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Power Communications

Nokia to Replace 43 Million Batteries 72

Posted by samzenpus
from the no-more-burning-phone dept.
mysqlbytes writes "According to a recent post on the BBC's website, Nokia has admitted to a problem in the BL-5C batteries made by Matsushita between December 2005 and November 2006. For some of us, it means longer battery life with a new lease of life and for some of us, no more burnt legs. You can check out the product advisory here."
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Nokia to Replace 43 Million Batteries

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  • Burnt Legs? (Score:5, Funny)

    by pete-classic (75983) <hutnick@gmail.com> on Tuesday August 14, 2007 @11:25PM (#20232823) Homepage Journal
    I understand that this is a legitimate recall. That said, if your phone is burning your legs while it's charging I'm pretty sure you're using it wrong.

    -Peter
    • by SpottedKuh (855161) on Tuesday August 14, 2007 @11:28PM (#20232849)

      That said, if your phone is burning your legs while it's charging I'm pretty sure you're using it wrong.

      Oh, crap. I always wondered why I couldn't walk more than three feet from the wall while I'm charging my phone.

      • Oh, crap. I always wondered why I couldn't walk more than three feet from the wall while I'm charging my phone.

        You think you have it bad? If the lid of a toilet I'm standing in front of accidentally slams down, I can't walk more *two* feet from it until I put the lid back up. Then there's the pain.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by nacturation (646836)

          Oh, crap. I always wondered why I couldn't walk more than three feet from the wall while I'm charging my phone.

          You think you have it bad? If the lid of a toilet I'm standing in front of accidentally slams down, I can't walk more *two* feet from it until I put the lid back up. Then there's the pain.

          Luxury. Why, in my day we didn't have seats or toilets. We used to have to lay it along the ground, six feet from where we were sitting, and hope nobody tripped over it while we went.

        • by krakelohm (830589)
          Try standing all the way up and not just on your knees resting your junk on the bowl.
      • Oh, crap. I always wondered why I couldn't walk more than three feet from the wall while I'm charging my phone.
        Just make sure its on the outside of the leg, or you won't have any reason to find a girlfriend. Someday...

    • That is one f'ing lotta batteries.

      A thousand workers, each exchanging 100 batteries a day, in five day work weeks, for 86 consecutive weeks?

      Ain't gonna happen.

      PS: Can you say mother of all toxic waste dumps?

      • by timmarhy (659436) on Wednesday August 15, 2007 @12:17AM (#20233097)
        hardly. It's not your fault, but most people have a lot of trouble comprehending large numbers of things. I'd guess nokia will simply have all their dealers as collection sites, and have them send the boxes back to them where they will scan the bar code on the battery to mark it as returned and then ship the batteries off to a scrap metal recycler. 43 million would amount to a couple of road train loads.

        i'd be suprised if there was significant labour invovled in the process.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Hognoxious (631665)

          I'd guess nokia will simply have all their dealers as collection sites
          Thanks for pointing that out, it's completely different. So the dealers are entirely staffed by robots - who'd have though it?
        • But Nokia still gotta cough up with 43M new batteries. And they can't use whatever spares they have lying around, as they're likely to be affected, too. that has to take up some labour (and time)
        • So not only are they being a fair and responsible company...but their creating jobs too!
    • by RuBLed (995686)
      I bet it was on vibrate mode while charging to cause a burning sensation on a part of the lower body.
    • Re:Burnt Legs? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 15, 2007 @12:38AM (#20233207)
      I wonder seriously about this. I put in the code from the back of my battery and the site cheerfully informed me, "Your battery may be replaced". Great, I thought. I'll just pop in my contact info and they'll mail me a new one. Great, right??

      Uhm...next page says, "Your battery will NOT be replaced". Think they coulda told me that BEFORE I put in my contact (marketing) info?

      I smell a scam here. Or at least, scummy tactics.
  • by willpall (632050) <pallwill-slashdotNO@SPAMyahoo.com> on Tuesday August 14, 2007 @11:28PM (#20232845)
    Link to forum thread [worsethanfailure.com]
  • Go a replacement battery from Apple with the Sony recall a few months ago, just as my powerbook battery was on it's last legs.

