn't be forced to put physical buttons on a touchscreen device just because Apple's touchscreen devices don't have any, or point the corners of their tablet just because Apple's are rounded, or not bevel the edges (that would just be uncomfortable to hold for anyone, I mean, come on), or any of the other silly things that I've heard come out of these patent lawsuits...

        • OMG, thank you!!!! I have been thinking the same thing as all of these companies started to sue each other over whatever they can think of (OK, well Apple is leading the pack on that one)

          I believe they are stifling competition because no one is allowed to have products that look anything remotely resembling Apple's. Now I do agree they are sexy designs(as always), but at what point can you sue over such things.

          My TV looks like just about every other TV, but you don't see TV companies suing each other. (o

        • by Nemyst (1383049) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @11:06PM (#38634214) Homepage

          Corners should have spikes on them... You know, just so you can run them through particularly annoying fanboys.

        • My question is, at what point does a particular design go from being something proprietary to something obvious for it's function?

          The point at which your lawyers can't convince a judge any longer, of course.

      • You have to drink an awful lot of that KoolAid to think that looks like an Apple product, aside from it being 'glitzy and shiny'.

      • Finally, they've perfected the giant iPad with a keyboard, and a bunch of accessories, without any wires whatsoever (not even for electricity).

      • by artor3 (1344997)

        Please tell me how you would design a trackpad that isn't a smooth, flat, rectangular surface.

        • by jo_ham (604554)

          Well, Logitech did it. Their trackpad has curving sections at the top - in fact, I don't think it has a straight edge on it, other than where the touch surface itself meets the casing.

      • by anonymov (1768712)

        How is this [blogcdn.com] is just like this [imgur.com] except for "it's a keyboard and it's thin"?

    • Samsung SwipeIt (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Samsung also introduced the SwipeIt [akumar.me] a competitor to Apple AirPlay and probably the best name for a Samsung product ever.

  • Good for them. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Nyder (754090) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:25PM (#38633272) Journal

    Cheap computers are a good thing for the poor people. computers might suck, but at least it will allow some people to get online.

    Not that you can't find a ton on craigslist or anything.

    • Re:Good for them. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Osgeld (1900440) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:45PM (#38633360)

      a local thrift store had a compaq pentium I machine that booted up to a 98 bluescreen and wanted 100$, and some dumb shit bought it. Meanwhile across town at the habitat for humanity reuse center (and this like 5 min away, ... small town) they were selling 2ghz p4 pizza boxes for 5 bucks each, and they sat there for months.

      poor people for some reason often have a skewed vision of a good buy, that 100$ computer HAD to be good, and those 5$ computers were useless shit, point being its often better to direct them away from ripoff list cause they will plop down 600 bucks for that mac G4 that some douche thinks is still the sweetest thing on the planet

      • Re:Good for them. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Baron_Yam (643147) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @09:15PM (#38633548)

        While some people just can't catch a break, or have suffered from lack of opportunity... people who are poor long term often have related poor decision making skills. Whether that's genetic or due to poor parents teaching them the wrong things, I'll leave to the social scientists.

        You'll see a surprising number of fairly wealthy people play the lottery - one ticket here and there. You'll see an equally surprising number of poor people play the lottery, dozens of tickets at a time. You'll also see them maxing out credit cards and going to paycheque cashing stores, seemingly without realizing that if they'd just hold off for ONE paycheque, they'd have 10-20% more money to spend. I know a guy with a bottom-end job who is very modest in his purchases, and keeps socking most of his money away. 20 years later, he's a freakin' LANDLORD to some of his former coworkers, and he built it all on a minimum wage job. It can be done.

        Seeing a poor person get taking isn't surprising, but when they're fleecing themselves and the person profiting *isn't* trying to take advantage of them, what do you do? Give up on the adults and hope for the best for the kids.

        I say this as someone whose extended family has both middle and lower income families in it.

        • Re:Good for them. (Score:5, Informative)

          by hedwards (940851) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @09:27PM (#38633644)

          I find that hard to believe an economic system like that is called communism. In order for a capitalist society to exist, at least in the type that the US is, you have winners and you have losers. Most of the winners had quite a bit to start with and most of the losers didn't have much to start with.

