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Data Storage Businesses

OCZ May Be On Its Last Legs 292

Posted by Soulskill
from the long-term-warranty-looking-less-useful dept.
itwbennett writes "OCZ, one of the first commercial solid-state drive (SSD) makers has been blaming a shortage of NAND for its woes for some time now, but things have taken a precipitous turn for the worse: 'For its second fiscal quarter ended August 31, 2013, revenue was $33.5 million, a huge drop compared to revenue of $55.3 million for the first quarter of 2013 and revenue of $88.6 million for the second quarter of 2012. The net loss for this quarter was massive, $26 million, a doubling of the $13.1 million loss in the same quarter last year.' The company has burned through cash, its stock collapsed, and now so have sales. Meanwhile, other SSD makers are doing well. So what is happening here?"
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OCZ May Be On Its Last Legs

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  • Tiniest violin (Score:5, Insightful)

    by stonecypher (118140) <{moc.liamg} {ta} {rehpycenots}> on Saturday October 19, 2013 @11:41AM (#45175201) Homepage Journal

    They burned too many customers with "enterprise" devices that'd fail almost immediately, then treating the customers like shit when they did.

    They bet too heavily on high performance, while not maintaining the kind of behavior that would bring back the customers who want devices like that.

    The reason Dell and HP can get away with burning customers is simple: there's always another person who needs a cheap laptop.

    Not many people need a new PCIe SSD.

    Good riddance.

    • Re:Tiniest violin (Score:4, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:11PM (#45175415)

      True story:

      I bought a 240 GB Vertex 3 back in 2011 at a considerable expense... I put it in my laptop and immediately, my laptop would crash (BSOD) every 20 minutes, continuously. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SandForce#Issues

      I attempted to contact OCZ but their phone support directed me to an online forum. There, they said it was a known problem with laptops' powersaving mode, and to flash it. I said, ok, where's the flashing program for windows? The tech said (via a post) that there was no flashing utility for windows. I would have to use Linux. I said that I couldn't just wipe my hard drive and install linux, and the guy laughed at me and told me to buy another hard drive.

      So I did. I went to a competitor, left a horrible review of my experience on Amazon, and never used OCZ again. http://www.amazon.com/review/R1GYKQFNH227GT/ref=cm_cr_rdp_perm

      • Re:Tiniest violin (Score:5, Informative)

        by jones_supa (887896) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:18PM (#45175463)

        The tech said (via a post) that there was no flashing utility for windows. I would have to use Linux. I said that I couldn't just wipe my hard drive and install linux, and the guy laughed at me and told me to buy another hard drive.

        Intel did the right thing and deployed their SSD upgrade software [intel.com] as a bootable CD. In my opinion, this is currently the best way to distribute any kind of PC firmware. You can burn the disc from inside any operating system, and when you boot from that medium, you get a nice clean environment to update the device without a full-blown OS interfering with the process.

        • Re:Tiniest violin (Score:4, Informative)

          by CurryCamel (2265886) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @01:12PM (#45175787) Journal
          OCZ does that too: http://ocz.com/consumer/download/firmware [ocz.com]. GP had a case of bad tech support, I guess.
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by dindi (78034)

          Except for the people who don't own a single optical drive. Not trolling, Being an Apple user first I freaked out. Then now back to Linux and somehow don't miss them. So when I put a server and a desktop machine together, I didn't put an optical drive in them at all.

          I think the right way to do it is to give users a bootable USB drive. Or offer the download with a utility to make a drive bootable.

          I have probably 50 driver CDs in a shelf I never opened and this plastic nonsense has to end right now.

          my 2c ...

          • For most purposes, a relatively tiny utility program can handle any messy details of turning a CD image into a bootable flash drive (whether said tiny utility program is provided for the CD image you care about...) so the two approaches aren't really mutually exclusive. Though I'd certainly treat a vendor who expected 'burn a CD' to be an acceptable mandatory step, without treating usb-stick users as a serious consideration, about as seriously as the same idiots who kept assuming that everybody had floppy d
      • Re:Tiniest violin (Score:5, Informative)

        by iserlohn (49556) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @01:10PM (#45175777) Homepage

        A lot of SSDs support SATA Aggessive Link Power Management (ie. SATA powersaving), but has stability issues when it is enabled. To fix this under Linux -

        https://access.redhat.com/site/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html/Power_Management_Guide/ALPM.html [redhat.com]

        I have no idea how to disable this under Windows, but having turned off ALPM, all of my Sandforce SSDs have been rock solid. Even my Crucial M500 has problems with ALPM on max, I had to turn it down to medium to prevent it from crashing regularly and taking the filesystem with it.

