Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Microsoft Operating Systems Software Windows Hardware

Microsoft Begs Hardware Makers To Take Support Seriously 543

Posted by samzenpus
from the cry-me-a-river dept.
Banana ricotta pancakes writes "Microsoft has confirmed that there will be a widespread public beta of Windows 7 in early 2009, while urging device manufacturers to start immediate testing with its pre-beta release to avoid the widespread hardware compatibility problems that contributed so much to the negative perception of Vista. 'There is not another WinHEC planned before Windows 7 is released,' Microsoft has warned them. Better hope that testing goes well."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Microsoft Begs Hardware Makers To Take Support Seriously

Comments Filter:
  • by NoobixCube (1133473) on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:34PM (#25655965) Journal

    Now that Microsoft are feeling the pinch of competition, they no longer have hardware manufacturers over a barrel. The hardware manufacturers now have the power to control the public perception of Windows, rather than Windows controlling the perception of hardware.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      you linsux users are really delusional, ain't ya? you get 2% market share and you act like you're motherfuckin pascal.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        You posting as AC proves that you know not what you speak of. May I point you here: http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2008/10/how-linux-supports-more-device.html [oreilly.com]
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by theaveng (1243528)

          Whatever. I'd rather use an OS that is supported by >90% of the people, than some other OS. I've already been down the road of non-standard computers (Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga, Macintosh Quadra) and while I loved all those machines, I did not love seeing my IBM PC friends running programs that I could not run. (The "Mac version coming soon" problem.) I like being able to run virtually any program I feel like running.

          >>>...public beta of Windows 7 in early 2009

          Good. Maybe I can buy Win

      • There's more than 2 operating systems, nubbinchops
      • by Tubal-Cain (1289912) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:48AM (#25656631) Journal
        2%? Already?
        The Year of Linux on the Desktop is at hand!
      • by Yvanhoe (564877) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @06:46AM (#25658787) Journal
        The eeePC showed that linux works fine as a preinstalled OS. Its driver structure doesn't change every release in an unpredictable way. That makes it very attractive for computer makers. Microsoft really fears that the eeePC would be the first of a new kind of cheap low specs PCs
    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:45PM (#25656085) Journal
      I'm not sure that really has much to do with it. This isn't about MS keeping the OEMs from shipping other OSes, something that they are still pretty good at, this is about MS trying to get the device makers to ship drivers that don't suck, something that they've never had all that much luck with, though they seem to be very gradually improving.

      MS doesn't have the power to coerce decent drivers out of the manufacturers ("Hmm, I see here that your latest wifi chipset driver has 37 unresolved trouble tickets. If you ever want your silicon to run on Windows again..."); but none of the device manufacturers have anything to gain from manipulating perceptions of windows. If one device vendor makes horrific drivers, consumers will blame windows; but OEMs will just drop that vendor. MS has a bit of power, with their driver certification stuff; but driver quality mostly comes down to the battle between the desire to save money by skimping on engineering and the desire to actually be able to sell products that don't ruin your reputation completely.

      If MS were out there, begging vendors to write drivers for Windows, that would be a role reversal.
      • by rcw-home (122017) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:10AM (#25656309)

        MS doesn't have the power to coerce decent drivers out of the manufacturers

        No, but they do have the power to write drivers themselves (carrot) and they do have the power to maintain a public knowledge base of third-party driver problems (stick).

        Microsoft is only in this mess because they've been pawning that responsibility off on OEMs for years.

        • by EvanED (569694) <evaned.gmail@com> on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:33AM (#25656489)

          No, but they do have the power to write drivers themselves (carrot)...

          What? MS would have the same problem as Linux does, just to a lesser degree. HW manufactures would have to provide specs to MS, something they haven't done for Linux. The only saving grace would be that MS would be capable of signing an NDA with them.

          Microsoft is only in this mess because they've been pawning that responsibility off on OEMs for years.