          This whole notion of upward mobility hasn't been true in at least 40 years. Sure you get some people that manage it, but the money that would have gone to making that work out is now being siphoned directly to the richest Americans.

          • Re:Good for them. (Score:5, Insightful)

            by Solandri (704621) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @10:30PM (#38633942)

            In order for a capitalist society to exist, at least in the type that the US is, you have winners and you have losers.

            This is a fundamental misunderstanding of capitalism. Economics is not a zero-sum game. In a capitalist society, you have big winners and you have small winners. Every transaction is made because both participants feel it is advantageous for them to make it. If either party feels a transaction will make them a "loser", they simply will not make the transaction. Failing to be a big winner is not losing.

            If you're consistently generating losers, that points to a problem either in your implementation of capitalism (e.g. overly broad patents prevent competition from introducing and lowering prices for flat, rectangular computing devices), or in the people (lack of education/information, or irrational decision making).

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by Anonymous Coward

              Yes, the people and implementations are flawed, not the theory. The theory is beautiful and perfect. Why can't reality be more like the theory?

              Why don't we take capitalism to its fullest extent and just give one guy all the money. The only way that you get the game to reset is a 100% estate tax. Otherwise oligarchy/fascism/plutocracy is inevitable.

              "Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as an exploited proletariat but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires."

            • Re:Good for them. (Score:4, Insightful)

              by timeOday (582209) on Monday January 09, 2012 @12:23AM (#38634656)
              Economics is not zero-sum. Neither is it infinite-sum. If it were, there would be no competition. In reality, a company that is doing fairly well can be driven out of business by another company that is just a few percentage-points more efficient (winner-takes-all).

              The principle of voluntary transactions is much less significant than you make it out to be. Freedom is no more valuable than the best option made available to you. Only children and fools are placated by making their "own decision" from a range of options that are all bad, and all designed by the other party to benefit themselves.

              Consistently generating losers is the natural outcome of unregulated markets - that is, monopoly.

            • Re:Good for them. (Score:4, Informative)

              by unimacs (597299) on Monday January 09, 2012 @01:31AM (#38634954)

              In order for a capitalist society to exist, at least in the type that the US is, you have winners and you have losers.

              This is a fundamental misunderstanding of capitalism. Economics is not a zero-sum game. In a capitalist society, you have big winners and you have small winners. Every transaction is made because both participants feel it is advantageous for them to make it. If either party feels a transaction will make them a "loser", they simply will not make the transaction. Failing to be a big winner is not losing. If you're consistently generating losers, that points to a problem either in your implementation of capitalism (e.g. overly broad patents prevent competition from introducing and lowering prices for flat, rectangular computing devices), or in the people (lack of education/information, or irrational decision making).

              For a transaction to occur both parties have to have something that the other wants. It could be an object of some sort, a service, or a form of currency. If you have little (you're poor), you are at an inherent disadvantage. You can certainly still provide some sort of service, but if there are millions of other people as poor or poorer than you, they may be willing to exchange their services for less.

              Further complicating the problem, - what if machines are introduced that can perform the service for even cheaper? It doesn't take machines to wreak havoc on the system though. What if the potential buyers of said service collude, and agree that none of them will pay any more than a paltry sum?

              The more you have, the more you can control the nature of the transactions and the exchange rate. The less you have, the more you are at the whims of those that do. This is playing out every day. It has nothing to do with patents or irrational decision making.

              Playing a simple game of Monopoly bears this out fairly quickly. It's not hard to grasp.

              It's been a while, but 10 or 15 years ago, economists were freaking out over the tight labor market. It was driving up costs and was bound to lead to trouble. You know what? There were still lots of people unemployed. Capitalism depends on having a supply of employed people, - i.e. losers.

            • by drsmithy (35869)

              Every transaction is made because both participants feel it is advantageous for them to make it. If either party feels a transaction will make them a "loser", they simply will not make the transaction. Failing to be a big winner is not losing.

              Of course, you can make the same statement about a condemned prisoner choosing whether to die by hanging, firing squad, or lethal injection.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by Anonymous Coward

              If either party feels a transaction will make them a "loser", they simply will not make the transaction. Failing to be a big winner is not losing.

