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Displays Hardware

Rollable E Ink Displays Get Real 116

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the just-don't-crease-it dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Two years ago Philips unveiled a prototype of a functional electronic-document reader, called the Readius, which could unroll its display to a scale larger than the device itself. Unfortunately, that was only a prototype. According to Cnet, however, Polymer Vision, which spun out from Philips in 2006, has redesigned the Readius and turned it into a real product that it is going to be available by the end of this year. There are some notable differences between this Readius and the prototype version, in particular, the ability to display 16 shades of grey instead of just 4 and the connectivity options. What doesn't make sense though, is given the energy efficiency and easy-to-read high contrast functionality of E Ink, why other than Motorola with its Motofone, has no other cell phone manufacturer incorporated E Ink technology into its handsets?"
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Rollable E Ink Displays Get Real

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  • Why? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by RootWind (993172)
    I'm assuming the other companies don't think the cell phone providers will be willing to provide "low-end" phones that don't have the capability to provide full "nickel & dime" profits. Frankkly, I'm not sure the Motofone will make it to the U.S.
    • Oh, it's coming (Score:3, Informative)

      by evil agent (918566)
      this summer [suntimes.com]. Everyone who's been saying, "I just want a phone that's just a phone" might just get their wish.
      • But you can already get "just a phone."

        My old LG TouchPoint 1100 finally broke a hinge last week, so I had to give in and buy a replacement. Unfortunately, I need a phone without a camera, and I wanted something cheap and basic.

        I was impressed to find the LG LX150 [phonescoop.com] available. This is as close to "just a phone" as you're going to get - no camera, no mp3, no wifi, no memory card slot - just a phone with bluetooth, the usual polyphonic sound, and minimal game and internet support. So far, I'm really impresse
        • The people that bitch about wanting "just a phone" are really saying they don't want anyone to have any other choice. Otherwise, why would they complain about not being able to get something they can already get?
    • by celardore (844933) *
      What's more is that cellphone companies (at least here in the UK) are pushing the multimedia aspect of mobile telephony. They probably feel that consumers aren't interested in a "low power" device, and are more interested in watching sports events or viral video clips. I personally don't care if my phone uses more power to display pretty colours. I like the pretty colours, and the phone goes on charge nightly anyway.

      Not to say I'm not worried about my power usage, things like my storage heaters and ov
    • by msobkow (48369)

      Personally I think it's just that the power consumption of cheap LCD's is pretty trivial compared to the milliamps used to send and receive RF signals. Transmission of voice or data is much more expensive than passive receipt. You burn more power in a five minute cell call than your display probably uses in 30 minutes or more.

      • by Moodie-1 (966737)
        That's very interesting. How about providing some factual references to back up that claim?
        • by msobkow (48369)

          Let's try basic physics. How much power does a 3.5W signal take to produce, for example? Now how many milliwatts does an LCD take in comparison? If you want bean counter references for the obvious, hit the search engines.

        • Wouldn't it also be made evident by the shorter "talk time" than "stand-by time" for phones?
          • by steveg (55825)
            On the other hand, keep in mind the significantly shorter battery life of phones with color displays as opposed to those with "basic" black and white LCD. The display technology in that case *does* affect the battery life.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Razed By TV (730353)

      What doesn't make sense though, is given the energy efficiency and easy-to-read high contrast functionality of E Ink, why other than Motorola with its Motofone, has no other cell phone manufacturer incorporated E Ink technology into its handsets?

      E-Ink has yet to be tested wide scale on America's consumers, or any consumers, really. Technologically, for a number of cell phone users (at least in the U.S.), it is a step backwards. We already have bright screens with a number of colors. The cell phone is a s

      • by URSpider (242674)
        What doesn't make sense though, is why hasn't the Motofone been released in the U.S.? The Motofone got a bit of hype, and a number of people have said it would be great to have a phone that is a phone and is good at it. A number of articles made the rounds on the net, including at Engadget and Gizmodo. Despite this, Motorola is dragging its feet getting it to the U.S., and if you want to import it, you have spend twice what it's worth. Makes me wonder, what's taking so long?

        As another poster mentioned, Moto
    • Don't worry, a conspiracy-uncovering documentary like this one [imdb.com] will explain it all... Only the centralized planning (preferably, in the 5-year periods) can alleviate the so called "free market"'s constant failures and get the real innovations adopted without delay.

      Gebyy zr ohggbpf...

