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Portables (Apple) Hardware Apple

GPUs Dropping Dead In 2011 MacBook Pro Models 359

Posted by Soulskill
from the satisfaction-is-not-guaranteed dept.
New submitter blackwizard writes "MacRumors is reporting on pervasive GPU failures in 2011 MacBook Pro machines, leading both to intermittent video issues, corruption, crashing/freezing, and eventually even failure to boot. Luckily for Apple, the machines are now out of warranty (unless you bought AppleCare). The issues have been reported both on Apple's own forums and other blogs. Apple has so far failed to take action on the problem. Will they take ownership of the issue, or continue to ask customers to pay for an entire new logic board when just the GPU fails?"
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GPUs Dropping Dead In 2011 MacBook Pro Models

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 18, 2014 @12:43PM (#45998867)

    Thankfully, I was there to tell them "I told you so."

  • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Saturday January 18, 2014 @12:46PM (#45998883) Homepage

    If it was faulty then it should have failed in the first days. That it happens three years later is a sign that the user is to blame.

    For not buying a new machine after the warranty expires?

    I am intrigued by your ideas and I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 18, 2014 @12:52PM (#45998931)

    MacBooks are mostly used for appearance. Surely, the hipsters can go to a coffee shop with one that doesn't have a working GPU.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 18, 2014 @12:58PM (#45998989)

    A laptop built by my company has serious issues with GPUs dropping ead. Now, should we initiate a recall? Take the number of laptops in the field, A, multiply by the probable rate of failure, B, multiply by the average out-of-court settlement, C. A times B times C equals X. If X is less than the cost of a recall, we don't do one.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday January 18, 2014 @01:14PM (#45999087)

    Shit, I'm getting really worried now. I've got a 2011 MacBook Pro and I do so much Ruby on Rails and JavaScript. I wake up at 4 am every day and then I put on my fedora, my anime t-shirt and I write Ruby on Rails and JavaScript libraries until 3 am the next day. Sometimes I don't even eat and urinate, but that's beside the point.

    Could all my hardcore Rubying be causing my MacBook Pro to die? I do push it pretty hard. A lot of the coding I'm doing is webscale. I even use NoSQL I'm dealing with so much data. My web app's logging subsystem logs almost 2 GB of data a month. When you're dealing with a lot of data like that a superpowerful database like Mongo then I can understand my poor little MacBook having a hard time coping. Maybe I'm pushing her too hard?

    I can't just ease up though. I've got so many Ruby on Rails web apps to write and so many JavaScript libraries to craft. This is a life or death situation for me. I don't want it to be a life or death situation for my MacBook either. We've been through so much! I remember writing my very first line of code ever on my laptop. It was a Ruby code and it made me feel really good. Now I'm an accomplished software architect with numerous Web 2.0 web sites under my belt like for the local veterinarian and the herbal store down the street.

    Now I really don't know what to do. I'm so confused. I want my MacBook to live forever because it has become part of me. But I need to use her, too. I need her to do my Ruby on Rails coding and my JavaScript programming. I need to use my NoSQL DB but if it hurts my MacBook Pro, do I really want to use it? I just don't know any more.

  • by Bing Tsher E (943915) on Saturday January 18, 2014 @01:33PM (#45999229) Journal

    3. Keep remaining good hand clear of the Genius Bar.

  • by viperidaenz (2515578) on Saturday January 18, 2014 @03:12PM (#45999859)

    A place I worked at lost a whole bunch of hard drives from HP laptops just after the warranty expired.
    Turned out the HP sticker they put on the drives covered the ventilation hole that says "do not cover".

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