          "You create a device, you write the driver" seems like a perfectly reasonable policy to me, at least for manufactures that don't open their specs to all.

          • by Hieronymus Howard (215725) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @08:42AM (#25659525)

            Whilst saying "You create a device, you write the driver" is perfectly reasonable, it's less reasonable to say, "We're releasing yet another version of Windows. We need new drivers for all of your hardware. Go away and write them for us".

            This means a lot of extra expenditure for the hardware manufacturers every time that Microsoft release a new version of Windows. Is it surprising that they might be a bit reluctant to comply?

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by maztuhblastah (745586)

            The only saving grace would be that MS would be capable of signing an NDA with them.

            That kinda implies that the barrier for Linux drivers is the lack of devs willing to sign an NDA. AFAIK, that's not often the case. In fact, from what I remember hearing, there have been quite a few developers willing to sign an NDA in order to get documentation -- but manufacturers just don't want the help of the OSS community. MS has the upper hand because 1) they're a corporation, not a random collection of developers and 2) they have money.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by FictionPimp (712802)

          They could also take the long hard road. Realize this next version of windows will take a hit and force all drivers to be signed to be installed. Do the signing for free, but be very selective on what passes as quality.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by gmack (197796)

            Or better yet: they could demand all devices conform to a set standard and then produce drivers for standard hardware only.

            There is no reason for printers to all have different ways to talk to the OS. Same goes for scanners. This could all be standardized.

            I suspect the reason they haven't done this before is that having 1000 devices all needing different drivers is a huge advantage for the incumbent OS. Unfortunately for Microsoft that incumbent OS is XP not Vista so it's all come back to bite them.

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by seanellis (302682)

              This approach has worked very well with USB mass storage devices. The same driver talks to my camera, external hard drive, memory stick and Ogg Vorbis player. It doesn't seem to have stifled innovation any.

              • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

                by TheRaven64 (641858)

                What kind of innovation are you expecting in a mass storage device? You write blocks to them and read blocks back. There are a few things that can be improved - for example allowing the device to re-order requests for more efficient transfers - but not a huge amount.

                Now, compare that with graphics cards. We actually have a standard for these, the VESA BIOS Extensions. This defines a way of initialising the framebuffer, setting the resolution, and even some acceleration functions, such as Bit Blt, off

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by gabebear (251933)
          I own two pieces of hardware that are Microsoft branded... and they have had far worse driver support on Windows than any other hardware I own.
          • MN-720 802.11G PCCard [microsoft.com]: No Vista(or even XP SP3) compatiblity... WHY?
          • Microsoft Intellimouse optical [microsoft.com]: The driver in the link doesn't recognize this mouse... What's really funny is MS's Mac Intellimouse driver works perfectly. This is a rather old mouse, it was one of the very first optical mice available($70 back in the day).

          I may just have bad luck... but Microsof

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by bigstrat2003 (1058574) *

            Microsoft Intellimouse optical: The driver in the link doesn't recognize this mouse... What's really funny is MS's Mac Intellimouse driver works perfectly. This is a rather old mouse, it was one of the very first optical mice available($70 back in the day).

            Huh? This is my mouse of choice, and I have never had any driver troubles with it under Windows. Windows comes with a driver that Just Works, what more do you want?

            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              by supernova_hq (1014429)
              Sure the driver works, I just wish it wouldn't ask me to reboot afterwards...

              Note: I'm not even joking here unfortunately
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          When XP came out, didn't Microsoft end up writing drivers for a boatload of Logitech hardware?

    • by eebra82 (907996) on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:45PM (#25656091) Homepage

      Now that Microsoft are feeling the pinch of competition, they no longer have hardware manufacturers over a barrel. The hardware manufacturers now have the power to control the public perception of Windows, rather than Windows controlling the perception of hardware.

      How did you come to this conclusion? The number of Windows users is still growing. OS X is taking a small percentage from that share, but their software is still restricted to their own hardware, making it very uninteresting for hardware manufacturers.

