Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Open Source Software Hardware Linux News Technology

Odroid C2 Challenges Raspberry Pi 3 On Hardware But Not Ecosystem (hackaday.com) 78

szczys writes: We are surely in the age of single-board computers as the words "Raspberry Pi" sneak into the ranks of [a] household name. Many would have thought this impossible, but for hardware enthusiasts it has wide-reaching benefits as others clamor to enter the market. The most formidable challenge made so far is by the Hardkernel Odroid C2 which bests the Pi 3 on hardware, but not everything. Odroid C2 has the same cores, running faster with more RAM. It swaps out gigabit Ethernet for the Pi 3's somewhat unimpressive Wi-Fi chip. And it includes onboard eMMC (useful for faster booting) as well as an SD card slot. Odroid C2's hardware is clearly a better offering than Pi 3 for just $5 more (as we saw from the benchmarks last week), but that's not the entire story. It's further down Linux stream for a less mature distro, and has nowhere near the community support that has opened the Pi [up] to just about everyone. But it is the hardware geek's SBC with the layman's price tag and that's a very interesting indicator of where we are with low-cost computing.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Odroid C2 Challenges Raspberry Pi 3 On Hardware But Not Ecosystem

Comments Filter:
  • The PC has superior hardware at a higher cost and... eh... oh wait.

    Never mind.

    (posted from Macmini4,1)

  • dmbasso@raspi ~ $ uptime
    20:03:06 up 399 days, 20:50, 1 user, load average: 0.03, 0.07, 0.06

    Booting speed is not an issue to me. :)

  • by spire3661 ( 1038968 ) on Wednesday March 16, 2016 @03:17PM (#51710533) Journal
    Even disregarding the community aspect, Odroid runs a weirdo/old software stack. If it was running something more akin to Raspbian which is pretty close to mainline Debian, i would be more interested in it. I dont even like using Adafruit's custom raspbian images they provide with their ~3" TFT screens.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Andy Dodd ( 701 )

      Not sure why you got marked as flamebait here.

      For Insignal and Hardkernel's Exynos-based Android projects, their poor software support (vastly outdated software baselines - no excuse for development reference boards to have older software than carrier-approved Android handset releases for the same SoC, software baselines which were vasty different from any shipped product containing SoC, and Hardkernel's distribution of their Android source as a 2GB megatarball with no commit history - I hear they might hav

    • Even disregarding the community aspect, Odroid runs a weirdo/old software stack.

      Ubuntu 16.04 is "weirdo/old"?

      The reason I'd avoid it is because I' m trying to use one of their XU4s to run a GigE camera, and under Ubuntu 15.4 it appears to have issues handling jumbo frames. That's a bit better than what happens using the official Hardkernel Ubuntu 15.10 -- the GigE controller (connected through the USB, as is done on the Pi) disconnects about ten seconds after being initialized. I.e., it simply disappears. And I can't get an answer from Hardkernel about any fixes they plan for this.

      I

      • by Trongy ( 64652 )

        Even disregarding the community aspect, Odroid runs a weirdo/old software stack.

        Ubuntu 16.04 is "weirdo/old"?

        You are talking about the top of the software stack. He was talking about the bottom of the software stack - the firmware/binary blobs and the non-mainstream kernel drivers that you need to run on the odroid.

        The reason I'd avoid it is because I' m trying to use one of their XU4s to run a GigE camera, and under Ubuntu 15.4 it appears to have issues handling jumbo frames ...

        Like he said - "weird/old software stack". It sounds like Hardkernel are doing hacks in the kernel source to get things partly working, but contributing them back to the mainline kernel (which is where QA happens in the linux world).

    • The draw of Odroid is running android. It works pretty well on their hardware. It's still a "weirdo" stack but it's hands down bang for buck for running android. If you want Linux then yeah, raspberry pi is probably what you want.
    • I had an odroid C1. Though it has nice specs, the software is incredibly flaky. I would routinely get software updates from hard kernel that would corrupt the boot loader, disable networking, etc. There was a period where they shipped a wifi driver for their *own* branded wifi adapter that could not reliably connect to name brand access points if there were more than a few visible to the device. When I complained that hard kernel was routinely hosing my productivity for pushing untested software into it
  • How is swapping out wifi with no add-on board (PI 3) for a wired interface an improvement?? For $5 extra?

    Pi 3 is targeting stuff that is useful. Built in wifi, relatively modern linux base etc.

    And if its not good enough wait 6 months for the next version.

     

    • by fnj ( 64210 )

      How is swapping out wifi with no add-on board (PI 3) for a wired interface an improvement?? For $5 extra?

      The Odroid is GIGABIT ethernet, sparky. The Pi isn't even really a fully capable 100 Mb. It is hanging off the same terrible chip that implements the USBs. At least that's the promise of the Odroid. The Odroid hardware QC is so shaky, however, I've avoided trying it so far.

      • by amiga3D ( 567632 )

        Considering the power of the hardware I don't see much of a bottle neck with the Pi. Gig ethernet would probably not be that noticeable on that platform. Speed isn't really it's thing. It's just fast enough. Just.

        • by aXis100 ( 690904 )

          I have the slightly older Odroid C1, which competes against the PI2. Gigabit is definitely noticeable, and it quite happily saturates the Gigabit link well before saturating the CPU. It performs well enough that I can use the Odroid as low cost, low power file server.

        • Considering the power of the hardware I don't see much of a bottle neck with the Pi.

          I can get over 20 MB/sec to a USB3 GoFlex on a Pogoplug Series 4... near its locally-connected speed. That's got just one core at an even lower clock rate.