  • Thats definetly one for the scrolls...
  • Audiobooks (Score:2, Interesting)

    by cerberusss (660701)
    I used to be really excited about this technology, thinking I could bring a bunch of books and articles in my pocket and read them whenever I needed to wait.

    Then I discovered audiobooks. Just put them on your MP3/Ogg player and listen to them everywhere where you need your eyes but not your ears -- in the car, on your bike, cleaning the kitchen, et cetera. I'm working my way through the entire 20 piece science fiction/fantasy book series of Pern [wikipedia.org], written by Anne McCaffrey. Absolutely great.
    • Re:Audiobooks (Score:5, Insightful)

      by zyl0x (987342) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @11:50AM (#18060290)

      listen to them everywhere where you need your eyes but not your ears -- in the car, on your bike
      I certainly hope that's some kind of joke. Do you have any idea why cyclists get hit by cars?
      • It's okay: in this case it assists concentration. The Pern series, like pedaling, is an exercise in repetition.
      • by kamapuaa (555446)
        Because bicyclists are incapable of listening to music and paying attention to the traffic around them?
        • Re:Audiobooks (Score:5, Insightful)

          by harves (122617) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @12:48PM (#18060664)
          Grandparent post has a good point. I'll see if I can add to it.

          Most cyclists don't have rearview mirrors; they use their ears. They can tell a car is just-behind-and-to-the-left or riding-my-arse by the engine noise. You can hear that fool doing twice the speed limit well before he passes you, assuming you can hear. Now, yes, I agree: every cyclist needs to look around and be aware of the traffic around them, the same as a driver in a car. But would you drive a car with *no* rearview mirrors at all? By shutting off your ears as a cyclist you are doing the same thing.

          Yes, I'm a cyclist. I ride in traffic. I don't wear my iPod unless I'm on a separate cycleway/path. I would use a rearview mirror if I could find one that actually works.
          • With some open headphones, you could easily listen to an audiobook and hear cars approaching. Sure your concentration might be a bit off, but I'm sure you're generally thinking about things while biking anyway.
        • by dbIII (701233)

          Because bicyclists are incapable of listening to music and paying attention to the traffic around them?

          They are quite capable of listening to music and pedalling until the day they die - noticing that idiot changing lanes into your kidney is a different story. As a cyclist you need to assume you are either invisible or you have a big target drawn on your back to make it easier for rednecks to run you off the road. Wearing headphones on a bicycle while riding in traffic is stupid and is illegal in some pl

      • Re:Audiobooks (Score:4, Insightful)

        by cerberusss (660701) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @03:03PM (#18061520) Homepage Journal
        'scuse me? I'd rather have a cyclist listen to an audiobook than a driver making a hands-free phonecall. Also, I live in a country where there are separate lanes for cyclists. Keep the volume low and the eyes open.
        • by Ztream (584474) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @06:07PM (#18062684)

          I'd rather have a cyclist listen to an audiobook than a driver making a hands-free phonecall.

          I didn't know the two were mutually exclusive.

          By the way, you seem to be from The Netherlands, the country that taught me to stop watching out for cars and start watching out for deadly bicycles :). I still do this back in Sweden even though it is totally unnecessary here.

          • I didn't know the two were mutually exclusive.
            They aren't of course, but since the parent made a good point, I thought I'd use a fallacy to reply ;-)
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Firehed (942385)
        Because they have the volume way too damn loud. I ride my bike with headphones on all the time - I just don't use my noise-canceling ones, nor do I put the volume even close to a point where I can't hear cars coming.

        I'd be a lot more concerned about drivers listening than bikers. At least on a bike, you have to do something to keep moving.
      • by QuantumG (50515) *
        Because, although they can only do 30 km/hr at the best of times, they feel the need to ride in traffic like they're a fuckin' car.
        • Yeah. I can do over 18.5 miles/hour on my mountain bike, EASY. I can do over 25 miles/hour (40 km/h) on a road bike. Where I ride (Boston, MA), traffic often goes much SLOWER than I do, especially when I'm commuting to work.

