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Humble Bundle Announces 'Hacker' Pay-What-You-Want Sale (humblebundle.com) 52

An anonymous reader writes: Humble Bundle announced a special "pay what you want" sale for four ebooks from No Starch Press, with proceeds going to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (or to the charity of your choice). This "hacker edition" sale includes two relatively new titles from 2015 -- "Automate the Boring Stuff with Python" and Violet Blue's "Smart Girl's Guide to Privacy," as well as "Hacking the Xbox: An Introduction to Reverse Engineering" by Andrew "bunnie" Huang, and "The Linux Command Line".

Hackers who are willing to pay "more than the average" -- currently $14.87 -- can also unlock a set of five more books, which includes "The Maker's Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse: Defend Your Base with Simple Circuits, Arduino, and Raspberry Pi". (This level also includes "Bitcoin for the Befuddled" and "Designing BSD Rootkits: An Introduction to Kernel Hacking".) And at the $15 level -- just 13 cents more -- four additional books are unlocked. "Practical Malware Analysis: The Hands-On Guide to Dissecting Malicious Software" is available at this level, as well as "Hacking: The Art of Exploitation" and "Black Hat Python."

Nice to see they've already sold 28,506 bundles, which are DRM-free and available in PDF, EPUB, and MOBI format. (I still remember Slashdot's 2012 interview with Make magazine's Andrew "bunnie" Huang, who Samzenpus described as "one of the most famous hardware and software hackers in the world.")
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Humble Bundle Announces 'Hacker' Pay-What-You-Want Sale

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    ""The Maker's Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse: Defend Your Base with Simple Circuits, Arduino, and Raspberry Pi"."

    Step 1: Try to use this book to fight zombies using mass produced consumer electronics starter kits
    Step 2: Run screaming as the zombies overwhelm your position
    Step 3: Find a real engineer
    Step 4: Die to a zombie, unmourned for your uselessness and narcissism.

    • That one sounds good, but then they bundled a bunch of black-hat crap that is going to get people on the no-fly-list along with freakin' maker books. Because, "hackers," I guess. Fucking clueless, and not even harmlessly clueless.

      Andrew Huang's book is probably good. Too bad they had to bundle him with that crap.

      • Boo!

      • by Anonymous Coward

        The day I get put on a no-fly list for simply purchasing a widely available book, I'll consider our freedoms completely lost. I don't want to fly to a country that would treat me that way, anyway, and I sincerely doubt any modern nation would do that. I could be proven wrong, but so be it. Not going to live my life under someone's boot.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          Insallah brother, and a good Mohammad to you

        • Your communications are all logged, because you post on slashdot, and *I* (and others here) have visited the Linux Journal website, which is flagged as a radical dissident publication.

          Being flagged as a potential radical dissident will not, alone, get you on the no-fly-list.

          But being on existing lists increases the chances that you will also get placed on other lists.

          And black hat stuff is evil and illegal shit. People doing that stuff are dangerous. Buying books on criminal subjects will not alone get you

    • Step 1: Try to use this book to fight zombies using mass produced consumer electronics starter kits

      Actually it's a shame they described the book that way, as that's not all that it contains. It also has details on how to scavenge useful parts out of existing devices (car alternator, disposable camera capacitors, etc.) It's not just Pi and Arduino stuff.

      • Actually it's a shame they described the book that way,

        Actually, it's a shame that when you order from them they demand an email address that they tell you they will use to "Notify me about upcoming promotions", but not that this is the only way they will tell you how to get the books you just bought. It's only after you pay the money that they tell you about some "download link" that you are supposed to get, apparently by email, since there is no download link that appears after purchase.

        A nifty way to gather validated email addresses for future marketing, th

    • by gweihir ( 88907 )

      While there is a lot of truth in that, occasionally (say 1 in 100 cases) people actually get started on real engineering this way. You can recognize them by them eventually developing a strong disdain for these toys that essentially cater to the stupid. While Arduino hardware has some merit, in particular if you have a clue what you are doing and can read a data-sheet (quite unlike the typical "maker"), the Raspberry Pi is an unmitigated disaster, with not a single competent engineer involved in the design

      • You can recognize them by them eventually developing a strong disdain for these toys that essentially cater to the stupid.

