Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Data Storage Hardware

ASUS Running Out of Hard Disks 207

Posted by timothy
from the hard-disk-is-good-to-find dept.
The hard drive crunch continues; reader Thorfinn.au writes "ASUS has said it only has hard disk drive (HDD) inventory until the end of November. 'Substitutes for HDD are very few, so if the situation persists, not only notebook production will be affected but also desktops, and other component shipments will also drop,' Asustek CFO David Chang told Reuters."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

ASUS Running Out of Hard Disks

Comments Filter:
    • by galaad2 (847861) on Tuesday November 01, 2011 @08:28AM (#37906462) Homepage Journal

      i found a few pictures of the flooded WD factory here:
      (flip forward in the photo album)

      https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150371103772908 [facebook.com]

    • That's for Thailand alone, they do make 25% of the world's disks. So that 7% drop is significant, but not dire. Other factories can and will kick up production temporarily because of the rising prices.

      • by Guspaz (556486)

        The article doesn't make that clear, although 7% is consistent with the size of the HDD market. But the impact on the market is more severe than that. Anybody using WD as a primary drive brand (for uniformity in enterprise applications) is going to get stuck with massive price increases: The cost of WD drives has more than doubled over the past few weeks, with a 3TB drive going from ~$130 to ~$280. Companies that aren't forced to stick with WD (computer vendors perhaps) will still face the task of validatin

    • the worst flooding in the country for more than half a century

      Well there you go. They built a fab on a known flood plain. I wonder what the actuarial table for that looks like. That is assuming, of course, that WD even bothered with flood insurance [google.com]...

  • Is this the time for ASUS to bring back the SSD netbook? As I understand it, Xubuntu is smaller than Windows 7 and would more comfortably fit in, say, a 32 GB SSD.
    • by Kokuyo (549451)

      Frankly, on a netbook, how would Win7 be less comfortable on those 32 Gigs? Depending on what use you see for a netbook, of course. For me, it's not a mediaplayer and not a gaming rig. So what would I need more than 32 gigs for, even with Win7? Office does not produce files THAT bloated and my email account isn't that overfilled either.

      • by Pieroxy (222434) on Tuesday November 01, 2011 @08:01AM (#37906186) Homepage

        I have a media center at home. I installed Vista about 4 years ago. I let it run and update itself automatically. All data was on other drives (music, pics, recorded TV, etc...). C: was a 30GB partition. I was under the assumption that this was more than enough.

        One day, toughly 3 years after install, the thing displayed a whole lot of error messages and whatnot. I decided to reboot it. The same error messages were displayed, do I dived in.

        C: had filled up entirely. 0 bytes available. So I looked up on the internet and cleaned up what was not necessary - namely all packages and updates ever received through the net were still there and everything that was patched was also backed up. I freed about 18GB in 5 minutes of worthless files.

        As a matter of fact, I just checked my HDD while writing this post. To make sure the size was correct. I only have about 400MB of free space on C:. Time to garbage collect, but this time, I think Vista will be part of the garbage and will be collected as well.

        • by klui (457783)

          You get rid of the backed up system updates via CCleaner (Advanced > Hotfix Uninstallers). But it won't remove the downloaded files so manual remove from %WINDIR%\softwaredistribution\download. I do this after every Patch Tuesday.

          • by Amouth (879122)

            i hope you only do this for your self and not anyone else - god for bid you need to roll one back or use a hotfix that requires a previous update be reapplied.

            • Proof by anecdote, I know, but I've never had any issues cleaning out C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\Download. Now, C:\Windows\Installer on the other hand... Just leave that one alone. Compress it if you want, but don't delete that stuff, or you will majorly screw up subsequent installations/uninstallations.

              Funny enough, this is based on my experiences cramming Windows XP onto a 4 GB Eee PC.

              • by wbo (1172247)

                Proof by anecdote, I know, but I've never had any issues cleaning out C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\Download. Now, C:\Windows\Installer on the other hand... Just leave that one alone. Compress it if you want, but don't delete that stuff, or you will majorly screw up subsequent installations/uninstallations.

                Yes, cleaning out C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\Download is perfectly safe but usually unnecessary.

                Updates are downloaded into that folder and then installed. If the installation of an update i

        • I think you can turn that backup off, or limit the space it uses. It's been a while since I've looked, and since when I got mine the 500GB HD cost about the same as a 30GB drive, I didn't have to worry about having "too many backups."