      It's the fact that Windows is open to any hardware that makes manufacturers prefer this operating system. Also, the two factions live in symbiosis since none would exist without the other. Basically, Microsoft wants their software to work well and the manufacturers surely want their hardware to work well in what is to become the next major operating system that over 90% of the world's population uses.

      • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:15AM (#25656343) Journal
        Well, MS does have one major competitor, which has caused nontrivial trouble lately: its own older OSes. As much as I'd like it to be otherwise, I don't think that MS is under much immediate threat from Linux or OSX. However, watching the rather pitiful attempt to get the Vista launch off the ground suggested quite strongly that MS has a real problem with pushing its "ecosystem partners" to upgrade in sync. The whole Vista Read/Vista Capable thing, where MS basically screwed over buyers and retailers to let Intel unload their old graphics chips, the fact that NVidia couldn't be bothered to have drivers that actually worked for months after launch, having to extend XP availability several times, etc.

        MS isn't going anywhere; but they face a real risk of getting bogged down in their own backwards compatibility. With Vista, they ran into the nasty trap of not being able to muster enough customer enthusiasm to drive support from hardware and software vendors, and not having enough support from hardware and software vendors to ensure safe upgrades for their customers. Vicious circle time. They'll pull through; because they have the bulk and the power; but that isn't a pretty dynamic.
        • by rwyoder (759998) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @02:17AM (#25657303)

          MS isn't going anywhere;

          That is been becoming more obvious every year. ;-)

    • by kbrasee (1379057) on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:58PM (#25656213) Homepage
      Because we all know this is the Year Of The Linux Desktop.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by The Bungi (221687)

      Now that Microsoft are feeling the pinch of competition

      Too bad a large segment of that competition is made up of their own operating systems.

      The only trouble Vista ever had was that XP worked well enough for everybody and didn't offer any incentives to upgrade.

      But it's not like Apple is taking over the world any time soon.

    • by mabhatter654 (561290) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @09:04AM (#25659701)

      You realize what they're really asking... they want OEMS to spend $250K+ of their OWN MONEY so that EACH device they've ever sold works nicely with Windows 7 and MICROSOFT looks good.

      All the Linux detractors really think about that...

      Now think where linux would be if hardware manufacturers spent 1/10 that much contributing drivers to Linux for each device they sold versus the zero they contribute now.

  • Why bother? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by WK2 (1072560) on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:36PM (#25655985) Homepage

    Why would hardware manufacturers bother to write drivers for a Windows Beta release? Especially one that probably won't be released for several years, and the driver requirements and API and such are likely to change several times before then. So many people are happy with XP or Linux, they can wait until the first RC to come out (Microsoft calls it Gold).

    • Re:Why bother? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by QuantumG (50515) * <qg@biodome.org> on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:42PM (#25656055) Homepage Journal

      Maybe Microsoft should do what the Linux community does. Work with manufacturers to get the drivers written and then maintain the drivers for the manufacturers forever.

      Ya, that's likely.

      BTW - I own two webcams now. Neither work under Windows since I lost the driver disk (and those drivers were useless under XP64/Vista anyway), but they both work just fine under Linux. What's the world coming to?!

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by RuBLed (995686)

        What's the world coming to?!

        The Year of Linux on the Desktop

      • by zappepcs (820751)

        What was that slogan? "Plays for sure" It's a long way from that to begging hardware manufacturers to play along nicely.

        Yes, I know they are not related... just seemed appropriate to mention it here having read what has been said already.

      • Re:Why bother? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Techman83 (949264) on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:47PM (#25656115)
        Had the same thing with a cheap ass bluetooth dongle someone gave me. Lost the driver disc, so it got shoved in a box of junk. Been a while since I'd checked that box and no longer use windows as my primary desktop. So after doing a clean up one day I figured, well my pc is turned on so no harm in trying it... Plugged it in, the little bluetooth symbol appeared next to the clock and hey presto it worked!! That was compared to the many many hours spent trying to find a working driver for windows!
        • Re:Why bother? (Score:4, Interesting)

          by nabsltd (1313397) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @01:40AM (#25657047)

          What is with all these Slashdot users who "lost the driver disc"?