    • Re:Tiniest violin (Score:5, Informative)

      by dc29A (636871) * on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:16PM (#45175449)

      They also replaced the 34nm Vertex 2 drives with 25nm drives [tomshardware.com], lowering speed and space without changing the model number. They are scum.

      • Re:Tiniest violin (Score:4, Interesting)

        by girlintraining (1395911) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:44PM (#45175625)

        They also replaced the 34nm Vertex 2 drives with 25nm drives, lowering speed and space without changing the model number. They are scum.

        Worse than scum. I hope they die in a fire. My OCZ drive has started locking up and showing bad sectors and they won't RMA it. They just say "Oh, unplug it, wait an hour, then wipe it." ... Yeah. The bad sectors disappear... until the first time the OS tries to write to those sectors. Their warranties can't even be used as toilet paper.

        They didn't "bet on higher performance", they bet on shit construction, no quality control... hell, you can't even update the firmware using the tools they provide on the website unless you plug a second drive in and install an OS on it. Now yes, many of us geeky types can install a mini-XP or Windows 7 on a flash drive and be on our merry, but really... how can you expect Joe Power Gamer to do something like that? Simple: You can't.

        It's not just the poor quality and construction of the drives that fucked them, but a complete and utter disregard for any level of customer service. No, I recant on my last statement... death by fire is too good for them. Let us create a new 'ocz' internet meme to immortalize this level of fail. >.

        • by AmiMoJo (196126) *

          This is why I like the EU warranty system. The warranty is with the shop you bought it from, not the manufacturer. The onus is generally on the shop to show that it wasn't some kind of manufacturing or quality defect, i.e. you broke it. In cases like yours there would be very little the shop could do to wriggle out of getting it replaced. If OCZ won't do warranty replacements the shop loses out and stops stocking them, and you get a refund or replacement drive.

          In other words manufacturers can't get away wit

      • Off topic, but could you please tell me which of the seventeen different domains I need to whitelist in NoScript so the combo box page listing doesn't cover the top three paragraphs of text? Tomshardware.com didn't do it.
    • This is the status quo for OCZ. I still don't understand why people are surprised. They were scamming people on memory back in 2001 - lying about the size of the company, lying about their storefront, etc. etc. etc. I was burned by them back then when they sold me faulty memory sticks, then refused to warranty them. The sad part is most of that saga was lost when hardforums broke off from hardocp.com.
      • Can you explain why hardOCP and hardforums are separate? The way they do linking is incredibly annoying. THe article title always links to hardforum instead of the source.
        • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HardOCP#Hard.7CForum [wikipedia.org]

          It is likely they run them two separate businesses to protect each other from liability.

        • It's been so long I honestly don't recall what the reasoning was at the time. I believe it had to do with server infrastructure. At the time I don't think there was a good way to separate out traffic on the same domain (at least not when you were talking year 2000 with a shoestring budget), so they just picked up a new domain and pointed it at a new server.
    • Agreed. I've had two OCZ products fail immediately - the one I bought and the replacement they sent me. That was a few years ago, when USB drives were still new and expensive, but I remember that buying experience and have avoided the brand ever since.
    • by mcrbids (148650)

      Agreed on OCZ, we tried their products and it has become a running gag to NEVER trust an OCZ product.

      But as a happy Dell laptop user, I take exception to your dig at Dell. We've tried HP, had an utterly miserable experience compared to Dell. We buy Dells with the 3-year full warranty. Problems are relatively uncommon, and get taken care of quickly. Not sure what you would object to?

    • by dindi (78034)

      You seem to have a different experience I run OCZ in 3 24/7 machines ( 2 OS/x 1 linux) ... the only SSD drive that failed on me was on my Macbook Air, and it was a Samsung, and it was a "freeze, then all data gone and drive unrecognisable" nasty failure (thanks Apple for time machine, really) ...

      The OCZ drives are Vertex 4 and Agility 3 drives (latter in the Linux box, crunching data all day, writing to a mysql db non-stop - data collection app) ..

