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+ - Linux-based GPS Units? 4

Submitted by TemporalBeing
TemporalBeing (803363) writes "I'm looking to a GPS unit, in-car windshield mount, for my wife. I know there are some units on the market already that run Linux, and I'd like to lend them my supports over their non-Linux brethren. However, I am quite new to looking at them and looking over TomTom's and Garmin's website does not provide any info on what OS they run. Android or another custom Linux is okay; and I need maps for the U.S.A. So, what do you recommend?"
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Linux-based GPS Units?

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  • Honestly I'm curious as to why this matters to you? Just because the device is running Linux doesn't mean that your purchasing it gives anything back to the community. My only guess is that you are assuming that because someone is using Linux on their device means they are somehow contributing to Linux which is quite simply not the case.
    • Honestly I'm curious as to why this matters to you? Just because the device is running Linux doesn't mean that your purchasing it gives anything back to the community. My only guess is that you are assuming that because someone is using Linux on their device means they are somehow contributing to Linux which is quite simply not the case.

      Agreed. We already see that with TiVo. However, I would much rather support products based on Linux than those based on any version of a proprietary OS, especially Windows Embedded (WinCE/WinMo/WinCE-flavor-of-the-month). The only way to effect markets it to make buying decisions to do so. So if I there is a Linux option available that is at least satisfactory if not on-par competing, then I would like to know so I can check it out and potentially buy it.

  • Many (all?) TomTom units run Linux, and there's already a hacking community around them: OpenTom [opentom.org]

    They offer customized firmware, additional applications, etc.

  • Just because a device runs Linux doesn't mean that it's going to be open in the sense that you can change it to work in a different way; you'd need to duplicate the toolchain as well to be able to do that.

    There are routing programs available that run on vanilla hardware such as navit and gosmore but generic hardware probably isn't going to be as easy to use or as well adapted to the job as something from TomTom or Garmin. You'll also need some data of course - commercial devices licence data from e.g. Tele

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