          The numbers I quote are for an average person who is in their mid thirtys, and not a hardcore rider. Have you seen the Tour de France? Those guys are going WAY in excess of 30km/h, on road bikes. They can average in the low to mid 50's.
          • Re:Audiobooks (Score:4, Insightful)

            by QuantumG (50515) * <qg@biodome.org> on Sunday February 18, 2007 @10:01PM (#18063864) Homepage Journal
            It still aint 60 km/hr and if you're in traffic going 60 km/hr then you need to do at least 50+ or you are going to cause an accident.. that's if you're in a car or on a bike. Really, it isn't a matter of velocity, it's a matter of acceleration. If you can't start and stop at the same rate as the rest of the traffic, you're a hazard. This is why bike lanes are a good idea.. and yes, they should be everywhere.
    • by cfvgcfvg (942576)
      The problem with audiobooks is that there is next to no educational content available. I have searched high and low (mostly high) and found pretty much only "self help" and "personal achievement" material. There are a few Stanford lectures for free on itunes, but mostly current issue type stuff, nothing of real great educational value.

      I had a job for 5 years that required driving 1 hour to and from every day. I thought it was such a waste that I couldn't study for some university courses via audio material

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by BigLug (411125)

        I'm certain LibriVox [librivox.org] would be happy to record some more 'educational' books .. only they only have access to works in the public domain. Everyone else seems to want to be paid for their work. Because of this, most of their books are very old. Educational works that are old enough to be in the public domain will likely teach that the sun orbits the earth :)

        If you have a source for public domain works that you'd like to hear as audio books, that's the place to submit them.

        Cheers!
        Rick Measham
        (disclaimer:

      • Check out some podcasts... search for php|architect's Pro PHP podcast, IT Conversations, Open Source conversations.
    • As a visual learner, I find audio books to be a complete waste of my time... without a visual aid to help me stay focused my mind quickly wanders when I've tried listening to audiobooks. Sure, some readers can raise the level of interest with a nice reading style, but even then I still can't stay focused on them. C'est la vie.

      It'd certainly be nice to be able to go to the library (or library website) to get material for a device like this "on-demand" instead of what can be a long, long, long, wait for the
      • by svunt (916464)
        I'm exactly the same, every time I've played an audiobook, I find myself actually reading something else within five minutes, as there's no focus on an audiobook, too easy to multitask and lose the thread.
    • by ronrib (1055404)
      Audio books are great, until you find one read by Tim Curry
      Though remembering the Harry Potter books in a British accent does give it some kind of charm.
    • by Builder (103701)
      Stupid question, but where are you getting these audiobooks ?

      I tried audible in the UK, but they have a very limited selection, especially in the SciFi genre.
    • My favorite audio book is "The Joy of Reading" by Charles Van Doren.
  • by CRCulver (715279) <crculver@christopherculver.com> on Sunday February 18, 2007 @11:19AM (#18060058) Homepage
    So what exactly is the temperature at which e-books burn?
    • by Teresita (982888)
      So what exactly is the temperature at which e-books burn?

      The laser in my DVD burner doesn't have a corresponding black-body temperature.
    • Wel, most ICs start to lose their composition around 120C or 250F, So I suppose the updated title would be "Farenheit 250"
    • "So what exactly is the temperature at which e-books burn?"

      Sony engineers are already hard at work on that problem!
  • Because this device isn't there yet.

    It has indeed been over 2 years since this was announced. I wonder what is going wrong ? Are these displays too expensive ? Too many patents ? Difficulty in designing ? What is going wrong here ?
    • by mblase (200735) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @12:15PM (#18060440)
      It has indeed been over 2 years since this was announced. I wonder what is going wrong ? Are these displays too expensive ? Too many patents ? Difficulty in designing ? What is going wrong here ?

      They're not expensive compared to LCDs, but they're expensive compared to paper. Since e-ink is supposed to make cheap and portable e-books a reality, you need to have an e-book that's cheap enough for consumers to want--the technology isn't well-suited to anything but static text and images, so you can't try to sell an e-book that, for example, also plays video games.

      Since more people want to make phone calls than read books, e-books need to be pretty darned cheap to sell well (schools could be a prime market, but they're all broke, too). Personally, I wouldn't buy one until it broke the $99 barrier AND was as small and portable as a paperback book, and they haven't gotten to that point yet.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        you can't try to sell an e-book that, for example, also plays video games.

        I would be happy to have sit and read while listening to music. If my music player/book interupted me for incoming phone calls, that would be an incredibly convenient bonus. It's actually something I've complained about before with my phone, that the music player is great, the ability to take calls is obviously a necessity, but the inability to read text without going cross eyed is a major headache, and I stand on the train to and fr

  • amazingly ink-like (Score:5, Informative)

    by v1 (525388) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @11:27AM (#18060124) Homepage Journal
    A friend brought over a non-rollable unit (think tablet) that was loaded up with several books. It uses that E-ink also. I don't recall who makes it, (phillips?) but it was easy to read with just ambient light in the room, and had a backlight for low light use. The screen looked like crisp jet-black typeset ink on a slightly off-white page, it was very easy to read and did not put any strain on the eyes. It did take a second or so to switch pages though which I was not expecting. I don't know if that was a limitation of the device or of the screen, but when it switched it was a snap switch, not where you see the text being drawn vertically.

