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Sony Hardware IT Your Rights Online

Sony Accused of Censoring Negative Feedback On Its Bravia TVs Ahead of Black Fri (ibtimes.co.uk) 40

An anonymous reader writes: Disgruntled owners of Sony's Bravia televisions have accused the company of "censoring" its community forums by preventing users from reporting technical issues. Several users say the company has locked threads containing complaints about its 4K televisions to suppress negative feedback in the run-up to the high-spending season. One of the threads removed by Sony contained 90 pages-worth of reports of input lag issues affecting its 2016 line of ultra-high definition (UHD) Bravia sets. The thread is titled, "Buyers beware, it looks almost the entire 4K 'HDR capable' TV line up from Sony are trash for 4K and HDR gaming" and clicking on the link now brings up an empty page with the error message: "the topic you are trying to access is not available."
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Sony Accused of Censoring Negative Feedback On Its Bravia TVs Ahead of Black Fri

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday November 23, 2016 @02:22PM (#53348955)

    the comment you are trying to access is not available.

  • by slazzy ( 864185 ) on Wednesday November 23, 2016 @02:27PM (#53348997) Homepage Journal
    the comment you are trying to access is not available.
  • by NaCh0 ( 6124 )

    If you buy sony, you are part of the problem.

    Their stuff never works as well as expected unless you go way up into the pro series. Even then, it's a dirty feeling to give them any money and should be avoided.

    • Just like any other electronics company, they have winners and they have losers. It all just depends on the product team and other factors.

      I used to have an RCA boombox that was a thing of engineering beauty. It sounded great, it looked great, it was powerful and had high end features. After such a great experience I bought a few more RCA products and realized pretty much everything else they made was crap. That boombox was a flash in the pan winner for that company.

      I am sure it is the same for Sony.

      My dad

      • by LocalH ( 28506 )

        RCA was once a stalwart. They were influential in the development of radio technology as used in the US, and they were the first in the US with NTSC color televisions. Now they've been reduced to a budget brand. Sad, really.

      • Just like any other electronics company, they have winners and they have losers. It all just depends on the product team and other factors.

        That misses the point. All companies have hits and misses, but brushing problems under the digital rug is reprehensible, especially when it can factor into a consumer's decision to spend $2,000.

        If you even found the thread it means you were searching for things like "sony bravia gaming" or "sony bravia gaming lag" etc. Consumers that don't care about response times would never see it. For the (probably small) subset of consumers that do care, they've hidden pertinent information that would have factored int

  • Almost all PC LCD monitors I've used, even going back to the Dell 1701FP from the early 2000s, has had minimal input lag (usually attributed to LCD response time). Why is it that so many LCD and OLED HDTVs have ridiculous amounts (60ms+) of input lag? OLED in particular doesn't even have the LCD response time excuse.

    Do the manufacturers think people *like* input lag and intentionally increase it on products marketed as TVs or something?
    • by slazzy ( 864185 )
      Maybe so people will upgrade to a "pro" model they add some lag?
    • by darkain ( 749283 ) on Wednesday November 23, 2016 @02:37PM (#53349097) Homepage

      The primary reason has to deal with all the image processing bullshit that the displays have. On some models, disabling the display manipulation and filtering bullshit will get rid of the input lag, on others it wont.

    • by xlsior ( 524145 )
      Do the manufacturers think people *like* input lag and intentionally increase it on products marketed as TVs or something?

      It's post-processing like resolution upscaling / image interpolation / temporal smoothing / etc. that all add overhead and may need several video frames of data to cross-reference, leading to lag. When you're watching a static stream of video (e.g. TV or a movie) that delay is irrelevant, but it can kill real-time applications like video games.

      On many displays those 'enhancements'
    • Do the manufacturers think people *like* input lag and intentionally increase it on products marketed as TVs or something?

      Image processing. HDR. Upscaling. Etc. Most high-ish end modern TVs will have a "gaming mode" that turns this off. I'm too lazy to understand the actual problem w/ Sony.

      • Most high-ish end modern TVs will have a "gaming mode" that turns this off.

        There is usually still some lag in game mode, but on my Samsung, for example, it goes from approx 100ms to approx 40ms when you switch.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    This does not surprise me at all considering Sony's past history of rootkits, removing features of devices with "updates", trying to control what customers could do with their purchased products, and generally screwing their customers in pretty much any way possible! I have boycotted Sony products including blu-ray for years, and this just makes me glad that I have!!

  • Maybe they were just playing old music CDs on some of their computers? Ya'know, the old Sony CDs that contained them rootkits...

  • There is a whole Internet that Sony does not have control over.... and it is even indexed by several companies also not controlled by Sony! Win!

  • by bad_fx ( 493443 ) on Wednesday November 23, 2016 @04:13PM (#53349857) Journal

    It should read: "Sony learns about Streisand effect the hard way" ;-)

  • Sony's business model appears to be built on a foundation of a deep and and abiding hatred of their customers. In my personal opinion, any Sony product connected to the internet is a security risk, especially if it phones home.
  • their house their rules.
    If you want good feedback, look at the reviews on several different websites. Amazon, Newegg, whatever. community sites? Maybe some of the folks at videohelp can point you in the right direction--it's not about TVs, but I'm thinking some of them might know what a TV is.

    Too much trouble?
    Seriously--how long did it take you to earn the cost of that toy? Maybe spend 1% as much time researching how you're going to blow your money?

    Still no guarantee but what do you expect when you go t

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