              What a load of oversimplified armchair theory bullshit.
              In reality, you often don't have a choice of not making the transaction! You cannot just say: "No, this apartment is not worth that amount of money, I'm not paying it!" Cause you would be homeless. In the winter. And dead in a couple of hours!
              I've been there. No, there was NOBODY where I could go. No homeless

        • Sometimes those people going to a check cashing place have to have that money right then and there. For example, a poor person's car breaks down, they need a part, they have no savings (they are poor, remember), and if their car doesn't work, they can't get to work (for whatever reason, it happens), so if they don't go to work, they lose their job. They literally do not have a choice to make, either take a loan at an absurdly high interest rate, or get fired, have no car and no way to get a car that runs. N
          • by cduffy (652)

            Re: "get taken by an industry set up to rob you blind" -- a line of credit with a credit union is the better / more responsible choice in that case. Granted, it's very few credit unions that have actually put effort into marketing to the same segment that payday lenders target, but it has been done.

            Speaking to your specific example -- the city I'm in has crappy mass transit, yet I have a friend who fills shifts for a local chain of stores with no car and she gets around by bus just fine. A car can be awfull

      • If you think rich people don't say "you get what you pay for" and poor people never go for the cheapest option then you know nothing about rich people or poor people. Rich people buy iPhones & poor people buy Cricket phones. Rich people buy Mercedes & poor people buy Hyundai. And what the heck, rich people buy Sony TV's while poor people buy Vizio.

        Oddly enough, I've got the Vizio and the Hyundai. But I suppose poor people don't buy EVO 3D's. Maybe that's where I went wrong. But still, poor people do

      • by russotto (537200)

        Meanwhile across town at the habitat for humanity reuse center (and this like 5 min away, ... small town) they were selling 2ghz p4 pizza boxes for 5 bucks each, and they sat there for months.

        Sounds like you missed an arbitrage opportunity. Buy 20 for $5, sell for $100 each on Craigslist.

        • by Osgeld (1900440)

          I bought a couple, cleaned them up and donated them to a church that has a program for computer use... I often donate computers I have no use for, as I am sort of a local go to guy for both the shops in town and a handful of people I often get extra machines that are too old to really waste time selling, but not old enough to be useless in modern application

      • by wbr1 (2538558)
        Poor people also have a habit of buying from rip-off places like Rent-A-Center, where a $300 laptop will probably cost you $1000 in the end. We as a society know the underprivileged make poor financial decisions (or have them thrust upon them by need), yet we still allow the Rent-A-Center and payday and title loan, and check chasing scam companies to prey on them. It's a shame.
    • by nurb432 (527695)

      Even if they 'suck' compared to other brands, they are still an order of a magnitude more powerful than we had 10 years ago. And we got along just find back then.

  • by amoeba1911 (978485) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:25PM (#38633274) Homepage
    I sense Apple lawsuit coming, Apple owns the copyright on rounded rectangles.
    • by getto man d (619850) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:58PM (#38633450)
      FTA

      ...will go on sale by June at a “a price that just doesn’t seem possible,” he said, declining to provide specifics.

      They're stealing one from Apple's pricing scheme too!

    • TV maker Vizio is famous for undercutting competitors' prices on LCD TVs...

      Is Vizio famous for that? Is Vizio famous for anything (other than chart creation software)? On Best Buy, they seem to be listed for a DVD about the Rose Bowl, a single blue-ray player, and a single TV remote control, all at average (or above average) prices.

      It seems a /. editor has just been fooled by a Press Release.

  • ARM? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Am I the only one thinking that this might be driven by some cheap ARM hardware? Only way I can think of to achieve "a price that just doesn't seem possible" in an all-in-one computer.

    • by mirix (1649853)

      Doesn't have to be ARM, there are cheap x86 processors too. Problem is they are also slow.

      Not quite as cheap, I suppose. Guess we'll have to see what their 'unbelievable prices' are.

      Whatever happened to that Chinese endeavour.. Longsoon? Think that was MIPS based.

  • Underengineered (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:28PM (#38633290)
    Vizio products are terribly built. They're fine under perfect circumstances, but the insides are like a freshman EE student built them. Accidentally plug a USB drive into the firmware update port (which accepts a USB form factor)? New motherboard time. Live in a house built before 1978 and took an electrical surge? New motherboard time. And none of it is under warranty. All you can do is plead ignorance and hope for the best.
    • by dgatwood (11270)

      That was the conclusion I came to after reading reviews of their Blu-Ray players a few weeks ago as well. I ended up buying an LG.