      I am happy with the drives, but would double-think getting a

  • Easy. (Score:5, Informative)

    by Dzimas (547818) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @11:41AM (#45175205)
    Rightly or wrongly, they earned a reputation for selling unreliable drives. Last winter I saw quite a few deals on mass market websites that featured refurbished OCZ drives at cut-rate prices -- I suspect they had a return rate that was significantly higher than the industry average.
    • Re:Easy. (Score:5, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 19, 2013 @11:47AM (#45175245)

      You suspect correctly, the last stats I saw said:

      OCZ: 6%
      Industry average: 2%
      Samsung: 0.5%
      Intel: 0.3%

      • Re:Easy. (Score:5, Insightful)

        by cyberjock1980 (1131059) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:07PM (#45175387)

        If you could provide a source(even if your numbers aren't completely accurate) you would make me very happy. I have been unable to find anything that discusses reliability of different manufacturers like you just described.

        I have always sworn by Intel while friends have bought OCZ(because they were cheaper per GB) and several have had nothing but problems but others have sworn their OCZ was rock solid. On the other hand, I bought only Intels since the day the G2 series hit the market. Every single one is still in use and none of them have had any problems. In fact, I haven't had to reinstall windows as often as I've had to in the past. Not sure if its because Win7 is better than WinXP, the SSDs are more reliable than platter based disks, or both.

        But even then, I still swear by Intel every time a friend makes a recommendation, regardless of the benchmarks and the (often) slightly higher price per GB.

    • by Cimexus (1355033)

      Yep, I think that's right. I had an early OCZ drive blow up on me quite a few years ago and never bought another since. I have bought several SSDs from Corsair and most recently Samsung instead.

      First impressions often matter, especially when the industry itself (SSDs) is new.

      • What has the reliability of the Corsair drives been? I don't currently have a clear picture whether it's a good or bad brand when it comes to SSDs.
    • by gweihir (88907)

      The reputation for unreliability is deserved. I even had one drive that would return different data on reads (about 10% of the time for the affected area) and never reported a checksum violation. That is only possible if disk checksums are not implemented, which is gross engineering negligence. Never had any funny business with several Samsung SSDs and they are neither slower nor more expensive. OCZ was a player that tried to make it with speed as its main argument but completely overlooked what people use

  • Of course (Score:5, Insightful)

    by djupedal (584558) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @11:43AM (#45175215)
    All niche market products suffer the same fate when expectations for broad market type growth are assumed.
  • Shitty unreliable drives that are way over priced and they treat there customers like shit ... this was easily predictable

  • Rebates (Score:5, Interesting)

    by apcullen (2504324) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:10PM (#45175413)
    They also used rebates to make their products seem $20 less expensive. There's a new rebate every week, and the rebate expires after a week. So you must file for your rebate the day you purchase, or by the time to go to collect the rebate yours will have expired.Got burned by this once. Didn't turn me into a repeat customer.
    • Re:Rebates (Score:4, Insightful)

      by evilviper (135110) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:48PM (#45175661) Journal

      by the time to go to collect the rebate yours will have expired.Got burned by this once. Didn't turn me into a repeat customer.

      Funny... Similar experience didn't convinced me to avoid company XYZ, but instead to completely avoid any and all mail-in rebates... The whole idea is a complete scam that is easily and frequently abused.

  • Vertex 2 (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Rob Hostetter (2908585) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:11PM (#45175419)
    I bought a vertex 2 when it first came out due to its incredible speed for use in a server. After a year the server slowed down to way slower than hard drives. I researched it to find out, that they built in a limiter, if you exceed the IO that will burn through the drive before the warranty ended they slowed down the drive so that it would last. This made the drive useless to me. I had to replace it with an intel drive. I will never buy another OCZ SSD.
    • Re:Vertex 2 (Score:4, Interesting)

      by edmudama (155475) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:51PM (#45175683)

      In fairness, most vendors have this option.

      You can either choose a 3/5 year warranty, and the drive will slow itself down to guarantee it lasts.

      Or, you can choose to go by the "gas gauge" and your warranty may expire after 8 months or whatever of full-speed IO.

      When you buy server-grade drives, they usually sell you a gas gauge model.