        • So you didn't bother to understand how your system works, or do any active maintenance of it, and it stopped working?

          What a shock!

          • Manually removing hotfix uninstallers is maintenance that shouldn't need to be done. After a couple months of active use, the PC should assume that the hotfix is a keeper and recommend its uninstall files for removal in Disk Cleanup.
            • by 0123456 (636235)

              After a couple months of active use, the PC should assume that the hotfix is a keeper and recommend its uninstall files for removal in Disk Cleanup.

              Is Disk Cleanup actually usable in modern versions of Windows? In XP it would sit there forever scanning to tell me how much space I could save by compressing my multiple terabytes of files even though I had no intention of compressing anything -- most of it was DV and HDV video I was editing -- and just wanted it to delete the crap that accumulates in Windows over time.

            • by BigDish (636009)

              It's not that simple. There are multiple code branches of Windows (LDR vs GDR) and the old files can be needed for future servicing. Assuming the OP is talking about the WinSxS folder, the OP basically just irreparably broke servicing (adding/removing features and hotfixes/service packs) on this Windows install.

              DO NOT DO THIS.

              • There are multiple code branches of Windows (LDR vs GDR)

                I had never heard of LDR vs. GDR until now, apart from GDR being the former East Germany, so I went to Google and typed in windows ldr gdr. It gave me this post [marc.info]:

                If updates are only delivered from Windows (or Microsoft) Update (including via WSUS), then all the files remain on the GDR branch.

                So in laptop and home situations, where nobody uses anything but Windows Update, what's needed for servicing other than GDR?

                and the old files can be needed for future servicing

                If the method of servicing used by Windows requires keeping 18 GB of unused files around, then

          • by Pieroxy (222434)

            Hmmm. Thanks for your invaluable insight.

            To put that in context, I was answering someone that claimed that 32GB would be enough for an install of Windows 7. I was merely pointing out that this was most likely not true, while at the same time sharing an anecdote that happened at home.

            But rest assured that your most insightful wisdom will be remembered.

          • by jedidiah (1196)

            This isn't rocket science. Some things the machine should be able to handle on it's own. It's there to enable automation. So automate already. If "professionally developed commercial software" can't do better than a few ill conceived hastily constructed shell scripts, then no one should be making excuses for it.

            Cruft simply should not accumulate until the machine stops.

            Yeah. The machine should be smart enough to remove stuff it put there itself and hasn't touched in 2 years.

      • by gbjbaanb (229885)

        Because the standard Win7install requires "16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)"

        Which is the absolute minimum requirements. You'll soon fill the remaining 16Gb up with software updates, applications and data.

        I try to install programs and user data on my D drive, but Win7 still has taken up 30.4 Gb. My untouched-by-me Windows subdirectory takes up 20.8 Gb! (10.9 Gb of which is in that crappy WinSxS directory)

        • by ifrag (984323)

          (10.9 Gb of which is in that crappy WinSxS directory)

          I think Windows actually over reports the size of that due to all the linking in there. About WinSxS. [technet.com]

          • by nabsltd (1313397)

            I think Windows actually over reports the size of that due to all the linking in there.

            According to your link, it's the other way around, in that every bit of the OS is in the WinSxS directory, and the versions in other directories are links.

            But, the real point is that it grows large because Microsoft has determined two things:

            • their patches aren't very good quality, and might need to be uninstalled regularly enough that 4-5 old versions of the same file are required to be kept around
            • people are too stupid to be able to find original media, so every single feature from the OS is placed into Wi
            • their patches aren't very good quality, and might need to be uninstalled regularly enough that 4-5 old versions of the same file are required to be kept around

              You forgot to add that they think it's better to fill up your disk with this crap than to just download it from the internet again if it's needed.

        • Aside the official minimum requirement, a minimal Windows 7 installation out of box will actually use only 10GB. Then of course it will inflate greatly over time, so I agree that 32GB will be quite tight. I have a 40GB SSD and could sometimes have use for more space.
  • I picked up a cheap external 2T Seagate drive yesterday at my local discount supermarket, in their specials sections. I guess that they are not aware of the disk shortage, and thus didn't raise the price on it. Now in a computer or electronics store, it is probably a different story. They have "heard" about the shortage, and thus have raised the prices. If everyone keeps talking about the shortage, the prices will continue to rise, despite the supply. For a while, at least.

  • by madhatter256 (443326) on Tuesday November 01, 2011 @08:09AM (#37906262)

    Because of Black Friday around the corner and other holidays coming up. I tend to buy my large capacity HDDs online due to insanely low prices.