      Then again, all the reviews said that Samsung makes some of the best Blu-Ray players, yet both of mine have been train wrecks to various degrees, which is why I'm replacing the worst of the pair with the LG, so....

      • I use all samsung BluRay players in my house. I have the least difficulty with it seeingmy DLNA server on the wireless connection and it ALMOST can play any video file I can throw at it. There is a catch, however. The software is unstable. I've had video freeze the machine enough to need "rebooted" (at least with current firmware, that just means turning it off and back on, where the older firmwares would require unplugging the device). More or less, what they can do on paper is leagues better than anything
        • I constantly yearn for new software updates.

          What happened to all the talk about Chinese manufacturers everywhere embedding mplayer? I want to buy one of those!

    • by dwillden (521345)
      Well your experience is different from what I've seen in their TV's and Tablets. And who puts any electronics directly onto the house power without a surge protector?

      They may not be high end systems but they work. And they don't break the bank. Also most consumers are not opening the cases (as that usually voids the warranty) and thus don't really care what it looks like inside as long as it works.
    • Flat screen TV's are all problematic on repairs (so says the guy who fixes my CRT's but does most of his business on flat screen warranties). Get the extended warranty, hope you get 5 years out of it.

      On inflation-adjusted basis, they cost 25% of what CRT's used to cost, so 5 yrs vs. 20 years seems about right.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 08, 2012 @09:32PM (#38633672)

      In my experience, Vizio's products are very robust. An angry ex-girlfriend threw my 37" vizio LED TV on the floor and stomped on the back. The front bezel cracked off, but it still works perfectly. Pretty amazing for something so thin (the tv, not the ex).

  • by 140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:34PM (#38633330) Journal
    So there is going to be brutal price war in the PC market. And Apothecary wanted HP to get out of that business and was excoriated for it. Now what? Fate of HP (and other manufacturers who threw in their lot with Microsoft) is doomed. Not that I shed any tears for them. Not that any of the PC maker big execs showed any kind of leadership or foresight.

    They agreed to every non disclosure clause from Microsoft, accepted tainted money to keep Microsoft's competitors out, missed every opportunity to set themselves apart from their competition by something other than price. Did any of these geniuses think, "What is the major complaint about the PCs? Lack of security. Let me pitch a line of PCs with Firefox front and center, with NoScript pre loaded. Throw in some OpenOffice free too" when it would have mattered, may be five years ago? Nah, they obediently kow-towed every line drawn by Microsoft and reduced themselves to mere purveyors of commodity boxes. When there is no difference between the brands qualitatively what happens? Price war, gimmicky sales tactics, pre-loading of crapware and nagware. Good riddance. Go die in a price war somewhere clueless idiots.

  • by bogie (31020) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:44PM (#38633356) Journal

    Apple's the only one allowed to use Aluminum in their designs?

    Btw they'll probably keep the cost down by using netbook cpu/gpus. So yea you can have a 27" iMac that does 2560x1440 with a quad core i5 for $1700 or a 27" tv set running at 1920x1080 with a net book stuck to the back for probably $800. Different strokes and all that...

    • Re:Gimme a break (Score:4, Interesting)

      by jo_ham (604554) <joham999 @ g m a i l.com> on Sunday January 08, 2012 @11:29PM (#38634338)

      It's hilarious that Apple is being demonised in this thread for something they haven't actually done. They haven't said word one about the iMac-inspired design (Vizio's CEO quote: [we have] worked on [our] computer designs for two years in attempts to offer an aesthetic that competes with Apple Inc.'s popular products but at a lower price ), but everyone is quick to jump on it.

      They're certainly not the first company to make an All-in-one that was clearly a response to the iMac, and thus far none of those other (and there have been several) designs have faced lawsuits.

      In my opinion it looks ok - I'm not sold on the slender neck, since it feels like the screen might wobble around (although I'm sure it's actually solid).

  • by unrtst (777550) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @08:46PM (#38633378)

    This is just more of the same. I was really hoping that, with Vizio being a big flatscreen maker, they'd just be slapping a PC on the back of them.