  • by abigsmurf (919188) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:14PM (#45175437)
    Their failure rates were abysmal. A drive failing after 6 months is appalling. A drive failing suddenly after 6 months, suddenly with zero warning is completely unacceptable. Even if you have a backup routine, that's probably going to result in days of lost work, plus the need to re-install everything on another drive whilst you RMA it.

    To add financial injury to insult, in the UK, RMA'ing an OCZ drive requires you to send it insured and recorded to the Netherlands. It cost me around £20 to send it off. I'm certainly never going to buy OCZ again. The 15% return rate for OCZ drives that failed after 1 year is unacceptable and frankly, should've been grounds for a recall.
    • by gl4ss (559668)

      ..uk doesn't have laws that the place that sold you the drive is responsible for dealing with the rma (that is, you "rma" the drive to the company that sold it you since it's defective and broke under 2 years..)? that's how you deal with it in most of europe.

      • by abigsmurf (919188)
        They're only responsibility for the minimum, vaguely defined, time period (typically six months), past that you'll be referred back to the manufacturer for the term of the warranty.
        • by Iskender (1040286)

          Wow, that's bad. Here in Finland, it's usually one year of specifically stated store warranty, and often more.

          Only when there's a second or third year of warranty is it common to have to deal with the manufacturer.

  • Good riddance (Score:5, Informative)

    by jettoblack (683831) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:21PM (#45175487)

    I had terrible experiences with their drives and tech support. In one instance, to solve a Windows blue screen problem, their support told us to update the firmware on the drive, which bricked it. They then refused to return/repair the drive because "firmware updates void your warranty." In another case, we needed a quick replacement on a failed drive so we requested advance replacement. They immediately charged our card MSRP (double the actual retail price), but then it took them over 30 days to actually ship the replacement.

    • >their support told us to update the firmware on the drive, which bricked it. They then refused to return/repair the drive because "firmware updates void your warranty."

      I think my response to OCZ would have been: "I am contacting my state attorney general and petitioning that your products be banned from sales here."

  • by Bite The Pillow (3087109) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @12:22PM (#45175497)

    The quote in the article blames capital constraints, and difficulty acquiring, not a shortage. They are likely buying cheaper supply with higher failure rates, creating a death spiral.
    If that is not the case, the author should kick himself in the balls repeatedly for using unrelated quotes to support a point, as I can't be arsed to dig past that stupidity.
    Non story, failing company cuts corners and fails faster.

  • I don't know about other people, but I had nothing but bad experiences with their DRAM products. I would call their tech support and usually get a voicemail. They would never return those calls. If I called anothe department (sales always answered), they would just forward me to the same voicemail. If I was persistent enough, calling enoug times per day, I might get someone on the phone with technical support.

    Their "performance" DRAM products seemed to deteriorate over time. I would configure my system

  • Can we finally put the to bed the idea that being the first (or near first) mover into a specific market is important in carving out a long-term leadership role in that space, and perhaps have people focus instead on making a superior product instead?

    • No. Being the first mover with a mediocre product might have worked. Being one tenth as reliable and dodging warranty fulfillment wipes out any advantage.
      Myth it may be, but this does nothing to bust it.

  • by Just Brew It! (636086) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @01:14PM (#45175799)

    The article quotes the CEO as saying the company is struggling due to "capital constraints". Then right below that, "This has been a common refrain. OCZ reports lower sales, it blames a shortage of NAND." Does the author truly not understand the difference between a shortage of cash to fund ongoing operations, and a shortage of parts?

    Regardless, I don't see their departure from the scene as a great loss. Their spotty reputation for quality and customer service has caused me to avoid their products in general, and has apparently come back to bite them in the ass. The only sad part is that they might take PC Power and Cooling (one of the premier PSU manufacturers from back in the day, which OCZ acquired a few years ago) down with the ship.

  • by Miamicanes (730264) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @01:35PM (#45175947)

    There's an even better reason why nobody wants to sell flash to OCZ -- they've tainted the entire SSD industry so badly with their crap drives, no reputable manufacturer of flash wants to have its good name tarnished by association with them.

    A lot of OCZ's problems were self-inflicted, with Sandforce's active complicity.

    For example, Sandforce's engineers came up with an ugly, performance-killing hack that allowed the drive to avoid corruption if it were powered-down mid-write so they could officially claim that the ultracapacitor was "optional" in "cost-sensitive applications". OCZ built drives without the ultracap, then had Sandforce furnish them with firmware that DISABLED THAT SAFETY MEASURE to avoid killing their drives' write performance in benchmarks.