          The first thing I do with any driver disc (or any other software, for that matter) is copy it to my install respository that sits on a RAID array and is backed up regularly. I pretty much never clean that up, so I have drivers for hardware I don't own anymore.

          A quick check shows I have Soundblaster drivers from 14 years ago.

          Despite being such a pack rat, and literally keeping everything there (like install source for the last 3 versions of MS Office, every game I've ever purchased, etc.), it only takes up 330GB, which is less than $50 worth of disk space.

      • Re:Why bother? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by vux984 (928602) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:26AM (#25656435)

        Maybe Microsoft should do what the Linux community does. Work with manufacturers to get the drivers written and then maintain the drivers for the manufacturers forever.

        Maybe the community should just step up and write them? I mean they do it for Linux, why not Microsoft? Plus, for any device supported under Linux, the hardest part of the work is already done... figuring out how to communicate with the device.

        And don't whine about driver signing, if a large OSS group came to MS with a large body of updated drivers for x64, they'd take them in a heartbeat, sign them, and even stick them on the next Windows CD if we let them.

        BTW - I own two webcams now. Neither work under Windows since I lost the driver disk (and those drivers were useless under XP64/Vista anyway), but they both work just fine under Linux. What's the world coming to?!

        The difference is the manufacturer abandoned the hardware a couple years ago for Windows, while they never bothered to support Linux at all in the first place. So the community stepped up for Linux, because that was the only way it was going to happen, while the manufacturers did a passable job long enough for the hardware to be non-mainstream enough that most people really don't care.

      • Re:Why bother? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by darkvizier (703808) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:35AM (#25656495)
        Yes... and try installing Windows XP on a RAID array without using a driver floppy disk. Even Houdini couldn't pull that one off! Linux on the other hand is a breeze. The array is automatically detected and the appropriate drivers are installed and initialized.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Narpak (961733)
        Well it is pretty obvious that for every new generation of programmers the amount users, contributors and developers of Open Source software expands. Having at least a general familiarity with Open Source and Linux has almost become a industry requirement. Not to mention that analysing Open Source code to learn is simply a good idea. The program is there, the code is there, you can study it and learn. The code for Windows, and other Microsoft products,is not so easily available.

        At least this is what I hear
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Necroman (61604)

      I'm thinking Microsoft has wised up after the Vista debacle with hardware support. Once Windows 7 hits beta, MS will do their best to keep the APIs the same. My company does some driver development and support for some MS Server services and we like to start at least testing with new OSes as soon as possible so we have an idea of what kind of work is going to be needed to get our stuff to work with the next version of windows.

      Also, for everyone that bitches about Windows changing their API so regularly, y

      • by Joce640k (829181) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:05AM (#25656267) Homepage

        After all the runaround with drivers for Vista, they completely changed the driver model again?

        What kind of idiots are they employing?

      • by 0123456 (636235)

        "well, if you designed your driver in a way that doesn't fit the model the Linux bigwigs want, there is little to no way it will be accepted"

        So, uh, design your driver in a standard way that's compatible with the kernel development model. Or stop whining if you choose to make life difficult for yourself.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Should Microsoft insure that its software compatible with hardware? After all software is a wrapper that allows a comfortable use of hardware.

  • Standards (Score:5, Interesting)

    by PhrostyMcByte (589271) <phrosty@gmail.com> on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:42PM (#25656057) Homepage
    Nearly 2009 and we still can't plug in a printer and have it just work. The idea that any printer - consumer or professional - needs proprietary drivers that might have problems with Windows 7 is really sad. We need more standard HID devices, and better HID support in OSes.
    • Im more annoyed generic drivers are not more common. Even within one manufacturer, we get killed with our Print Server having to contain multiple drivers because the provided generic drivers from the manufactures dont cover a good amount of their printers or if they do are very buggy compared to the specific driver. Though since personally switching to the mac I can never go back to the windows print system in comparison to CUPS.
    • Re:Standards (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:48PM (#25656133)

      HID is a double edge sword. Take USB Mass Storage as an example, if there wasn't one, we might have file system tailor made for Flash memory now.
      But now Mass Storage expose everything in simple linear blocks..., it's just not possible.

