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Portables Graphics Intel Hardware

Asus ZenBook UX305CA Shows What Skylake Core M Is Capable Of (hothardware.com) 160

MojoKid writes: ASUS recently revamped their ZenBook UX305 family of ultralight notebooks with Intel's 6th generation Skylake Core m series, which brings with it not only improved graphics performance but also native support for PCI Express NVMe M.2 Solid State Drives. The platform is turning out to be fairly strong for this category of notebooks and the low cost ZenBook ($699 as tested) is a good example of what a Skylake Core M is capable of in a balanced configuration. Tested here, the machine is configured with a 256GB M.2 SSD, 8GB of RAM and a 2.2GHz Core m3-6Y30 dual-core CPU. Along with a 13.3-inch 1080p FHD display and 802.11ac wireless connectivity, the ZenBook UX305 is setup nicely and it puts up solid performance numbers in both standard compute tasks and graphics. It also offers some of the best battery life numbers in an ultralight yet, lasting over 10 hours on a charge in real world connected web testing.
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Asus ZenBook UX305CA Shows What Skylake Core M Is Capable Of

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Puff piece aside, the freezing bug they found when a MAJOR benchmark (Prime95 benchmark) is executed, suggests this hasn't been QA'd very well.

    http://vrworld.com/2016/01/15/intel-got-lucky-with-the-skylake-freezing-bug/

    At the very least ensure you have the patched version. But there may be others in it, so perhaps leave it for the early adopters to debug.

    (What I find disconcerting is that the chips microcode was updated by the BIOS and BIOS updates have been found to be downloaded un-encrypted, meaning the

  • Any VGA? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by sk999 ( 846068 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @12:17AM (#51407161)

    Just finished giving three talks in three days at three different locations / venues, where I needed to connect my laptop to the overhead projector. In every case the primary connector to the projector was VGA. Fortunately my clunky, old-fashioned, outdated laptop (actually, an old netbook) has a VGA port, so hooking up was always straightforward.

    What does Skylake have to offer?
    http://tech.slashdot.org/story... [slashdot.org]

    • Just finished giving three talks in three days at three different locations / venues, where I needed to connect my laptop to the overhead projector. In every case the primary connector to the projector was VGA.

      Don't you know VGA is dead? I read it here: http://tech.slashdot.org/story... [slashdot.org]

    • by Mal-2 ( 675116 )

      An HDMI-to-VGA dongle that goes right on the end of the cable is something like $4 on fleaBay. I bought one so I could continue using an otherwise perfectly functional Dell E173FP monitor that takes only VGA with hardware that only spits out DVI or HDMI. It splits audio from the stream as well, but I can divert it easily enough to the normal headphone output and have never used that function.

      • Re:Any VGA? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by fph il quozientatore ( 971015 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @04:56AM (#51407837) Homepage
        Ah, modern laptops. They are thinner than ever, and they do all that the old ones could, provided you pack with them a HDMI-VGA dongle, a USB-Ethernet dongle, an external CD/DVD reader and an external hard disk for storage.
        • The truth is that many of us don't need those things ever, and most of us don't need them most of the time. Also, you're way off your nut on the storage issue. Itsy bitsy SSDs have quite high capacities these days.

        • Ah, modern laptops. They are thinner than ever, and they do all that the old ones could, provided you pack with them a HDMI-VGA dongle, a USB-Ethernet dongle, an external CD/DVD reader and an external hard disk for storage.

          VGA ports are massive compared to the thickness of any modern laptop. Even before VGA was pulled, laptop manufacturers had already switched to proprietary "mini VGA" form factors, and this still was roughly as large as a full size HDMI port.

          There is no good solution to the VGA problem oth

        • You jest but this is a good outcome. If you want bulk, carry the crap everywhere, you're almost no worse off then you were in the past. In the mean time I carry what I need. Work laptop comes with me absolutely everywhere. VGA adapter and USB Ethernet do not. The VGA adapter comes with me when I present something, but I haven't used Ethernet adapters in a long time as WiFi is basically everywhere where I work and when I'm out visiting a vendor a 4G dongle is far more useful.

          By the way what's a CD/DVD reader

          • I don't see why more people aren't just opting for mini desktop like the Intel NUC machines. You can tote that back and forth to work a lot easier than a laptop. Most people I know with work laptops only use them at work and at home. They already have a monitor keyboard and mouse in both places. There's no reason to carry those things back and forth between work. Even those that travel for work would probably be better off buying a separate portable screen and keyboard to set up in the hotel room. For t

            • It sounds like you'd be better suited with a simple docking station rather than a NUC. Quite frankly if you're dragging a computer back and forward only to use a fixed screen, keyboard and mouse at either end you're doing it the hard way.

              Laptops have the benefit of being able to be powered up anywhere to access. Carry to meeting and hook to projectors if you need, then go back and dock in a docking station. If I needed a full desktop computer in multiple places it would make sense to have a full desktop and

            • Because NUC machines are almost the same price as a cheap laptop and don't even come with a screen?
            • Even those that travel for work would probably be better off buying a separate portable screen and keyboard to set up in the hotel room.

              Probably better off in meetings too. Though imagine the embarrassment when you've spent 3 or 4 minutes hooking it all* together and you realise you've forgotten the mouse.

              * NUC machine, power brick, screen, hdmi cable, screen power brick, keyboard

              • by Mal-2 ( 675116 )

                I have four monitors in front of me currently, one of which would qualify as "thin and light" and thus be good for toting around. It has only a power cord, not a power brick. A laptop won't have its power supply integrated, but a monitor just might, and it doesn't necessarily cost extra to choose one that doesn't need a brick. On the keyboard side, go for something wireless that has a trackpad built in and you're good to go. Never take the receiver out of the USB port, and there's nothing to set up. NUC, po

                • Never take the receiver out of the USB port, and there's nothing to set up. NUC, power brick, monitor, HDMI cable, power cable, wireless keyboard.