    Mark my words. If OCZ doesn't go bankrupt on its own accord, they're eventually going to get put out of business by a class-action lawsuit like the one that nailed HP almost 20 years ago. I'm talking about the one where HP's management intentionally ignored their engineers, and sold CD burners that didn't have enough RAM to buffer a complete track & instead depended upon Windows to feed them a steady stream of data with a degree of lockstep precision that Windows could neither promise nor reliably sustain even though their own engineers told them it couldn't work reliably, and was GUARANTEED to turn at least 5-20% of discs burned into coasters (back when a blank CD cost SEVERAL DOLLARS).

    HP's engineers DID have a way to allow the drives to be reliably used without the buffer... write the .iso file to a FAT16 volume, then boot directly into DOS from a floppy to do the burning. However, like OCZ's management (who wanted the performance of an ultracap-protected drive, without the cost of the ultracap itself), HP's management wanted a cheap drive that could burn CDs under Windows, even if it meant they had to knowingly LIE about its ability to actually DO it.

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      sold CD burners that didn't have enough RAM to buffer a complete track & instead depended upon Windows to feed them a steady stream of data with a degree of lockstep precision that Windows could neither promise nor reliably sustain even though their own engineers told them it couldn't work reliably, and was GUARANTEED to turn at least 5-20% of discs burned into coasters (back when a blank CD cost SEVERAL DOLLARS).

      ..but that's how I remember every cd burner to have been back in the day. would have been absurd to stuff 600mb of ram(one data track) into the burner when your pc had 4-8mbytes... only after 4x speed drives or so the drives(no matter which manufacturer) started to come with some tech which made buffer underflows non-fatal for burning..

      • by 0123456 (636235)

        ...but that's how I remember every cd burner to have been back in the day. would have been absurd to stuff 600mb of ram(one data track) into the burner when your pc had 4-8mbytes... only after 4x speed drives or so the drives(no matter which manufacturer) started to come with some tech which made buffer underflows non-fatal for burning..

        Hint: when they said 'track', they probably meant it in the same sense as a hard disk track: one write around the circumference of the disk. CDs are spiral, aren't they, rather than divided into tracks the way disks are?

        Yes, in the old days, we had to be very careful to ensure that the drive buffer never went empty when writing to CD, but the best way to ensure that was to have enough RAM in the drive to cover any conceivable delay on the machine providing the data. Even a small reduction in the amount of

      • by Miamicanes (730264) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @03:24PM (#45176689)

        It didn't need 650mb, it just needed to be a lot bigger than the absurdly small buffers HP shipped with.

        Think of an assembly line at a cookie factory with a badly-designed packing mechanism that blindly assumes (and depends upon) there being a cookie every 24 inches -- centered on a white dot printed onto the belt -- without fail, and shuts down the entire assembly line if it finds a gap without a cookie.

        Now, assume the cookies get placed on the conveyor belt by one person who has a bucket of cookies in hand, seated in front of a 12-inch gap where the conveyor belt emerges from one slot, passes across an open area, and disappears into a second slot. The employee has exactly 5 seconds to grab a cookie from the bucket, and exactly 5 seconds to place the cookie on the dot on the conveyor belt before repeating. Now, suppose the employee is holding the cookie, ready to place it on the conveyor belt, and sneezes. To avoid spreading infection, he or she turns around to sneeze away from both the cookies and conveyor belt. Unfortunately, the sneeze takes 6 seconds to perform and recover from, so the dot disappears into the second slot without a cookie. If we're burning a metaphorical CD with those cookies, that sneeze has just caused a coaster.

        THAT was the fundamental problem with HP's small buffer. It depended upon having the undivided attention of Windows for frequent, short intervals of time with ZERO tolerance for distraction.

        In contrast, a larger buffer would be like an assembly line that shuffles cookies towards multiple bins. As soon as a bin is full, the flow of cookies into it gets temporarily halted (with enough room to buffer/queue a few cookies in the meantime), a new empty bag falls into place, and the queued-up cookies are allowed to fall into it immediately, then continue until the next bag is full.

