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Education Hardware Hacking Upgrades Wireless Networking Hardware

Raspberry Pi 3 Rolls Out With Faster CPU, On-Board Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth 203

An anonymous reader writes: The original Raspberry Pi went on sale four years ago, and more than 8,000,000 units have shipped since then. Raspberry Pi computers are used in schools and universities, in factories and other industrial applications, in home automation and hobby projects, and much more. Today the Raspberry Pi 3 was announced, featuring a 64-bit quad-core ARMv8 CPU clocked at 1.2GHz, making it roughly 10x the speed of the original Pi 1. Many people will be pleased to hear that the Raspberry Pi 3 also features on-board Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, greatly improving the device's connectivity. The new device goes on sale today at the usual price of US $35. (Here's the official announcement itself.)
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Raspberry Pi 3 Rolls Out With Faster CPU, On-Board Wi-Fi, and Bluetooth

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  • by jason777 ( 557591 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:38AM (#51607913)
    The price is right. Its game over now to get literally anything online. I'm building an interface for my garage doors. Also, I still cant get my hands on a pi zero.
    • Re:Awesome (Score:4, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:44AM (#51607933)

      Also, I still cant get my hands on a pi zero.

      Try Coke Zero. Available at any grocery store.

    • Re:Awesome (Score:5, Informative)

      by silas_moeckel ( 234313 ) <{silas} {at} {dsminc-corp.com}> on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:47AM (#51607957) Homepage

      Try an ESP 8266 for interfacing a garage door you need what a few inputs and a handful of outputs?

      • Re:Awesome (Score:5, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:52AM (#51607987)

        comma (noun)
        1. a punctuation mark (,) indicating a pause between parts of a sentence or separating items in a list.

      • Re:Awesome (Score:4, Interesting)

        by LWATCDR ( 28044 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @11:27AM (#51608233) Homepage Journal

        For a basic door opener yes but maybe they want it to include a BLE interface to the cell phone or even using the camera and Open CV to have it identify the car and automatically close the door.
        It really depends on the feature set you want but the ESP 8266 could do a simple open the door when you use an app on your smartphone.

      • Re:Awesome (Score:4, Informative)

        by spire3661 ( 1038968 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @12:08PM (#51608531) Journal
        If you are going the ESP8266 route, go to Adafruit, they have it mounted on some interesting breakout boards that make life easy.
        • I'm looking for something like the pi, basically a fully populated board requiring power supply, but with a real ethernet subsystem (not a USB-hub mediated mechanism) and a SATA (III, II, I in that order of preference) interface. I've seen multiple failures with the little memory cards, and would like to use actual drives instead from boot on up - without USB or memory cards being involved.

          Faster, more cores, and more RAM is better, and price anywhere up to $100 would be fine. I do need the HDMI, USB for ke

      • Looks like that only has 1 gpio. I need a io to activate the garage door switch, and then another to hook some kind of sensor to check the door state. Then times 2, because there are 2 doors. Then, i want to build a web interface to it. And I need wifi because the garage is separate. I think a PI zero would fit the bill nicely.
        • Re:Awesome (Score:5, Insightful)

          by Gaygirlie ( 1657131 ) <gaygirlie.hotmail@com> on Monday February 29, 2016 @12:45PM (#51608783) Homepage

          No, where did you read that the ESP8266 only has 1 GPIO? That's totally incorrect, it has 11 GPIO and you can have 2 more if you get one of the modules where two of the pins going to the flash - chip are cut or you cut them yourself for a total of 13 GPIO - pins. There is also one analog input pin. Also, you can run a web-interface on them, if you want to.

          I have several ESP8266's myself and they are fabulous little devices and perfect for uses like this because they are so small, they use very little power and the built-in WiFi means you don't need any dongles or anything like that to make network-connected sensors and controllers. I have a small 2.8" colour LCD with touchscreen connected to an ESP with temperature/humidity - sensor, a PIR motion - sensor and a few more sensors in my use, and it works great.