      Well, I know the price might probably be much higher with much low adoption rate without Mass Storage HID...

      Talking about Printer, there are actually PostScript standard which work reasonably well, except that you will lost some bells and whistles like Printer maintenance stuff. Microsoft also wants to push its XPS standard, which might be a good HID support candidates.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by setagllib (753300)

        All we need for the flash solution is a revised HID standard that does expose raw blocks. It can still be standard and uniform, just lower level.

        Put it like this. If mass storage did not have the HID abstraction and wear levelling circuitry (primitive though it may be), Windows would have absolutely soiled every flash device out there with its uniquely bad IO layer. At least the raw device is slightly protected from Windows by the standard.

    • Re:Standards (Score:5, Insightful)

      by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:02AM (#25656243) Journal
      Unfortunately, we have the curse of penny-pinching to blame for that one. Printers nice enough to have Postscript interpreters have been just working with nothing more than a ppd for longer than I've been alive. More recently, USB has a standardized printer class, and IPP for network printing is not exactly exotic.

      I don't know exactly why the printers actually available(particularly the cheap ones) have resisted standardization so sharply; but the state of the market is terrible, as you note, despite their being good ways to do it. It isn't like the bad old days of USB webcams, where everybody rolled their own because no standards existed, people seem to be actively doing the wrong thing with printers.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by MrMr (219533)
        How about this:
        Switching printers when the ludicrously overpriced cartridge is empty would be way too easy if you didn't have to install new drivers and support software?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:49PM (#25656135)

    Microsoft doesn't, why should hardware makers?

  • Hardware support? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Tibor the Hun (143056) on Wednesday November 05, 2008 @11:53PM (#25656177)

    Microsoft is concerned about hardware support?
    OK, I can guess that they caught a lot of flak for the recent drivers situation with Vista, but shouldn't they be more upfront about software support?

    Of all the computer problems, how many of us are impacted by hardware? Yes, the hard drives die, and occasionally something will hiccup, but for every one of those issues, there are 10 "my computer is running slower now than a week ago", or there is a crazy file that I can't delete, or "I'm getting notices to buy a spyware cleaner". For all those issues, who do people call? Not Microsoft... Pfft, they call Dell, HP, or whomever they bought their box from.
    So then Dell and HP in turn end up doing Microsoft software support. (Unless they just forward you to Microsoft's call center in India.)

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Nightspirit (846159)

      The biggest problem when Vista was released was shitty Nvidia and Creative drivers. Nvidia drivers were responsible for 50% of vista crashes when it first came out, hence people thought vista was unstable and crap. MS doesn't want a repeat of this for win7.

    • by MeNeXT (200840)

      Yeah I like the one where you right/drag a file in XP SP3 and a new window comes up first asking if you wish to copy or move the file and then you need to once again select if you wish to move or copy the file.

      That's a fun one to explain. User friendly my A**.

    • by Koiu Lpoi (632570)

      "my computer is running slower now than a week ago", or there is a crazy file that I can't delete, or "I'm getting notices to buy a spyware cleaner"

      People need to know there's alternatives. I've been running Mac OS lately, and I'm not wanting to go back. All the power of a full Unix shell with an interface that's miles better than either Windows or Gnome+Compiz. Of course, Ubuntu is definitely getting there for your average person, and it's free.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by philipgar (595691)
        and if OSX or ubuntu had the 90+% market share windows had you'd have the same problem with spyware on them. Much of the spyware is installed by people who don't know what they're doing. This is NOT microsoft's fault. They've actually tried addressing the problem with Window's Defender. As much of the spyware doesn't need root privileges, once it's installed, it's there. If it requires a root kit, than it's the same on most any OS. There will be security holes, and they will need to be patched. This
    • by Shados (741919)