        In the real world, it's ALWAYS harder to guarantee data at some precise trickle than to allow it to just gush in spurts and be buffered at the same net data rate.A lot of people think "realtime" means "fast". It doesn't. It just means "deterministic" (often, deterministically-constant). A large buffer allows you to deliver a deterministic trickle of data transmitted in a bursty, non-deterministic manner.

  • by smash (1351)
    warranty claims :D
  • I think this is the SSD market maturing. For a while, Intel had good, but expensive drives. Then Intel stagnated for a while, as OCZ aimed to be the performance leader, but firmware issues and failed drives burned a bunch of us. Fast forward to today, and we see Samsung being very price aggressive with fast drives that are reliable. That's a perfect storm for OCZ.

    Customer service was so bad, that I couldn't hear a word of their marketing.

  • This goes for OCZ, Corsair, Razer... They bet on male teenager gamer hype, not quality.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      To be fair, I've only had one pair of Corsair DIMMs fail, ever. That one was because a power supply failed and shorted the motherboard and RAM as a result. less than 5 minutes on a phone call to Corsair and I had an RMA number. I even told them exactly what happened, I think they even sent a postage paid return shipping label. I now have 3 Corsaird Power Supplies in use (one for almost 3years, the other 2 less than 2 months) no issues with any of them yet.

      Oh, and I'm 34. I'm more than happy to pay a premium

    • by hibiki_r (649814) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @06:22PM (#45177581)

      I'd not put corsair in the same bucket as the other two. Their RAM, for instance, will not spontaneously combust. The other two... yeah, you don't have to look very far to see that they have the build quality of white branded parts.

      It's a problem when you look for, say, mechanical keyboards. Even companies that used to make good stuff, like das, now have cut costs so that you are going to get more life out of a random membrane keyboard.

      • by sl3xd (111641)

        Even companies that used to make good stuff, like das, now have cut costs so that you are going to get more life out of a random membrane keyboard.

        Das doesn't make the switches; Cherry does. Nearly every mechanical keyboard manufacturer these days uses Cherry MX switches, which are rated for 50 million cycles. Whether you're buying a mechanical keyboard from Das, WASD, Ducky, Razer, or any of a host of others, you're getting the exact same 50-million cycle switches.

        In contrast, a membrane keyboard's switche

    • by Pinhedd (1661735)

      I disagree. Corsair products are almost always of high build quality and reliability. They use reputable OEMs to manufacture their high end products (Flextronics/Seasonic for their PSUs) and have some of the best cases around. I wouldn't trade my Obsidian 800D for anything except for a 900D.

  • I bought a couple of OCZ drives over the last few years for different computers and they all work fine. I'm not worried that they will fail and wipe my data because I only put programs and operating system stuff there (as shouldn't all of us here on /.?). I never bought the 'high end' gamer stuff. My data goes on a HDD and when I compile stuff and install it, it then goes on the SSD for fast performance. When I am working on something distributed from SSD it is backed up online through a version controll system so I don't lose anything major in the event of a fire or disk failure. For servers, you should have an RAID array of SSDs and the OCZs have been cheaper, so you should expect that they might fail -- but this should not impact what you do.

  • by RubberDogBone (851604) on Saturday October 19, 2013 @09:00PM (#45178375)

    Pity PC Power & Cooling is apparently going down with the OCZ ship. For the better part of a decade, I always heard PP&C PSUs were the best and they had prices to match that rep. I could never hope to afford one.

    And then OCZ bought them, and curiously, the positive reviews became harder to find and the off-the-cuff remarks ("Hey so and so is a good brand of whatever, check it out!") stopped entirely.

    Suddenly the prices had dropped into the normal range and now a 760 watt PP&C PSU is like $60. And you get an AMEX rebate card with it. The PSU itself is just some outsourced part they got from who knows where.

  • by niftymitch (1625721) on Sunday October 20, 2013 @03:08AM (#45179413)

    Do watch the SSD market. I noticed that the local Frys is looking to all but purge their
    inventory.

    Is there a price jump, a price cut or some new stuff hitting the market?
    I was all set to buy a SSD disk but the prices did not make sense and
    the display astoundingly bollixed and confused.

    My current plan is to move to a SSD and the new AC network links.
    I can have large storage on my router/ cloud/ drive/ dropbox/ resource
    and a light quick laptop with modest storage. The speed of SSD devices
    is getting to be a serous game changer at home and at work.

    But these OCZ folks seem to have stepped in it badly.

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