        • There are a lot of breakouts for the chip, Something like an adafruit hazzah gets you 9 gpio's, flexible power input (though not like a usb wall wart is hard). As to positioning standard security system magnetic reeds for garage doors work well.

          If you have a chamberlain or any of the the other brand names that uses the same kit the myq gateway gets you all that and integrates well with full home automation bits has a stand alone phone app as well. For me that coupled with openhab got me what I wanted.

        • by c ( 8461 )

          Looks like that only has 1 gpio.

          The ESP-01 board does. It's mostly intended as a wireless extension board for devices which talk serial protocols so GPIO's aren't really a big deal.

          The ESP-12, on the other hand, has a whole lot more. I think the ESP-201 has a few extras.

        • Look at the NodeMCU boards - basically an ESP8266 with the I/o broken out, and all the bits and pieces you need to program one up.

          They have more than one I/O (you might be thinking of the real cheap version of the ESP8266 that is billed as a serial Wi-Fi adapter). You can pickup a NodeMCU board for under $10, and if you are really smart buy a copy of Neil Kolban's eBook on the ESP8266 - includes helpful hints on getting it up and running with the Arduino IDE.

          Much cheaper than getting a Pi Zero and the

      • Will it to https or some other secure type of encryption over the Internet? I mean we all been talking about how IoT stuff is insecure.

        • Depending on the firmware used it will do SSL/TLS. Would suggest never having something like this accessable from the internet directly.

      • The ESP 8266 is a great low cost choice, but if you want to implement SSL and other strong security measures I think the new Pi would be a better choice.
        • It will do ssl just fine. I'll take an embedded micro over a rpi running linux for security for the simple fact that it's running one bit of firmware not a multitasking OS. Mind you would not connect it to the internet either.

    • Re:Awesome (Score:5, Funny)

      by Thanshin ( 1188877 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:48AM (#51607967)

      Also, I still cant get my hands on a pi zero.

      Check your retailer. You can get a zero for every two PI.

      R.

    • Actually I have found better boards for around $22 that have dual-ethernet and a better networking architecture that are better for "online" applications. Plus you don't need 1.2Ghz for garage doors.
      • Re: Awesome (Score:5, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 29, 2016 @11:04AM (#51608087)

        Specifically the GL-inet 6416 has dual ethernet, 2.4GHz wifi, one USB socket, a MIPS processor (Atheros AR9330) with 64 megabytes of RAM and 16 megabytes of flash, and 5 easily accessible GPIOs. It's not much, but it's good cheap fun.

      • You don't need a computer at all for garage doors. And technically you don't even need electricity either, although I do admit that automatic garage door openers do make life easier.

        As an added bonus, if you have a manual garage door, you don't have weird failure modes or resetting the manual release if there is a power outage.

      • You don't need dual Ethernet for garage doors. Will your better board take less than 20 minutes extra time to program for than the raspi? Or even read watch pre purchase? Unless your time has no value the cost is not an issue. But if in 2 years there's no support for the drivers or other software you use your better board isn't. Yet you'll almost certainly be able to port anything from your raspi 3 to the new raspi 5.

    • by hawguy ( 1600213 )

      The price is right. Its game over now to get literally anything online. I'm building an interface for my garage doors. Also, I still cant get my hands on a pi zero.

      Sparkfun has it for pre-order ($39.95) and says they'll have 1800 units for sale on March 15th. Though they don't say how many pre-orders they already have.

    • by mspohr ( 589790 )

      If you have a Chamberlain or Liftmaster garage door opener, you can buy this gateway for $37 which tells if the door is open or closed and can move the door plus other functions on Android and iPhone... probably easier than DIY (unless you like tinkering).
      http://www.amazon.com/Chamberl... [amazon.com]

  • Ethernet (Score:5, Interesting)

    by arth1 ( 260657 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:39AM (#51607915) Homepage Journal

    But still the same ethernet that goes over the USB bus?

    • Re:Ethernet (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Christian Smith ( 3497 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:50AM (#51607977) Homepage

      But still the same ethernet that goes over the USB bus?

