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Power The Internet Hardware

Iceland's Data Center Push Finally Gets Traction 117

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the time-to-move-your-data-center-again dept.
miller60 writes "Iceland is poised for the completion of its first major international data center project, after years of marketing itself as a potential data center mecca. Iceland offers an ample supply of geothermal energy and an ideal environment for fresh air cooling, but its ambitions were slowed by the global financial collapse. But now the huge UK charity Wellcome Trust has provided funding to complete a new data center in a former NATO facility in Keflavik."
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Iceland's Data Center Push Finally Gets Traction

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  • by Rand310 (264407) on Monday January 18, 2010 @07:21PM (#30814134)
    Wikileaks has a proposal to get a bunch of different free-speech, safe-harbor, journalist-protection style legislation through Iceland so as to both spur this kind of development, as well as provide a political safe-haven for data. Apparently it has caught on pretty well locally, and with a small population it's not particularly difficult to get such legislation passed on short notice.

    http://www.wikileaks.org/ [wikileaks.org]
  • Not news here (Score:4, Interesting)

    by akarnid (591191) on Monday January 18, 2010 @07:52PM (#30814414)
    This has been on the cards for about two years now. Construction at the site stopped last month because politicians wouldn't dare go on with the project because of public opposition. One of the top stakeholders in Verne Global is one Bjorgolfur Thor Bjorgolfsson, former owner of failed bank Landsbanki, whose high-interest Icesave savings accounts failed spectacularly and have kicked off the biggest firestorm in the republics' short history. Also, the bandwidth is not a problem. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenland_Connect [wikipedia.org] (goes to US/CANADA) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DANICE [wikipedia.org] (goes to EU) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FARICE-1 [wikipedia.org] (goes to EU) These are the fiber cables we have. As you can read, we have lots of unlit fiber there.
  • by S-100 (1295224) on Monday January 18, 2010 @08:48PM (#30814858)
    More important is the latency. You're now talking about a significant trip partway around the globe for many users. Even the speed of light takes some time to travel 10,000 miles.
  • by janwedekind (778872) on Monday January 18, 2010 @08:49PM (#30814866) Homepage

    According to the Wikileaks 1.0 presentation [youtube.com] Iceland could pass a bill which will provide a last resort for information which is suppressed in other European countries (currently on the Wikileaks [wikileaks.org] website with a call for donations).

  •     From what I understand, it's really pretty good. A lot of the transatlantic bandwidth goes up and over, rather than straight across underwater. It helps to have repeaters occasionally, and it's nice if you can service them with a quick drive, rather than a submarine dive. :) It's suppose to make for a very nice place to have service, with fast pipes pointing towards the Northeast US and Western Europe.

        In an ideal world, if you had to locate for customers in both the US and Europe, it would be a great place. I know routing doesn't always cooperate as well as you'd like though.

        Way back when, I had servers in New York, and in Germany (among other places). Many European customers complained about the speeds to the German datacenter. Some of those were even in the same city in Germany as our equipment. The ones that sent me traceroutes showed that they were being routed from Germany to New York, and then back to Germany. Needless to say, the latency on that was a nightmare. In the end, we moved all of our European traffic to New York, and we started getting thank you notes from all over Europe. We didn't announce what we did, but they could tell the difference in speed. Most of the customers assumed that we simply changed the operation in Europe. They were completely unaware that they were being served out of New York. Well, except the few who knew enough to run a traceroute. :)

        So, the Iceland datacenters may be a wonderful thing, or they may be a project that dies in it's infancy.

        I know a lot of folks like having their servers within reach. That is, somewhere they can drive to from their home or office in a reasonable amount of time. I've seen with customers all over. Just because they live in god forsaken (and bandwidth limited) nowhere, they'll still host locally.

  • Eastern Canada then? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by atomic777 (860023) on Monday January 18, 2010 @09:36PM (#30815206)
    It seems like the regions of the world where electricity-hungry aluminum production has centered would do well with data centers. Quebec is also endowed with plentiful hydroelectric electricity, ample cooling capacity, local expertise, and most importantly, proximity to large markets. I almost wonder why i don't hear more about data center hosting in Quebec, given the natural advantages
  • by indi0144 (1264518) on Tuesday January 19, 2010 @02:36AM (#30816602) Journal
    nah, just for you. Is this data reliable?

    http://www.internettrafficreport.com/

    How come we (South A.) are tied with N America in relative performance? Less user base ergo better service?

    Funny for those who think that we use "TCP over poisoned darts" : )
  • EVE online, CCP (Score:2, Interesting)

    by egnop (531002) <slashdot@dagevos . o rg> on Tuesday January 19, 2010 @05:08AM (#30817280)

    Now I am wondering if CCP is getting their servers back to Iceland instead of the UK

  •     I actually feel real bad for them. Have you ever monitored large amounts of traffic? The majority is so boring, you wouldn't even want to see it. :) Oh look, someone just updated their MySpace profile. "Lolz, I my kitty jest jumped off me bed! Dat wuz da bomb." [warning: keyword "bomb"] {sigh}

The world is moving so fast these days that the man who says it can't be done is generally interrupted by someone doing it. -- E. Hubbard

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