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Biotech Medicine Robotics Science

A Squishy Clockwork BioBot Releases Doses of Drugs Inside the Body (ieee.org) 15

the_newsbeagle writes: Making micro-machines that work inside the body is tricky, because hard silicon and metal devices can cause problems. So bioengineers are working on soft and squishy gadgets that can be implanted and do useful work. Here's a soft biobot that's modeled on a Swiss watch mechanism called a Geneva drive. With every tick forward, the tiny gizmo releases a dose of drugs. Getting the material properties just right was a challenge. "If your material is collapsing like jello, it's hard to make robots out of it," says inventor Samuel Sia.
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A Squishy Clockwork BioBot Releases Doses of Drugs Inside the Body

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    You couldn't try a little harder for more alliterations?
    Maybe...

    Mushy Mechanical Biobot Brings Doses of Drugs Inside the Individual

  • with each automated unobtrusive advance we get ability to hand over more of our bodies to automata and others.

    hopefully such handovers will remain our choice.

    some of us, even in other things, prefer to be in control and knowledgeable as much as possible, even if that makes demands on our time and other resources. for instance, that is why some like open source software and unix philosophy. others prefer (allegedly) easy to use proprietary stuff which cover up the actual workings and prevent repairing among

    • It'll be the choice of our squishy clockwork overlords.
    • On the plus side, those of us who are missing certain key internal organs (spleen, gall bladder, and pancreas, in my case) would be delighted to have an artificial organ or three to replace the pills and/or injections we have to take multiple times a day just to stay alive....
      • Use only Stallman-approved FOSS organs. They may crash a lot and be missing some features and not have any drivers to interface with your other organs, but you'll spend the rest of your life feeling ethical.

    • we are getting to a similar choice about our bodies.

      Wake me up when I have an implanted sensor package that lets me make intelligent, informed decisions. Without knowing what's going on in there, we're not in control or knowledgeable.

    • with each automated unobtrusive advance we get ability to hand over more of our bodies to automata and others.

      hopefully such handovers will remain our choice.

      some of us, even in other things, prefer to be in control and knowledgeable as much as possible, even if that makes demands on our time and other resources. for instance, that is why some like open source software and unix philosophy. others prefer (allegedly) easy to use proprietary stuff which cover up the actual workings and prevent repairing among other things.

      we are getting to a similar choice about our bodies.

      I believe you've got a false dichotomy there on the operating systems. Honestly, I believe most people would prefer open and easy to use. That combination just isn't available yet.

  • That's the name of my acid ska band...

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