    Many big LCD TV's these days have built in network media stuff (netflix, hulu plus, pandora, and loads of more minor players), so they've got some computing guts in them already. I was hoping they'd just up the power a little and bring out an integrated webtv type thing on 55"+ screens, and include a keyboard. If it ran like a real PC, they could even skirt the hulu plus issues (and similar from other providers) since it could be considered a PC. Toss in external storage device support (USB3 + gigabit network) and it'd be a winner.

    But no... it's just another all-in-one monitor and another (likely underpowered) laptop. I wonder if the 27" model will at least have more than 1920x1280 resolution (ie. 2560x1600)?

    • For nor make pc tunner's and cable co's for makeing cable card a joke. Most people use the cable or dish / directv box GUI on there TV. At least the directv DRV's can view some youtube video.

    • I was hoping they'd just up the power a little and bring out an integrated webtv type thing on 55"+ screens, and include a keyboard. If it ran like a real PC, they could even skirt the hulu plus issues (and similar from other providers) since it could be considered a PC. Toss in external storage device support (USB3 + gigabit network) and it'd be a winner.

      Who really wants a gigantic all-in-one costing thousands of dollars that they can't upgrade? Seeing how 55+ TVs alone run at least $1200 for the cheap ones. Add the computer components and you're looking at $2K. Geeks want them separate as they can upgrade either the computer or the screen separately. Average consumers could care less that their 55" TV is a computer. They would rather it stay an appliance. I think that would be a mistake on Vizio's part. Instead they are going for computers to be che

  • Have to take the screen off.

    Now why does all other AIO's make it so much easier to get to the HDD?

  • by DigiShaman (671371) on Sunday January 08, 2012 @09:22PM (#38633596) Homepage

    Once again, proving how disposable hardware is. Got a virus? Need an upgrade? Throw it away and get a new one! The only thing of value is personal data such as pictures and documents.

    The industry will eventually adopt two approaches with how data gets stored. The OS and Apps data will be installed on the build-in drive. All user apps will be stored on a removable drive. That can be flash, or a removable 3.5" HDD. If a drive isn't available, the OS prompts the user to install one so all local profile data can be redirected to it. Optionally, user data can be backed up over the cloud with an account provided. The idea being, if the PC turns into a boat anchor, you simply pull the easy-to-remove drive and toss the machine overboard.

    We live in a disposable society. The numbers back it up. Don't get angry with me, I'm simply pointing out a known fact.

    • That's the basic idea behind cloud + web (or, I suppose, iCloud + iOS + Facebook). Your music, pictures, mail, chat, and documents are just sort of out there somewhere on the network. Do you really care where they are?

      There's a point where when you're the 98% of users who just consume media, write emails, and Facebook you really have no use for a general purpose PC as it's understood today. That's the brutal truth. If you're a student you need more (word/excel), but for that mcjob - do you really use your P

  • They can undercut all they want but their glass is horrible. I bought one of their TVs and told everyone I had it stolen because I couldn't take the picture quality.
  • Do they actually say anywhere that they mean a low price?

  • News with editorial spin along the lines of "OH NOE we can't have MORE budget X the market she will DIE!"

    If I wanted spews I'd go to Betaspews rather than have to step over the poodle puddles.

    If Apple does sue Vizio it's publicity when they will really need it.

  • They sell them at COSTCO alongside Panasonic and Philips and Sony. The quality is not that good, esp. the build quality- knobs housings etc.

    If you need to save 80 bucks that badly, then it lets you get a product that you're otherwise priced out of. But it's not like they fond some way to do the same thing more cheaply through a manufacturing revolution or technological innovation. It costs less b/c it's cheaper.

  • by evilviper (135110) on Monday January 09, 2012 @01:18AM (#38634896) Journal

    PCs are already rock-bottom pricing with tiny margins. Visio isn't going to be able to do anything significant. Maybe their first units will be loss-leaders to try and get into the market, but that's about it.

    Visio is already in the business, remember? Their Android tablet is pretty expensive, at $320 USD on Amazon right now.

    The only unique and cost-cutting thing they could do would be to introduce PCs with ARM (or MIPS) CPUs, instead of x86. I doubt it, but if so, good luck to them. That still won't bring prices down significantly.

A penny saved is a penny to squander. -- Ambrose Bierce

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