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Dropbox Files To Go Public 41

Ten years after its launch, Dropbox has filed to go public. The cloud storage company has been around since 2007 and has raised more than $600 million in funding. TechCrunch reports: We knew that it had already filed confidentially, but the company has now unveiled its filing, meaning the actual IPO is likely very soon, probably late March. The company says it will be targeting a $500 million fundraise, but this number is usually just a placeholder. The filing shows that Dropbox had $1.1 billion in revenue last year. This compares to $845 million in revenue the year before and $604 million for 2015. The company is not yet profitable, having lost nearly $112 million last year. This shows significantly improved margins when compared to losses of $210 million for 2016 and $326 million for 2015. Dropbox has been cash flow positive since 2016.
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Dropbox Files To Go Public

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  • Well shit. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by slacktide ( 796664 ) on Friday February 23, 2018 @09:10PM (#56179555)
    Saw the headline and thought they were making everyone's private Dropbox files public. Nice jerb editors.
    • by az-saguaro ( 1231754 ) on Friday February 23, 2018 @09:48PM (#56179699)

      Exactly, just what I thought. I expected an expose on the latest breach of or rogue behavior by an internet company, but instead it is about "Dropbox filing will take company public". Words and grammar make a difference. Btw, nice title.

    • "Dropbox Files for IPO" would've been a much clearer headline, but the editors wanted to avoid using fancy terms like IPO that children or people with sub-90 IQ wouldn't recognize.

      • fancy terms like IPO that children or people with sub-90 IQ wouldn't recognize.
        Or non native english speakers with IQ around 150?

    • by sims 2 ( 994794 )

      Here I thought they were bringing the public folder back.

    • Even for me, as a non native english speaker, the headline was pretty clear.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Seriously, that's gotta be one of the most ill-advised headlines I've seen on this site, or anywhere else. Is proofreading no longer a thing?

    • Doesn't help that Slashdot is still using the antiquated and pointless tradition of capitalising every word in a headline (except for the ones they don't, sometimes, seemingly at random).

      • There is nothing antiquated about it. Just nobody appreciates proper typography anymore and don't know any better. Some things are refined over centuries with careful, gradual tweaks. They will not be erased in an instant by one ignorant generation.

        • It iis antiquated, and completely pointless. It serves no purpose, and only ever makes headlines more ambiguous.

          Just nobody appreciates proper typography anymore and don't know any better.

          People do know better, and what's better is simply to capitalise a headline the same way you would capitalise any other text.

  • title (Score:2, Redundant)

    by Dthief ( 1700318 )
    misleading.....thought they were making all files public
  • by Anonymous Coward

    They randomly do stupid shit like this: suddenly making all your files public.
    How can anyone use these services.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    How can that's "cash flow positive" be losing money?

    • by AvitarX ( 172628 )

      If you take out loans quicker than your payments, that's positive cash flow without making money.

      Selling old assets for exactly what they're worth (what you paid minus depreciation) is cash flow positive and not profitable.

      Selling shares is cash flow positive and not profitable.

      These are just off the top of my head.

      • by AvitarX ( 172628 )

        Oh, I'm stupid, the most likely answer is that they have equipment they own and it's depreciating faster than they bring in money.

        Since depreciation is not a cash event, but is a loss, they can be cash flow positive while losing money.

        In theory this will mean they won't have enough money to pay replace the equipment when it is totally dead.

  • So how's their business model going to change to screw up the service with a profit ethos going on?
  • Or best. Can't decide.

  • ...they can't figure out a way to make money. Any potentially profitable company is now bought out by private investors.

(null cookie; hope that's ok)