      The very definition of an OEM implies that you're packaging the product and providing support... If I make an application that uses PostgreSQL, sell it, and the user has an issue with the database, they'll call me. Thats just...normal. Dell and HP do the same, just with hardware and software together. Thats also why if you buy an OEM version of Windows (or virtually any software), and you have issues, you can't call Microsoft, because YOU are support. If you buy a boxed copy at Bestbuy though, then you have

  • The white box manufacturer know nothing of the OS. They didn't write it, they don't have the code, they don't even likely have all the documentation. They know how it supposed to run on the machine, but they have no ability to fix errors or look through code to ferret out unexpected and emergent behavior. Furthermore, the average white box manufacturer has a profit margin that is less than 20% of what MS enjoys.

    Yet all the support is farmed out to the manufacture, which farms it out to the call center,

  • by zerofoo (262795) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:34AM (#25656491)

    Microsoft needs to be worried about it's own quality control issues first.

    Network copies were REALLY broken when Vista was released. Copying files to and from a network was excruciatingly slow - how did that get past Microsoft's QA?

    Explorer still occasionally shits the bed for no apparent reason. Why is explorer still the shell of the operating system? Someone should tell Microsoft that Netscape is no longer a threat to them.

    There are a ton of BONE-HEADED design decisions in Vista (try selecting a wireless network with less than 5 or 6 clicks).

    The ugly truth is that hardware manufacturers are not the cause of Vista's "perception problem". Vista is the cause of Vista's perception problems.

    -ted

  • hrrr (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Vexorian (959249) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:52AM (#25656679)
    Dear hardware makers:

    We first take the chance to declare you the cultprits of the vista fiasco, bad hardware makers!.

    Now please be a good boy and support Vista 7 right away, we know this is a sudden move with so few months left for the beginning of 2009 and you are still trying to support Vista. But now we decided to release another OS, so bitch please support that one already, thanks.

  • by KozmoKramer (1117173) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @12:56AM (#25656721)
    The manufacturers should spend more time collaborating with the Ubuntu and Mandriva communities. Windows 7 will suck no matter how much effort the manufacturers put into it. Why waste the extra time on a sinking ship?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 06, 2008 @01:15AM (#25656871)

    Intro: "Microsoft has confirmed that there will be a widespread public beta of Windows 7 in early 2009, while urging device manufacturers to start immediate testing with its pre-beta release to avoid the widespread hardware compatibility problems that contributed so much to the negative perception of Vista."

    Interesting.

    Meanwhile, Linux driver developers are begging to write drivers (at no cost) for hardware OEMs.

    http://www.desktoplinux.com/news/NS6669895837.html [desktoplinux.com]

    As a hardware OEM, you would have to be thinking that it is going to cost you way, way less to get a working driver for your new product written for Linux.

  • by trawg (308495) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @03:42AM (#25657805) Homepage

    ...I'd be already over this after just having had to do it all on Vista. Now they're going to have to go through the same thing immediately, which I suspect most of them won't bother doing, thinking "oh, it's years away from release".

    I don't know if Vista driver support has improved significantly since its release (surely it has; I'm still happily running XP), but I suspect there's still a lot of consumer demand for certain/older driver fixes for Vista that are still on the TODO list for many hardware developers.

  • by Jugalator (259273) on Thursday November 06, 2008 @04:37AM (#25658103) Journal

    Just FYI, they very recently claimed this:

    Microsoft: Moving to Windows 7 Easy for Device Makers [pcworld.com]

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by abigsmurf (919188)
      Just because it's easy doesn't mean device manufacturers couldn't come across unforseen issues if they don't test.

It's later than you think, the joint Russian-American space mission has already begun.

Working...