      And? A 100Mbps ethernet interface is fine over the 480 Mbps USB2 bus. You're not going to be running an enterprise NAS on this thing now, are you?

      The original USB ethernet had problems with the poly-fuses blowing out under load. That's not a problem now with later Pis.

      • Re:Ethernet (Score:4, Informative)

        by fisted ( 2295862 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @11:03AM (#51608079)

        The original USB ethernet had problems with the poly-fuses blowing out under load. That's not a problem now with later Pis.

        Different problem. That was about the raspi resetting.

        The throughput is still shit, a theoretical maximum of 480Mbps notwithstanding.

      • by arth1 ( 260657 )

        A 100Mbps ethernet interface is fine over the 480 Mbps USB2 bus.

        Only if you don't use the CPU for anything else. The problem with the Pi as it is, is that using the CPU severely limits the network throughput and especially latency, and using the network limits the CPU.
        Using an encrypted VPN connection or doing stateful packet inspection or running https based services from a Pi is downright painful, and it isn't because the CPU is slow, but because CPU and USB competes, for everything. I'd much rather not have built-in WiFi and bluetooth, but instead get a real ethern

    • So? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by goombah99 ( 560566 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @11:55AM (#51608441)

      But still the same ethernet that goes over the USB bus?

      You complain about this like it's a show stopping defect. For the few people who care about this, then there's alternatives to rasp PI. But for the vast majority of people, empirically, this is not a problem. Given the Raspi only has a gigbyte of memory or half that, where the heck are you going to put your data after 10 seconds at a gigabit?

      Next you will complain your toaster having only 10Mb/set wifi is a major lifestyle issue.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by KingBozo ( 137671 )

        Hey when the whole family is watching the toaster from their phones to see who is first to get the eggo waffle, 10Mb/sec is just to slow. I could completely miss the eggo popping up and my kids get it first.

    • And still no moon-on-a-stick, either!

    • by G00F ( 241765 )

      I'm thinking the same. If all they had changed was USB 3 and Gig Ethernet I would be buying to replace the old. Even with it still being limited to 1 root USB port would be 10x improvement. (480MPs vs 640MBbs)

      Even better would have been Ethernet not going through the usb, more multiple usb root ports. (or the ability to add on higher speed devices like SATA/eSATA/Firewire/More USB 3.x ports )

      *sigh* Maybe there will be another revision with it, or next release . . . .

      • I'm thinking the same. If all they had changed was USB 3 and Gig Ethernet I would be buying to replace the old. Even with it still being limited to 1 root USB port would be 10x improvement. (480MPs vs 640MBbs)

        Even better would have been Ethernet not going through the usb, more multiple usb root ports. (or the ability to add on higher speed devices like SATA/eSATA/Firewire/More USB 3.x ports )

        *sigh* Maybe there will be another revision with it, or next release . . . .

        The SoC used pretty much outputs only USB, HDMI and GPIO. There is no PCIe controller built in, the memory accesses (used for CPU and GPU) go straight to memory mounted on the SoC. The SoC is just not designed for other IO options, and why should it? It's basically a set top box SoC by design, and that's pretty much how most people use it.

        Moving to another fundamentally different SoC would probably have compatibility issues.

  • in bed with satan (Score:5, Insightful)

    by nimbius ( 983462 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @10:58AM (#51608035) Homepage

    BCM43438 wireless âoecomboâ chip.

    Kill yourself. As a veteran Linux sysadmin seeing BCM in the lsmod or lspci for ANY machine is enough to make me dive out a window and head for the hills. Broadcom wireless --christ even broadcom wired -- is a whole other level of shit-tier performance in Linux. enjoy your frozen interfaces and unsupported modes.

    To the Pi team: Why god why couldnt you have chosen something like an Intel or atheros?