    Thought I was going to get lucky again as my year and a half old 6230i's battery is heading downhill at the moment.

    Was fairly sure it was unlikely when I opened up the phone and the battery said made in Hungary and sure enough it's not one of the affected ones.

    Oh well, maybe next time :-)

  • Admitting? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by glitch23 (557124) on Tuesday August 14, 2007 @11:59PM (#20233019)
    "Admitting" seems a bit strong. There is no evidence yet of them denying the matter. It just takes time for reports to come in and see that there is a pattern forming and *realize* all those issues may not be coincidence. "Admitting" to there being an issue implies they were trying to cover up something. At least that's the way I view it. I don't see any wrongdoing, yet.
    • "Admitting" seems a bit strong. There is no evidence yet of them denying the matter.

      Not really. All that saying they admit there is a problem means is that they came out and said "guys, we have a problem with the following batteries". It has absolutely nothing to do with a possible cover up.
    • by malsdavis (542216)
      Particularly as the problem isn't that major anyway. When other companies are only now recalling children's toys that for months were known to be coated with lead paint, I think Nokia must be commended for offering to replace batteries quickly for such a lesser problem.

      Companies should be heavily criticized for being bad, but also praised for being good.
  • WTF Javascript (Score:2, Informative)

    by nytrokiss (1097437)
    Yes they have this massive WTF on there website script! http://forums.worsethanfailure.com/forums/thread/1 27881.aspx [worsethanfailure.com]
  • Ears maybe... Butt maybe... but legs? huh?
  • I just bought a new Nokia a new months ago and it has this battery in it.
    Never had any trouble with it but if I get a new one, I'm ok with that.
  • they wont ever have to replace any batteries. ;)
  • Oh no! (Score:3, Funny)

    by evilviper (135110) on Wednesday August 15, 2007 @12:36AM (#20233199) Journal
    Oh no, no... You've got it all wrong. I've seen countless PR people on TV and they all say the same thing... It's only cheap, off-brand batteries that explode, NEVER the manufacturer's own batteries.

    The news media, of course, never argues the point.
  • How do they get the number 43?
    • by Sloppy (14984)
      It's one of those 10^6 vs 2^20 things, like with hard disk capacities. You can call it either 46 million batteries or 43 MegaBatteroids, depending on whether you're trying to make it sound big or small.
  • None is affected.

    I wonder how Nokia comes to the conclusion that "46 millions batteries" is "very rare" (quoted from the advisory).
  • Risky business (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Taagehornet (984739) on Wednesday August 15, 2007 @05:24AM (#20234239)
    I bet Nokia's rather happy they didn't solder the battery onto the board, but opted for the replaceable solution.

    Considering that every month brings with it a new story of a major hardware manufacturer having to recall xx million devices due to faulty batteries, I'm impressed that Apple had the guts to go for non-replaceables.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Zebedeu (739988)
      Yeah, but Apple would never have this kind of problem because they get their batteries from reputable suppliers, like Sony.
  • As batteries pack in increasing amounts of power in smaller and smaller enclosures, their explosive power also increases.
    At some point, with the "right" power density, just shorting a battery may be enough to cause a powerful explosion.
    IANAL, but I think the time is ripe for the law to recommend safety guidelines for batteries. At a minimum, maybe all batteries should come with an inbuilt fuse.
    • by Detritus (11846)
      An internal fuse will not help if there is an internal short in a lithium battery. This can be caused by a manufacturing defect or physical abuse.
  • Not all 43 million batteries need replacing, dimwits! Only a small batch manufactured by Matsushita. You need your battery's serial number to check whether it belongs to that particular batch, mine didn't. If it doesn't, _IT WILL NOT BE REPLACED_.
  • Matsushita = Panasonic
  • ...and other low end models - some of Nokia's best selling phones. I wonder how many of the end users will even bother to send their batteries back, but still, that's gotta hurt.

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