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Data Storage Upgrades

Samsung Release First SSD With 3D NAND 85

Posted by timothy
from the turning-up-the-volume dept.
Vigile (99919) writes "As SSD controllers continue to evolve, so does the world of flash memory. With the release of the Samsung 850 Pro SSD announced today, Samsung is the first company to introduce 3D NAND technology to the consumer. By using 30nm process technology that might seem dated in some applications, Samsung has been reliably able to stack lithography and essentially "tunnel holes" in the silicon while coating the inside with the material necessary to hold a charge. The VNAND being used with the Samsung 850 Pro is now 32 layers deep, and though it lowers the total capacity per die, it allows Samsung to lower manufacturer costs with more usable die per wafer. This results in more sustainable and reliable performance as well as a longer life span, allowing Samsung to offer a 10 year warranty on the new drives. PC Perspective has a full review with performance results and usage over time that shows Samsung's innovation is leading the pack."
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Samsung Release First SSD With 3D NAND

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  • Re:USD/GB? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by K. S. Kyosuke (729550) on Tuesday July 01, 2014 @11:16AM (#47360421)
    Yes, lowering manufacturer costs. That is the way for Samsung to get richer, not lowering your costs. ;-)
  • Re:USD/GB? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by KozmoStevnNaut (630146) <henrikstevn@nOSPam.gmail.com> on Tuesday July 01, 2014 @11:19AM (#47360453)

    That's a pretty nasty duty cycle, wouldn't it be better to use a massive RAM disk instead, if you need that much constant I/O traffic?

    For your average consumer or even professional user, pretty much any SSD on the market will easily outlast the rest of the PC, barring any catastrophic failures. There was a test recently that concluded that you're pretty guaranteed at least 500TB of writes before failure. That's a hell of a lot of data.

  • by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Tuesday July 01, 2014 @11:57AM (#47360781) Homepage Journal

    10 yr warranty on something that will be obsolete in much less time, bought only by those who keep current with tech?

    10 years means it's either not a piece of shit that will fail within a couple years or Samsung is going to bankrupt their storage division doing it. a) is more likely.

    SSD failures are a pain in the ass, especially when you have to drive a couple hundred miles to replace them. And even if the machines are close, it costs human time and on-call pages to deal with them. Unreliable gear is a nightmare.

    The only SSD's I've had working for years and years have been Intel SLC units. I'm hoarding a box of dozens of failed Kingstons, Mushkins, Crucials, etc. on the mistaken belief that I'll ever send them in to claim the warranties (the truth is I won't trust their replacements so why bother unless I'm going to triple-RAID mirror the things).

    For somebody like me who does not want to worry about the SSD's failing before they get replaced, this is exactly what I'm in the market for. A buck a gig? Sold.

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