      • The Odroid hardware QC is so shaky, however, I've avoided trying it so far.

        Last I checked they were offering a whopping 30 days warranty on these SBCs. That's not a sign of confidence in the product.

  • by millette ( 56354 ) <robin@@@millette...info> on Wednesday March 16, 2016 @03:32PM (#51710641) Homepage Journal

    Actual link to the Odroid C2 vs Raspberri Pi 3 comparison:
    http://www.phoronix.com/scan.p... [phoronix.com]

  • RPi is a video capture/processing chip (Broadcom VideoCore) with an ARM co-processor. Compresses, manipulates, and streams Full HD input video in real-time.

    ODroid has no video input at all (the product page suggests getting a USB camera which performs its own compression, because the ODroid could never keep up)

    Ok, probably most users care more about the general-purpose ARM cores and Linux than the VideoCore, but it's just wrong to say that ODroid "has the same cores but faster", when the biggest portion of

    • Ok, probably most users care more about the general-purpose ARM cores and Linux than the VideoCore, but it's just wrong to say that ODroid "has the same cores but faster", when the biggest portion of BCM2837, the VideoCore, is completely absent from the ODroid.

      Interesting to know, as I am one of said users, and as a this actually makes me more likely to consider an ODroid C2.

      • by amiga3D ( 567632 )

        I think they both have their own audience. At this price point you'll never make everyone happy with one board.

    • RPi is a video capture/processing chip (Broadcom VideoCore) with an ARM co-processor. Compresses, manipulates, and streams Full HD input video in real-time.

      ODroid has no video input at all (the product page suggests getting a USB camera which performs its own compression, because the ODroid could never keep up)

      Ok, probably most users care more about the general-purpose ARM cores and Linux than the VideoCore, but it's just wrong to say that ODroid "has the same cores but faster", when the biggest portion of BCM2837, the VideoCore, is completely absent from the ODroid.

      Incorrect. The Odroid-C2 uses the Amlogic S905 SoC which does have a built-in encoding/decoding block. It supports much higher resolutions and framerates than RPi, including formats the RPi's Videocore IV doesn't support at all; Videocore IV doesn't support e.g. HEVC, let alone 10-bit HEVC, whereas the S905 does do both.

    • by vovin ( 12759 )

      RPi is a video capture/processing chip (Broadcom VideoCore) with an ARM co-processor. Compresses, manipulates, and streams Full HD input video in real-time.

      As opposed to 4K video at 60 fps on the ODroid? Depending on how to slice that up you should be able to transcode 2 or 4 Full HD streams at 30 fps at the same time.

      ODroid has no video input at all (the product page suggests getting a USB camera which performs its own compression, because the ODroid could never keep up)

      This has to do with bandwidth on USB. Doing 4k screen grabs over USB at 30 or 60 FPS ain't gonna happen. Unless you have a dedicated path to offload the data to the VPU you can't even feed it fast enough to do anything remotely useful.

      Ok, probably most users care more about the general-purpose ARM cores and Linux than the VideoCore, but it's just wrong to say that ODroid "has the same cores but faster", when the biggest portion of BCM2837, the VideoCore, is completely absent from the ODroid.

      Hardware wise the ODroid is a bargain.
      Fitness for use is up to each application.
      Software support ... to be hone

      • As opposed to 4K video at 60 fps on the ODroid? Depending on how to slice that up you should be able to transcode 2 or 4 Full HD streams at 30 fps at the same time.

        You're mixing up encoding and decoding. The S905 can't encode at 4K @ 60FPS, it only does 1080p @ 60 FPS encoding.

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )
      Win some lose some. That chip is a bit of a bottleneck for other things (USB, ethernet) and is the reason the Pi has a 1GB memory ceiling - so if you care about the video it's wonderful and if you don't care it's worth using something else if you want to use it for something that hits limits.
  • What the fuck is this about?
  • by wisnoskij ( 1206448 ) on Wednesday March 16, 2016 @04:01PM (#51710861) Homepage

    Higher Specs look good on paper, but are not nearly as important as stability and well written software. I have the original version that looked amazing next to the pi 2. But it crashes all the time and the only video player that works on it is Kodi.

  • It seems to me that the barriers to entering the "community" are pretty low. As a baby step the ODroid could have put the connectors and mounting holes in the same place as an Rpi, that would at least have made it possible to use some of the mechanical accessories, like enclosures and maybe even some of the more exotic accessories like GPIO breakout cables.

    I don't see any other small form factors getting much traction, it's not as if there are lots of vendors making mobile-itx form factor boards and enclosu

  • I did a simple apt-get dist-upgrade and bricked the stupid thing.
    • by Kazymyr ( 190114 )

      I did an apt-get dist-upgrade and did not brick the stupid thing.

      Also, "brick" means that you can't recover it unless you use complicated procedures like unsoldering/soldering chips, flashing through JTAG etc. How is pulling out the SD card and reimaging it akin to "bricking"?

  • As I posted previously:

    I own a Odroid C1+ I intended to use as a mini network television appliance - basically a home-brew Tablo. I had convinced myself that since it ran a recent-looking version of Ubuntu, and that version supported my USB tuner stick, I was good to go.

    In fact, the OS for the C1+ is a weird hybrid of a very old kernel (3.10 IIRC) and somewhat newer, but still oldish, user-space code. For those new to this, the current kernel is 4.4.4, and 3.10 was released in June 2013. This kernel dates f

"The medium is the massage." -- Crazy Nigel

Working...