        Yeah well, snobs abound. Nothing that can be done about that.

        While Arduino hardware has some merit

        Arduino hardware has plenty of merit. It's a like a cheaper, more widely available, standardised pinout version of vendor's devkits. Useful little devices.

        the Raspberry Pi is an unmitigated disaster,

        Except, no it isn't. For what it's for, it does the job well. I have one and it runs OctoPi t

        • I have a box full AVRs, and no Arduinos. I do things the way the snobs want. But they're mostly full of shit; this way is better for me, and perhaps better for engineers, but that doesn't tell me about what is good for other people. And I sure as heck am not going to pay $50, or $250, for a dev kit. If I was worried about providing the correct amount of power or whatever, or wanted a pre-installed bootloader, arduino would be a good starting place. You can use normal non-arduino AVR code on them, anyways.

          Bu

          • I have a box full AVRs, and no Arduinos.

            The raw chips? Or other dev kits.

            I do things the way the snobs want. But they're mostly full of shit; this way is better for me, and perhaps better for engineers,

            Indeed. I think I do too: I tend to use g++ and a Makefile directly. I don't use the Arduino environment for a variety of reasons, some good some not. Sometimes I need more precise timing, so that rules it out. Otherwise, I'm not really a fan of IDEs, I quite like poring over microcontroller datasheets and t

            • Chips, and a couple bags of crystals. Plain C. Emacs.

              It isn't all rainbows and unicorns, I do have one 328 stuck at 32khz. Which would be great, except for a software bug in the timer; it is supposed to have a bicycle blinker controller, but it waits 3 minutes to toggle instead of 1 second. I didn't realize that without a fancy expensive programmer, I had to have the code perfect before setting the fuses for that speed.

              But it's worth an occasional bricked $3 chip to have the pleasure of working directly on

      • As somebody who mostly agrees with the sentiment, I think you're overstepping by slagging on the stuff that you don't respect.

        I'd rather use an AVR directly than use the Arduino, probably because I would have read the data sheet either way, and the Arduino C code doesn't appear to provide any benefits other than not being compatible with other AVR code.

        But the pi is only intended to be an educational toy. They weren't trying to make an engineering platform. It sucks in various ways, but they needed it to be

        • by gweihir ( 88907 )

          As to AVR, that is why I wrote Arduino "Hardware".

          My impression is just that a student that actually wants to learn more about the RPi and then finds they cannot even get a decent datasheet and in addition find that most of it does not follow good engineering practices, then that is exactly the wrong message to send. My other impression is that unreliable network and USB is not something that will make working with this thing fun at all. Sure, by now there are enough work-arounds that it is mostly reliable.

          • Kids are not usually trying to find a datasheet, and even if they're nerdy enough to have read about them in internet forums they're not going to have even the technical vocabulary to understand them. They aren't complete, they don't have glossaries; even for adults who read a lot and understand jargon from related industries they can be rather opaque at times because of the low quality of the writing. Often there are formulas with variables that are not explained anywhere on the sheet, and they're not cons

  • Half of this stuff isn't hacking. I wish the mainstream would stop co-opting the culture for its own ends. I mean automate stuff with python? A privacy guide? Fuck that.

  • I've heard this line before, that the Humble Bundle is for charity. "Proceeds go to charity X." Bullshit. They can, if that's what you choose in the checkout section, but by default only 15% of the purchase goes to charity. Many many stores will allow ask for a donation to some charity at checkout, the only extra-charitable thing about the Humble Bundle is that option to divert a greater portion of your purchase to charity if you so choose.

    I don't want to denigrate that, that's good, but the Humble Bundl
  • for the list. I went to kickass.to and paid what I wanted for the books. Even got the $15-tier books.

    • Re:Thanks (Score:5, Insightful)

      by barc0001 ( 173002 ) on Sunday May 01, 2016 @05:27AM (#52021761)

      You've got a 4 digit account, so presumably you're old enough that you're making decent money and you're still pirating books when they're being nearly given away? The authors' time and effort is really worth so little to you?

      You want to pirate them, pirate them. But don't come back and boast about it, that's just an asshole move.

  • "Designing BSD Rootkits". Seems cool stuff, but very specialized, indeed!

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