    But now it looks like I cannot afford them and will have to look into buying refurbished hdds.

    Believe it or not, 1/4 of my drives I bought as refurbed and have yet to crap out *knock on wood*, so if you want a cheap large capacity HDD, then a refurb drive might be your only option if their prices do not shoot sky high as the brand new ones...

    I might also have better luck scoring a cheap drive locally...

    • by petes_PoV (912422)

      But now it looks like I cannot afford them and will have to look into buying refurbished hdds.

      Why ever not. Unless your income has dropped dramatically a 1TB or 2TB disk is no less affordable today than it was a year or two ago. All that's happened is that prices have gone BACK to the levels they were at some point in the past. If they were affordable then, they still are today.

      • by swillden (191260)

        But now it looks like I cannot afford them and will have to look into buying refurbished hdds.

        Why ever not. Unless your income has dropped dramatically a 1TB or 2TB disk is no less affordable today than it was a year or two ago.

        Unless your storage demands have grown apace of the normal increase in available capacities.

        • Unless your storage demands have grown apace of the normal increase in available capacities.

          My media collection still requires the same storage space. It's not like the 80's are coming back any time soon.

    • Best Buy has 2TB Seagates for $75, 5900 RPM and five year warranties. Excellent deal right now.

    • by antdude (79039)

      I have two old, used PATA/IDE desktop HDDs that still work iin storage. I wonder if they will be worth a lot now/soon?

  • by LoRdTAW (99712) on Tuesday November 01, 2011 @08:29AM (#37906486)

    I like how one little country that normally doesn't play a big role in the world, is flooded and suddenly its a big deal. How many of the disk makers have factories located there?

    And here I was all set to buy two 2 TB disks.

    • by Xacid (560407)

      My money is based on how gas prices skyrocketed when hurricanes pounded the gulf - despite a large portion of our fuel coming via other routes/means. Just a handy excuse to create a virtual scarcity and thus temporary increase in profit.

      • Consider the notion of going to a college where there are 11 guys per 10 girls.

        No further consider the idea that 9 out of 10 of the girls may already be dating.

        What is the competition for the remaining girl?

        2:1.

        Now you understand why small deltas in availability of a product (apologies to the ladies) may create disproportionate competitive effects.

        • by ihavnoid (749312)

          Great explanation.

          The reason is simple : most of the large PC manufacturers write contracts with the parts manufacturers so that they can buy up to a given number of stuff at a predetermined price. Not only disks, but also DRAM (price known to fluctuate wildly), flash memory, capacitors, etc etc etc. These are the guys who are dating those 9 out of the 10 girls.

          I'm actually quite surprised that ASUS didn't secure a stable supply chain - now they have to shut their business down simply because they can't g

      • by tunapez (1161697)

        When "THE" gas pipeline supplying Phoenix AZ(from Texas via Tucson) broke in '03 gas prices spiked from ~$1.25/g to over $3/g over-night. Nary a word was mentioned in the news/market reports/price volatility about that 'other' supply line from Cali. No mention was made of the fact that we could drive 15 miles North of town and buy gas in Black Canyon City(town) for ~$1.25. I find a lot of the news I hear is tailored to a specific objective that has little to do with the 'news'.

        IE: This summer was "one of th

    • by King_TJ (85913)

      Well, actually, it *is* kind of a big deal, only because the hard disk makers have undergone a lot of consolidation over the years, and the few that remain all chose to put at least a couple of their major facilities in the same location.

      I know Seagate said they're NOT affected directly, as they have no flooded plants - BUT they're having problems sourcing components because one of the largest manufacturers of the spindle motors for drives is located there and was flooded out. I believe the same goes for a

  • My thought was to get a couple of mongo-huge drives and set up basically an internal Linux VPS-host server to hold us off until things get back on track.

    Unfortunately, trying to google what one might do to accomplish that is an exercise in pain (results flooded with VPS hosting companies) and, as much as I love FreeBSD, I'd rather avoid a full architecture shift to use jails.

  • by rrohbeck (944847) on Tuesday November 01, 2011 @02:15PM (#37910932)

    1. Make laptops with 60GB SSDs instead of 250GB HDDs.
    2. Offer them without Windows and package an Ubuntu CD instead.
    3. Sell them at the same price as before.
    4. Profit!

Building translators is good clean fun. -- T. Cheatham

Working...