Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×
Math Software Hardware Games

One Cool Day Job: Building Algorithms For Elevators 203

Posted by timothy
from the getting-it-up-is-only-half-the-battle dept.
McGruber writes "The Wall Street Journal has an article about Theresa Christy, a mathematician who develops algorithms for Otis Elevator Company, the world's largest manufacturer and maintainer of people-moving products including elevators, escalators and moving walkways. As an Otis research fellow, Ms. Christy writes strings of code that allow elevators to do essentially the greatest good for the most people — including the building's owner, who has to allocate considerable space for the concrete shafts that house the cars. Her work often involves watching computer simulation programs that replay elevator decision-making. 'I feel like I get paid to play videogames. I watch the simulation, and I see what happens, and I try to improve the score I am getting,' she says."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

One Cool Day Job: Building Algorithms For Elevators

Comments Filter:
  • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdot @ h a c k i s h.org> on Saturday December 01, 2012 @03:56PM (#42156199)

    'I feel like I get paid to play videogames. I watch the simulation, and I see what happens, and I try to improve the score I am getting,' she says.

    I've been looking for a more sophisticated follow-up to SimTower for a while now. I'd buy Otis Elevator Tycoon.

    • by westlake (615356) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:21PM (#42156413)

      I've been looking for a more sophisticated follow-up to SimTower for a while now. I'd buy Otis Elevator Tycoon.

      This gets modded up as a joke, but the interaction of tech and people within a mega-structure seems to me a solid foundation on which to build a game. But I can think of only Sim Tower and Startopia as examples.

    • by the_rajah (749499) * on Saturday December 01, 2012 @06:48PM (#42157263) Homepage
      I designed the hardware and wrote the code for a much smaller elevator company for 25 years... All written in assembly language running on an 8085 CPU with 256 bytes (Yes, bytes) if RAM and 8K bytes of EPROM. It doesn't take much to handle the basics when you're using assembly language. I've done up to 26 stops in a multi-car group with that setup. Each elevator is independent and can run on its own, but they communicate with each other to handle dispatching so multiple cars coordinate their activity.

      Optimizing is worthwhile, but adds a lot of complexity. You have to take into account for car locations, direction, speed, where car and hall calls are locatedand have to figure in such things as door times to calculate which car can service a hall call soonest.

      As the author says, it's a set of interesting problems and I've had fun with it. Yes, the equipment I designed and wrote the software for is obsolete now, but there's a lot of it out there so I'm anticipating writing updates for a while longer as I head toward eventual retirement.
      • by anubi (640541) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @07:52PM (#42157699) Journal
        I sure wish cities would hire guys like you to work on their traffic lights.

        I highly question whether or not anyone pays any attention at all to the timings of these things; It seems that they would have more luck getting anyone who has ever milked a cow to design one, as they would have some inner sense as to how timing results in smooth flow. Improperly time your efforts and you get no milk and infuriate the cow.

        ( You can tell where I was raised here ).
        • by cynyr (703126) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @09:42PM (#42158315)

          In my case, the lights on a local hwy are sync'ed for good driving by the city. The issue is that every time you cross city lines (about 4 times in 6 miles) the timing changes again.

          I have also heard stories where there was pressure on the city to raise the speed limit from say 45MPH to 50MPH for a bit of road. Well the city gave in and raised the limit, but didn't change the timing. Driving the speed limit will get you stuck at lights, but driving the limit the city wanted it to be will mean lots of greens. There are roads around here where this is the case, 5 under and you hit every light green, so I mostly believe the story.

        • by Shinobi (19308) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @09:52PM (#42158369)

          As the parent mentioned, timing involves multiple cars. It's the same thing in optimizing traffic light timings, they can't just factor one direction on a single road. You have to consider parallell roads, crossing roads, highway on- and off-ramp locations and all the traffic loads and the resultant traffic flow patterns. Needless to say, for even a moderate-size city, it's an incredibly complex problem.

        • I sure wish cities would hire guys like you to work on their traffic lights.

          I highly question whether or not anyone pays any attention at all to the timings of these things; It seems that they would have more luck getting anyone who has ever milked a cow to design one, as they would have some inner sense as to how timing results in smooth flow. Improperly time your efforts and you get no milk and infuriate the cow.

          The problem is light timing is a very hard problem. First off, take a basic city with a grid style street layout. You can optimize the greens for flows in certain directions, but then the cross streets often get blocked up because they don't have an optimized pattern.