    It wasn't very portable in the modern sense though. This unit was about 5.5" x 8", hardly pocket-size. I don't know how portable they will be able to get these - you can only roll it in one direction, so at best that one would have to be at least 5" in some direction. This screen was perfectly flat of course, and I wonder how much it would mess with your vision to read a page with a curl or warp to it? I know it bugs me to try to read a newspaper if it's not laying flat. I suppose this would be ideal for say, a long plane flight or while waiting for a connecting flight at a gate.
    • by nomadic (141991) *
      It did take a second or so to switch pages though which I was not expecting

      The burst of incredibly annoying static between page switches is the sole reason I haven't gotten a Sony Reader. I'm hoping someone figures out a way around that issue.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by wbd (88361)
        Actually, it does that intentionally so I doubt there will be a way to "get around it". It's not static, it's the entire page going solid black for an instant. This apparently is to prevent "burn in" of the e-ink "pixels" which definitely does happen. I noticd ghost images of large text from a previous page occasionally when I played with the Sony Reader in the local CompUSA.

        But at $350-$400, forget it. I'm getting an eBookWise reader at $124. www.ebookwise.com.

        It's a more evolved version of the ol
    • I work for the Department of Redundancy Department,where I am employed.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by vanyel (28049) *
      I have a Sony Portable Reader --- in fact since, surprisingly, no one here seems to have reviewed it, I'm trying to find time to write one, but it must use different E-ink technology. It doesn't have a backlight, and the contrast degrades rapidly with the light. If there's a lot of light, it is quite readable, and the background even looks white, but with just a single lamp or a couple normal incandescent lights, it goes gray with a very slight greenish cast. Admittedly, I've been reading most of my book
    • by mdielmann (514750)

      This screen was perfectly flat of course, and I wonder how much it would mess with your vision to read a page with a curl or warp to it? I know it bugs me to try to read a newspaper if it's not laying flat.

      From the pictures in the article, as well as some of the text, this reader has a rigid backing with hinges to allow it to wrap around itself. When unrolled, it should still be quite rigid, and flat. This won't solve the minimum length being the shortest edge, but I'd love to have a rollable 5" x 8" eBook reader.

  • First of all, i REALLY want one of these.

    Secondly, i think that concentrating on the applications of E-Ink in mobile phones is a bit limited. The capabilities of E-Ink paper are much bigger than just for mobile. Sure, having a clearer mobile display might be great, but i want to see other innovative uses for this technology. I would love to be able to read a paper made of E-Ink paper (a la minority report) and other such things.
  • by SuperBanana (662181) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @11:34AM (#18060190)

    What doesn't make sense though, is given the energy efficiency and easy-to-read high contrast functionality of E Ink, why other than Motorola with its Motofone, has no other cell phone manufacturer incorporated E Ink technology into its handsets?

    It can't display video, or serve as the display for a camera phone. Seriously- the update cycle on eInk is up to half a second or more, something they don't like to talk about. That makes it a pain even for scrolling through your address book.

    Related rant: All I want is a phone with a extendable antenna for good reception, a message indicator LIGHT (my SE phone has a message indicator on the screen, but the screen goes blank or to a clock. It even HAS a LED in the joystick, but it's not used for anything!), bluetooth, and a fully functioning address book (ie: I want to be able to see an address, not just a #, and I want the phone to support contact groups in iCal.)

    Why won't anyone make it? If they do make it, why aren't they doing a better job of marketing it? I understand all the cameraphone crap is to get me to buy more services; I don't give a shit about video or MMS or cameraphones, and I'm unlikely to EVER buy those services- so just sell me a GOOD PHONE. And NO, I don't want a large phone, even if it does run Linux...

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      It can't display video, or serve as the display for a camera phone. Seriously- the update cycle on eInk is up to half a second or more, something they don't like to talk about. That makes it a pain even for scrolling through your address book.

