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Hardware

NVIDIA Announces New Quadro M6000 With 24GB Memory Buffer For Heavy Workloads (hothardware.com) 43

Reader MojoKid writes: Some might say there's no such thing as a one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to computing, and that's especially true for workstation graphics professionals who need varying levels of performance and memory space. For that reason, NVIDIA is now offering a version of its Quadro M6000 graphics card with 24GB of GDDR5 memory, twice as much memory as much as the original model. According to NVIDIA, customers rendering datasets larger than 12GB can experience up to 5X faster performance compared to the previous Quadro M6000. Like the 12GB version, the new 24GB Quadro M6000 is based on NVIDIA's Maxwell architecture. It has 3,072 CUDA cores, a 384-bit memory bus, four DisplayPort 1.2 connectors, a single DVI-I connectors, and a maximum power consumption rating of 250W. In addition to the doubling the memory buffer, NVIDIA added a few other features, including more GPU clock options, greater software temperature control to keep the GPU temp below the point where throttling occurs, and a new under-power boot message if the card is ever under powered.
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NVIDIA Announces New Quadro M6000 With 24GB Memory Buffer For Heavy Workloads

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  • Holy crap ... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by gstoddart ( 321705 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @01:49PM (#51762565) Homepage

    I remember being all excited to have a video card with 1MB of RAM which would do 1024x768.

    My desktop has 16GB of RAM.

    What kind of porn are you guys watching you need a 24GB video card?

    • Re:Holy crap ... (Score:5, Informative)

      by simcop2387 ( 703011 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @02:10PM (#51762807) Homepage Journal

      Volumetrically modeled porn. Also we're watching neural networks excite each other.

      • As much as I understand it's not literally all porn in the sense of boobies ... volumetrically modeled porn and neural network porn is no different from food porn and automobile porn.

        It's all porn of some kind for someone, even it allegedly not porn. ;-)

    • I think VR porn will need that. Self-aware VR porn will need much more. On a more practical note when this amount of video memory is common it will be possible to buffer games far enough into the distance and with good enough textures to reach retinal quality. Video will finally be literally indistinguishable from real life.
    • by Hentes ( 2461350 )

      Quadros are professional grade cards for content creators, not consumers.

    • I'm less interested in the porn than I am the quality of the shadows behind the porn. For that, you need a really good graphics card.
    • Thats advanced. I remember having a ZX81 with 1KB of RAM with part of that being screen memory
  • Quite the CUDA card, this one..

    Until there's HBM, with its ultra-wide memory busses, this thing seems a likely choice for mem-buffer intensive crunching.

    • What surprises me(especially since AMD is clearly capable of it, since the PS4 does it, and it'd be a bit of a shock if Nvidia and Intel were incapable of following suit or already have something ready to go) is that CUDA(or OpenCL)-targeted systems still haven't made any moves(at least not commercially visible ones) toward unified memory architecture; and/or allowing the relatively expansive supply of motherboard memory expansion to use GDDR and connecting the GPU via a faster interface than PCIe if neede
      • What surprises me(especially since AMD is clearly capable of it, since the PS4 does it, and it'd be a bit of a shock if Nvidia and Intel were incapable of following suit or already have something ready to go) is that CUDA(or OpenCL)-targeted systems still haven't made any moves(at least not commercially visible ones) toward unified memory architecture;

        CUDA has had all kinds of unified memory support since version 6, so for at least two years now, I reckon. Have a look at cudaMallocManaged(). The stack memory is "unified" as well now, as is the system allocator (since the GM2xx series).

        • I realize that the GPU can access main memory(the cheap and lousy ones have been doing it to save money for ages; and Nvidia has made the process a bit nicer for their compute users when they need access to lots of RAM); but the memory is 'non-unified' in the sense that a GPU accessing system RAM is (relatively speaking, it's still pretty fast in absolute terms) a second class citizen compared to a CPU accessing system RAM(there is an unavoidable increase in latency if the RAM is connected to a different CP
        • CUDA has had all kinds of unified memory support since version 6,

          Sounds very dubious to me given the fact that to my knowledge, AMD is the only company that (in its most recent APUs) actually put its GPU on top of the CPU's memory access infrastructure, including the virtual address space. The GPU then accesses any relevant data immediately without copying, and any relevant drivers or infrastructure can be put into user space since the GPU doesn't access physical memory but is subject to memory protection in exactly the same way that multiple threads belonging to the sam

      • Re:CUDA (Score:4, Interesting)

        by SoftwareArtist ( 1472499 ) on Wednesday March 23, 2016 @03:40PM (#51763635)

        NVIDIA is in fact working on something like that. It's called NVLink [nvidia.com] and will, according to that page, enable "data sharing at rates 5 to 12 times faster than the traditional PCIe Gen3 interconnect". There's no commercial hardware yet that supports it, but it should be coming soon.

  • As someone deferring a hardware upgrade until the shiny new Nvidia GPUs come out with a step change in performance/watt should I worry that they're still issuing new 'top end' versions of the current generation?

  • Look, I know it's been almost ten years now, but just checking - are we still waiting for a card that can run Crysis?

  • Too bad the software that would take advantage of this has been shifting away from the benefits that the Quadro brand typically offers and towards more game-engine like approaches that make gaming cards more cost-effective.

  • MojoKid is HotHardware.com's editor in chief: Is this acceptable? There is no acknowledgement of his involvement in the site in question. It smacks of some sort of nonsense.

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