                  Ah, wireless keyboard! That's what I was missing, now it all makes sense.

        • by Mal-2 ( 675116 )

          I have an external optical drive, but I haven't used it in at least three years. It's so much easier to use SD cards and flash drives for the same functions. Faster, too. M.2 SSDs are more than adequate in storage capacity these days. If I'm going to use wired Ethernet with a machine that doesn't natively support it, then I'd most likely leave the interface at the site (work or home) where it is required, rather than hauling it around. The HDMI dongle thing is something the projector owners really should ke

    • There are a lot more HDMI laptops out there than VGA projectors. So it's really the venues which still have VGA projectors who should have HDMI to VGA adapters on hand, than to expect every laptop owner out there to buy one or buy a VGA laptop, just in case.

      The better venues use projectors configured to allow you to remote desktop/VNC into your laptop over the network (ethernet or wifi). So a lot of times you don't even need to be physically connected to the projector.
  • Let's be fair (Score:5, Interesting)

    by tyme ( 6621 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @12:23AM (#51407177) Homepage Journal

    First, it's not 2.2GHz (that's the maximum turbo frequency), it's rated speed is less than 1GHz (0.9GHz, according to TFA). The MacBooks use 1.1GHz and 1.2GHz Broadwell processors (turbo boost to 2.4GHz and 2.6GHz). The Skylake processors are probably both faster and lower power.

    Second, it's actually a pretty nice machine (assuming that you can stand Windows): anybody complaining about the new MacBook with only a single USB C port should be pretty happy with this machine, which comes with a full complement of ports. And the price is certainly pretty good (even the high resolution model is about half the price of the new MacBook).

    Third, the black finish looks really nice: I wish Apple would make nice black kit like that again.

    I wonder if you can get OS X running on this somehow.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      (assuming that you can stand Windows)

      Oh, well I suppose OpenBSD doesn't have support for hardware acceleration on Skylake graphics yet but if you need that its not Windows it the first fall back option. DragonFlyBSD ought to have it soon (its a work in progress but close at the moment I believe) and I it already works with Linux (as of 4.3).

      Seriously, Windows, an insecure, expensive, illegal to reverse engineer pile of bloated spywhere with MS update root kit should not be in your top 3 choices of operating systems.

      While I wish Genode was read

    • I bought one of these for my dad for Christmas. It's not going to win any benchmarks, and you'll feel it lagging on any processor-intensive tasks. But for office tasks, email, and web browsing it's fine. The biggest annoyances are a mini-HDMI port instead of a regular HDMI port - not that bad in itself, except Asus does not include an adapter. And the beautiful 13.3" 1080p screen is made blurry by Windows 10's (still) inadequate scaling in most apps.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I think the discussion here should be about how MS plans to try and lock any performance increase that we'll see in these upcoming skylake chip benchmarks to win 10.
    http://betanews.com/2016/01/16... [betanews.com]

  • by Anonymous Coward

    dat bezel doe

    captcha: widest

  • by rklrkl ( 554527 ) on Sunday January 31, 2016 @05:11AM (#51407873) Homepage

    The UK price of the $699 tested 256GB SSD model is unbelievably expensive in comparson - it's over 800 pounds ($1200) which is sheer madness and will kill its UK sales. Add the fact that it's very hard to find it with Windows 10 Pro pre-installed (there's another 100 pounds - $150) and this will see near-zero UK business sales.

    • I don't care about Windows, or about the extra cost. As a laptop used day in, day out for a few years, it amounts to pennies per day. I'm still sore that Asus cancelled their 11 inch UX laptops. I guess that means it's time to get the UX21 a new battery rather than get a new machine. 50% heavier? No thanks!

    • by mjwx ( 966435 )

      The UK price of the $699 tested 256GB SSD model is unbelievably expensive in comparson - it's over 800 pounds ($1200) which is sheer madness and will kill its UK sales. Add the fact that it's very hard to find it with Windows 10 Pro pre-installed (there's another 100 pounds - $150) and this will see near-zero UK business sales.

      Asus has never been a big business seller. They sell to people like me who are mobile gamers or professionals who want a lightweight and powerful laptop that is extremely reliable and dont mind shelling out a few extra coins for it. Asus is pretty much the king here, especially if we consider the price point. I've been waiting for Asus to update their Zenbook range with Intel's latest CPU because my old Asus U46SV is getting a bit long in the tooth. It's a 4 year old laptop (2011 model) that has seen 4 con

    • by e r ( 2847683 )
      Why is it so much more expensive in the UK? Are there crazy high taxes over there? Weird regulations? Some lawsuit thing? Why?
  • Can I get it with an operating system that isn't Windows? No? Nevermind then.

    • by ctid ( 449118 )

      I got last year's model, which was sold with Windows-something. I didn't even bother to boot it - I just installed Mint 17.3. Everything except the brightness buttons works fine. I can still adjust the brightness, just not with the function keys.

      • My issue isn't getting Mint or FreeBSD to run on it, it is the fact that I will NOT give MS another dime. Supposedly I can get a refund ... blah blah blah. That has never worked out for me. The only hardware I buy now is MS free from the start.

        • I have four monitors in front of me currently, one of which would qualify as "thin and light" and thus be good for toting around. It has only a power cord, not a power brick. A laptop won't have its power supply integrated, but a monitor just might, and it doesn't necessarily cost extra to choose one that doesn't need a brick. On the keyboard side, go for something wireless that has a trackpad built in and you're good to go. Never take the receiver out of the USB port, and there's nothing to set up. NUC, po
      • Mint is so awesome

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