      Which means people are missing the point. This technology should be set around a different target: the dedicated e-Book reader. I want two pages, the size of a comfortable paperback, that fold together to make an ultra-thin folder-like book. It doesn't have to roll u
      • I don't know any eBook readers with two pages (probably because that'd mean two eInk screens, and those are still expensive), but otherwise, the market already has what you want. Have a look at the list of readers here [wikipedia.org]. Personally, I've got a Jinke eReader since it's on the cheaper end of the scale ($350), while still working great and having all the features I really need. As a result, I read more now than ever before, with my whole library with me all the time, readily accessible.
    • by pimp0r (1030222)
      About related rant:
      For the message indicator light, get a Siemens phone with Dynamic Light.
      (I guess second-hand since Siemens no longer makes mobiles... )
    • by 1point618 (919730)

      I bought one of these [esato.com], and my god, it's the best phone I've ever owned, having also owned a Motorola Slvr L6 and a V330. It actually has everything you wanted but the extended antenna, but it has great reception. It also has the message indicator light and bluetooth. The address book might not be up to snuff for you though, it was released pre-OS X and I imaging it doesn't support OS X, and putting in address are a bit of a pain. Also, it's GMS, but only a tri-band phone, but won't work some places (like my

    • My Samsung SGH-E780 [jucaushii.ro] does quite a few of those.

      It's smaller than a Razr (which it replaced, Motorola's software is slow and unintuitive), but has a bigger keyboard. The outside screen is actually a mini-screen and some LED-driven indicators on the top that show you a clock, network reception, battery life, and the presence of an SMS message

      It has Bluetooth connectivity, and supports contact groups (no idea about iCal connectivity though). The contact info lets you specificy a ton of info like e-mail, 3 phone
    • by DrYak (748999) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @03:30PM (#18061712) Homepage
      Why ?
      It's a small creature saying "feep !".

      My almost-10-years old Ericsson T39 (dating before "Sony-" started appearing in front). Had and still has today all this : Bluetooth (for being used as a modem on my other equipment) with GPRS, extensible antenna (although as an option), and low power consumption (even had an optionnal huge LiMH replacement for the polymer battery that could last up to one week).

      It's good enough and I'm still using up to today. Only now I begin to consider changing it because UMTS sounds interesting...

      The reason you can't find such things ?
      Feature creep. When everyone changes phones each year for free with his tarif plan, companies have a hard time trying to be "the one" elected by the consumer for the next cycle. So their overbloat their phone with semi-useful functions and then hope that the consumer will pick to one with the most marks in the checkbox on the label at the shop.

      Or they go for the cheapest phone, and not only remove things not necessary in a phone (like the webcam) but also functions that could be used to connect the phone to other device that could provide the function (the phone doesn't need internet connection. The Laptop or the Palmtop *DO*) and you get no UMTS, EDGE, GPRS, Bluetooth or IrDA (and sometime, no other connector except a charger port).

      So they either produce Everything-including-the-kitchen-sink phone, or the cheap crap-phone, but no "give-me a basic phone and let my use my laptop for everything else".
      The one company that gets that right *AND* that use some standart connector (so that we don't have to buy a new round of charger and such accessories everytime a new model is out) would have definitely a market.
  • With refresh times measured in seconds, this tech isn't ready for any mobile phone. Only for tablet readers is it any good, when you actually hae time to wait for the page to turn.
    • I could be useful for a secondary display, for when the main one is too small.

      Think about a GPS.
      They usually have small screen (in the phone or palmtop range), which are good at showing an overhead view of the car with only the current intersection visible.
      With a second eInk display, if you need a more wide point of view, you could just unroll a bigger (laptop-range of size) blach and white map of the region you are in. If you don't drive at the speed of the jet, the map itself doesn't change that quickly a
  • People like colour, if this tech was introduced 7 years ago it would have been popular. For low end phones it will be useful, it will also be good for devices where colour isn't really needed.

    Also, a colour version which could play video would look rather different to a normal computer display. It would be using reflective colours instead of transmitted. Everyone is used to high resolution printouts from their inkjet or fairly low resolution TFT screens. A display using e-ink that is colour would be a mixtu
    • by mblase (200735) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @12:10PM (#18060404)
      For low end phones it will be useful, it will also be good for devices where colour isn't really needed.

      Like a book, you mean?

      The idea of e-ink isn't that it's b&w, but it's very low-power -- you only need to use electricity to update the screen, and after that whatever's "written" on the "page" is permanent until it's updated again. Very useful for e-book readers, not very useful for phones or much of anything else.

  • Want a Readius?
    No thanks -- I'll roll my own.
    Why, you must be from Holland.
    Sure, aren't you?


