Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Handhelds KDE Open Source Hardware

Improv Project, Vivaldi Tablet Officially Dead 71

Posted by timothy
from the sad-news dept.
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "It's a sad day for free software as one of the most ambitious free software projects, Improv, is officially dead. Along with the board also dies the promising Vivaldi tablet [video intro]. The developers have sent out emails to the backers of the project that they are pulling plugs on these. The end of the Improv project also means a disappointing end to the KDE Tablet project, as Aaron Seigo was funding both projects out of his own pocket (almost exactly $200,000 spent)."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Improv Project, Vivaldi Tablet Officially Dead

Comments Filter:
  • Re:Hardware is hard (Score:5, Interesting)

    by TechyImmigrant (175943) on Tuesday July 01, 2014 @12:10PM (#47361435) Journal

    Read "hard" as "Expensive as Hell"

    That is part of it yes. It requires a wide range of differently experienced people: low level software, high level software, circuit design, assembly, layout, component sourcing, factory liasion, DFt, Manufacturing etc.

    Then you need to get them all to work together. And you have to pay them.

    The component cost is irrelevant until you get into high volume manufacture.

  • by lkcl (517947) <lkcl@lkcl.net> on Tuesday July 01, 2014 @02:01PM (#47362605) Homepage

    Open hardware sounds cool, but as others have noted, good hardware design is both difficult and expensive. Considering how rapidly the components advance (CPU/SoC, I/O, displays, etc.),

    aaaah gotcha! that's the _whole_ reason why i designed the long-term modular standards, so that products *can* be split around the arms race of CPU/SoC on the one hand and battery life / display etc. on the other.

    and the factory that we are in touch with (the big one), they _love_ this concept, because the one thing that you might not be aware of is that even the big guys cannot react fast enough nowadays.

    imagine what it would mean to them to be able to buy HUGE numbers of CPUs (and related components), drop them into a little module that they KNOW is going to work across every single product that conforms to the long-term standard. in 6 months time there will be a faster SoC, more memory, less power, but that's ok, because *right now* they can get better discounts on the SoC that's available *now*.

    on the other side of the interface, imagine what it would mean to them that they could buy the exact same components for a base unit for well... three to five years (or until something better came along or some component went end-of-life)?

    it took them a while, but they _loved_ the idea. the problem is: as a PRC State-Sponsored company they are *prohibited* from doing anything other than following the rules... i can't tell you what those rules are: they're confidential, but it meant that we had to find other... creative ways to get the designs made.

    We're in a world where a first generation Nexus 7 tablet sells for $140 or less. At Walmart.

    yeah. now that prices are dropping, just like the PC price wars, the profits are becoming so small that the manufacturers are getting alarmed (or just dropping out of the market entirely). those people are now looking for something else. they're willing to try something that might get them a profit. what should we tell them?

    anyway: thank you for your post, darylb, it provides a very useful starting point for some of the key insights i want to get across to people.

Parkinson's Law: Work expands to fill the time alloted it.

Working...