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Robotics Transportation

In Düsseldorf, A Robot Valet Will Park Your Car 120

Posted by timothy
from the stephen-king-is-taking-notes dept.
stephendavion (2872091) writes In Germany, high tech has come to airport parking. Last week, Düsseldorf airport (DUS) introduced robot valets to take the hassle out of parking for travelers. Travelers can leave their cars at the arrival level of the ParkingPLUS structure. As they leave, they confirm on a touch-screen that no one is in the car. The robot valet, nicknamed "Ray," takes it from there. The robot measures the vehicle, picks it up with a forklift-like system, and takes it to the back area, where it will position it in one of the 249 parking spots reserved for automated valets. The machine is capable of carrying standard cars weighing up to 3.31 tons.
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In Düsseldorf, A Robot Valet Will Park Your Car

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  • by NemoinSpace (1118137) on Saturday July 05, 2014 @01:46AM (#47387013) Homepage Journal
    Maybe we don't want to make our cars any more, but we have plenty of highly skilled valets.
  • Forklift?
    Unless the forklift goes under the wheels, I see this go terribly wrong for many cars. They're not designed to be lifted by forklift.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Forget parking cars, do they gots those robotic hookers I can park my dick in?

  • From the picture it looks like it takes just as much space as a regular parking garage, but I think the real potential in a system like this is in maximizing the density of parked cars. I'm picturing something like an Amazon warehouse, but with cars on each shelf. In places where space is at a premium, this sort of ultra-dense shelving system seems like the right way to store a lot of cars. What would also be awesome would be a smartphone app that gives the garage a heads up 5 minutes before you arrive to p
    • From the picture it looks like it takes just as much space as a regular parking garage, but I think the real potential in a system like this is in maximizing the density of parked cars.

      If you skip the retarded sites like "Mashable" in TFS, you'll find that it actually does increase the density of parking.

      (Even Jalopnik [jalopnik.com] has better information.)

      I'm picturing something like an Amazon warehouse, but with cars on each shelf.

      Those kinds [franky242.net] of shelf parking systems [blogspot.com] already exist, however, they require building an entirely new parking structure [realitypod.com]. The robot "valets" work with existing structures, which means a parking operator can upgrade just for the price of a few robots plus the check-in station, rather than having to tear down and rebuild from scratch. The operator can als

    • I was looking for the robot carpark I used in central london about 15 years ago.
      I did find this video from 1960 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v... [youtube.com]

    • by swb (14022)

      Boats have been stored this way for a long time. Huge warehouse spaces with racks.

    • From the picture it looks like it takes just as much space as a regular parking garage,

      That's pretty much the point: the system is intended to be added to existing regular parking garages, to add comfort to the drivers as well as increase number of parked cars.

      The problem with parking garages today is that they were all designed when cars were 8 inches narrower.

  • They had the same system in downtown Frankfurt already 15 years ago. I know because I used it.
  • by wickerprints (1094741) on Saturday July 05, 2014 @04:24AM (#47387293)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A... [wikipedia.org]

    The basic idea has been around for a while now, in a number of countries besides Germany. And it has less to do with laziness or luxury, and more to do with maximizing the use of valuable space in areas of high urban density. The only thing that appears to be novel here is the use of a free-moving robot rather than a conveyance that is incorporated into the parking structure itself. Granted, there are other benefits as well--being able to retrieve your car rapidly and efficiently reduces parking structure congestion and environmental pollution from excessive idling.

  • It's a neat application, but I'm not sure that it's what most of us would think of as a "robot".
    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      It's a neat application, but I'm not sure that it's what most of us would think of as a "robot".

      Then most of you are idiots, and you should go hang out on the gawker network or similar instead of infesting Slashdot. This is clearly a robot. Maybe it's not a sexy humanoid robot that will suck you off every morning, but it's clearly a robot.

      It's also clearly a product with limited utility, because how long is it going to be before cars are all self-driving? The cars will park themselves in the same sort of garages we have now, but they'll surrender to garage control upon arrival. You'll park in the vale

      • by itzly (3699663)
        On the other hand, this robot valet is cheap and simple to install, so it can be a good choice for upgrading an existing parking garage.
        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          But there's no room in a typical parking garage for pick-and-place, so this is the best you can do.

          On the other hand, this robot valet is cheap and simple to install, so it can be a good choice for upgrading an existing parking garage.

          That's the same hand. HTH, KTHXBYE, HAND

      • Then most of you are idiots

        Right ... 'cause that's how language works. The way that most people use words has no bearing. I forgot.

  • Is it me or does anybody see a problem with this? in that unless you can fork lift the car from in front or behind you need to leave a large amount of space between each car to get the robot in. Which reduces your carpark capacity. Councils in the UK make new carparks with tiny spaces where you have to literally climb out this is done to maximise revenue.
  • No more humans working as parking valets! The trend continues. Make note that agencies do not consider the availability of a trade just the fact that if the job were available the person is able to do it. Therefore you are not disabled even if every trade you can work in is eliminated by technology. You might be blind and confined to a wheelchair but by god you can still weave one heck of a buggy whip and therefore can not be classified as disabled even when no buggy whip factory exists. And being th
  • I vas born in Dusseldorf, and zat is vhy zey call me Rolf.
  • long term parking / offsite much cheaper is alot less then $40 a day to park.

One good reason why computers can do more work than people is that they never have to stop and answer the phone.

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