    • Re:in bed with satan (Score:5, Informative)

      by bigdady92 ( 635263 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @11:07AM (#51608107) Homepage
      The founder of Pi worked at Broadcom, Broadcom gave them buttloads of code and chips for next to nothing, therefore it made 100% sense to build a board that is simple and easy to use based on this type of cheap and well known tech. Broadcom is using the Pi as a springboard into other projects using the whole Razor vs. Razor Blade methodology of sales. Broadcom may be making very thin margins but they are still making some profit on the chips and boards.

      Intel already tried build a Pi type board, it doesn't have anywhere near the amount of applications the Pi does so why bother using it?
    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      To the Pi team: Why god why couldnt you have chosen something like an Intel or atheros?

      Cost, and extra work to integrate with the Broadcom SoC they use. Broadcom give you everything you need to plug their chips together for free, where as if you want to mix and match you are on your own design wide. If you look at the RPi schematic it's basically the Broadcom minimal example from the datasheet, with a voltage regulator and some ports.

    • The Raspberry Pi team were going for cheap platform that could be affordable to schools, hobby projects and used in developing nations.
      When the Raspberry Pi first rolled out the processor was about $5, that left $30 for everything else.
      At that time Intel SOC were going for $35 in bulk, which would have made the Raspberry Pi at least $65. The original Intel chips used during development would have been even more expensive.

      Other people have pointed out that the founder worked at Broadcom.

      I can't comment
    • by Improv ( 2467 )

      You make compromises when you make a device like this. The Pi is great for a lot of projects, but it won't be great for everybody. I might care about networking performance for other devices, but for my Pis (I normally tend to buy about 10-20), I won't care one bit about this unless it can't even effectively do 10 megabit.

  • Glad to hear that the RasPi Zero wasn't the only product on development from Rasp Foundation.

    I had a lot of fun with tinkering with the Raspberry Pi 2 so far and that new Raspberry Pi 3 seem to be a step in the good direction.

    More power and, finally, integrated Wifi and bluetooth. Something that seem more important and cheaper than many other hardware.

    Still, there still a lot to be desired, both hardware and software. Analog IO, more power (USB 3.0?), better Python development tool and IDE (yeah, idle or id

    • IDE?

      Even the last couple of desktop motherboards I've bought don't do IDE anymore. Strictly SATA.

      Realistically, the Pi is OK for casual computing and as a mount-anywhere smart controller/interface, but if you need serious storage, network that sucker into a SAN.

      • by Eloking ( 877834 )

        IDE?

        Even the last couple of desktop motherboards I've bought don't do IDE anymore. Strictly SATA.

        Realistically, the Pi is OK for casual computing and as a mount-anywhere smart controller/interface, but if you need serious storage, network that sucker into a SAN.

        For 21th century people, IDE mean "Integrated development environment" : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... [wikipedia.org]

        • Don't blame me. Parent shouldn't be mixing hardware whinges with software whinges in the same paragraph. The hardware is what the manufacturer made it to be. software can come from anywhere.

          For me, a software development IDE is either a specific product or plural. Lots of IDEs work just fine on the Pi. I've used IDEs on machines a lot feebler than even the most basic Raspberry Pi, especially if you include Emacs and Vim with plugins. Re-reading carefully, I'm thinking the parent complaint was about a suppos

  • With the new Raspberry Pi out, what are the benefits of going with the Raspberry Pi over the Banana Pi and vice Vesra?

  • by m.alessandrini ( 1587467 ) on Monday February 29, 2016 @11:31AM (#51608269)
    They say they are investigating if it's worth porting raspbian to 64 bits. I'd say: YES! What's the point in having a 64-bit CPU if you cannot exploit it fully?
  • http://hardware.slashdot.org/s... [slashdot.org]

    Posted last Saturday by....Timothy...Huzza!

    I've nothing against the Pi but this relentless boosting of it is getting tedious.

  • Once again demand outstrips supply.

  • I guess I will finally have to upgrade from my Palm Treo.
    • by DamonHD ( 794830 )

      Don't hurry now; some tech matures with age! B^>

      Maybe I could swap it for a Pilot I may stil have lurking...

      Running a JVM on a Pilot was a challenge, on an RPI rather less so.

      Rgds

      Damon

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