  • by rsanta74 (1003253) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @12:50PM (#18060674)
    you can roll, but can't smoke.
  • call me when... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by FudRucker (866063) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @01:45PM (#18061034)
    i can get a big screen television that sticks to the wall like a large poster or glued on like wallpaper...
  • I want a phone or PC with a small display that rolls out to get bigger when I need it. Like a phone with a 5"x2" screen that pulls out to a 5"x10" screen in the upper half of the clamshell. And a 12-key pad in the bottom half that folds open again sideways into a 4" wide QWERTY keyboard. A WiFi/Bluetooth hub for other devices, like an extra "CPU server" that can sit in a bag, coat pocket, or across a network.

    I want to see "convertible displays" destroy the distinction between mobile "phones" and "PCs" forev
  • by lucyfersam (68224) on Sunday February 18, 2007 @02:21PM (#18061262)
    The reason none of these rollable devices have been brought to market yet is not the E-ink display, their grey scale display is quite good, and already used in consumer products (the Sony E-reader for example). The problem is the flexible back plane needed to drive the display. Currently, every system demonstrated including the Readius uses organic polymers for the drivers, which have a shelf life of a couple of days if you're lucky. They are incredibly sensitive to moisture, and the only system so far capable of protecting them requires the deposition of many layers of transparent metal oxides, which alone cost somewhere in the range of $60/ square foot. Anytime you see news about a flexible display, look to see if they are using organic drivers, if they are and they don't explicitly address the moisture issue, the product will never reach consumers.
  • What doesn't make sense though, is given the energy efficiency and easy-to-read high contrast functionality of E Ink, why other than Motorola with its Motofone, has no other cell phone manufacturer incorporated E Ink technology into its handsets?"

    1. This sentence is a little run-on.

    2. This sentence is a declarative ("What doesn't make sense..."), so it should not end with a question mark.

    3. This is another stupid question at the end of a summary. People want color (preferably at least 32,000 color) displays

    • While we are correcting things from my point of view the above poster cannot spell colour correctly. As you can see from that statement correcting grammar and spelling on an international forum like this is offtopic, pointless and annoying. So long as people have interesting things to say why bring out the red pen?
      • by SeaFox (739806)

        While we are correcting things from my point of view the above poster cannot spell colour correctly.

        The spelling I gave is most certainly correct. [reference.com] It is the American spelling of color and has been in use for over a hundred years. Ironic note: Firefox's spell checker is flagging your spelling of color as incorrect right now as I type this. But I'm not going to make the same mistake you are, because I actually recognize that "colour" is the British English spelling of color and that Firefox is flagging it bec

        • by dbIII (701233)
          I think the point was completely missed - please read it again and note the word "international". You are also correct that this entire grammar checking thing is intensely boring, pointless and offtopic - which was my other point. Please give people a chance to write text without pointing out errors in their grammar.
    • by shojo (730836)
      1) It is not a run-on. It is a complex sentence with three subordinate clauses and one independent clause. The independent clause is a question.

      2) There is no such thing as a"little" run-on

      3) correcting someone's grammar is rude.

      4) I am rude
  • grayscale porn just doesn't cut it.
  • What doesn't make sense though, is given the energy efficiency and easy-to-read high contrast functionality of E Ink, why other than Motorola with its Motofone, has no other cell phone manufacturer incorporated E Ink technology into its handsets?"

    Phone manufacturers are more interested in bright, vibrant, color displays that look attractive. The efficiency gains aren't a big advantage given the frequency with which people are used to charging their phones, and the readability is only an issue when reading
  • What doesn't make sense though, is given the energy efficiency and easy-to-read high contrast functionality of E Ink, why other than Motorola with its Motofone, has no other cell phone manufacturer incorporated E Ink technology into its handsets?

    Why would it make sense to use e-paper (or e-ink, whichever term you prefer) for cell phones?

    How much energy do you think the LCD screen on a cell phone consumes? Keep in mind that for most people, the LCD screens and their backlights are on only a fraction of

    • by lucyfersam (68224)
      For refence, E-ink is the name of the compnay that makes the front plane display, rather than some general term for the technology.
  • The reason why it won't take off is because there isn't an easy way of getting to a vast dump of intellectual property to start the wheels going.

    If every textbook in the world would be available, then only maybe it would sell (unless it would be very, very cheap.. like $10-20.

    If every textbook in the world, as well as every picture book would be abailable, then there's a small chance people would be interested as both porn and manga would open up for these devices (and the price would have to be lower than

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