          You can try optimizing flows differently - perhaps two get timed greens southbound because everyone's heading home (and they turn northbound int he morning rush), while a third street goes the other way. If you go southbound on that, you'll hit lights (and it's actually faster to navigate to the other streets than taking a direct route). Yes, the longer way can be faster because only some streets have timed lights in order to not cause total gridlock looking for an optimal solution. The goal is to find which ones are timed in which direction at what times (because the primary flow differs due to morning and afternoon rushes), and to see if the time it takes to navigate to the longer but timed routes is faster than the time it takes to go by the obvious route. In some places, the lights are timed in a circle (one street north, one street west, one street south, one street east) so choosing the optimal path may mean going the opposite direction to join it quicker.

          Next, you have complications like parking, left/right turn lanes/lights/not-allowed. And idiot drivers who floor it at the green to hit the red in front, or more likely, those who see the light ahead is red, and don't move much above creeping speed to not have to slow down much.

          And the lights are also timed to a speed - a road with a limit of 40 might have its lights timed to 30.

          And yes, city planners have a headache of it all - allow a bicycle lane here, mess up traffic there, roadwork forcing diversions, etc. Illegal parkers and pickup/dropoffs don't help, either.

          Elevators are easy - when making decisions, you have all the information ahead of who - who's calling for an elevator, and which floors the elevator must stop at. Some more intelligent systems may even schedule elevators by requesting that those who call an elevator enter in their destination floor as well.

        • by tconnors (91126) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @10:54PM (#42165245) Homepage Journal

          I sure wish cities would hire guys like you to work on their traffic lights.

          Yep, the hick that designed your traffic light sequencing system obviously didn't have years of training required to work with a highly complex distributed system:
          http://xkcd.com/277/ [xkcd.com]

      • by TheLink (130905) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @06:45AM (#42160307) Journal

        You have to take into account for car locations, direction, speed, where car and hall calls are locatedand have to figure in such things as door times to calculate which car can service a hall call soonest.

        I wished more elevators took into account how full they were. There's no point having a full or near full elevator serving external requests. A full elevator should only do internal requests. An elevator might guess how full it is by the load it is carrying, or even whether anyone got in for a previous request (door opened but nobody got in- load stayed the same and is high, but the request button was pressed again soon after the door closed - which normally means there was someone there but he/she did not go in despite wanting an elevator).

        Nice to have but not so important would be a standardized way to cancel requests.

        Nowadays I think some elevators are on "least energy used" and not "fastest service" at least based on the way they seem to behave...

        • Mitsubishi elevators do that, using a camera and image recognition to see how packed the car is.

          They also optimized the door opening and movement sequence a lot. In newer ones if you watch carefully the doors close fairly quickly, then right at the last moment slow down and gently shut so that any trapped fingers won't be harmed. At the same time the car also starts moving and you can see the floor outside rising/falling. It only saves maybe two seconds but in a busy building with many floors that makes a big difference.

          They also make high speed escalators, and escalators that only run when people are using them and roll to a halt when not needed.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:04PM (#42156269)

    I expect the job has its ups and downs just like any other.

  • by dryriver (1010635) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:04PM (#42156273)
    I'm guessing that the hardest part of the job is writing code that does not crash, possibly leaving elevator riders stranded between floors, or going up when they want to go down. Over the years Otis must have developed a pretty good elevator usage simulator that plays through millions of possible elevator use scenarios, and tries to find one that either crashes or confuses the system. If yes, the developers responsible for that "possibility simulator" should have been named in the article alongside "The Elevator Algorithm Lady". They should have gotten some credit where credit is due...
  • by GoodNewsJimDotCom (2244874) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:05PM (#42156279)
    If(weight in elevator if(almost every floor pressed)
    {
    emit_audio_tone("Hey kid cut that out, people's lives might be at stake because you're playing in a place you shouldn't be playing.");
    call_security("Kid pressed all the elevator floor again, go embarrass him to his parents.");
    clear_all_floor_buttons();
    }
  • Mathematician? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by hawguy (1600213) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:05PM (#42156287)

    Was a mathematician really needed for this job:

    During the recent $550 million upgrade of the Empire State Building, Ms. Christy was asked whether she could help get more people up to the observation deck. She said she couldn't get more people into a car but could move them up more quickly. So she increased the elevators' speed by 20%, to 20 feet per second. Now the cars can rise 80 floors in about 48 seconds, 10 seconds faster than before.

    Isn't making the elevator go faster a job for an engineer? Does one really need to be a mathematician to know that a faster elevator moves people faster?

    • by MachDelta (704883) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:14PM (#42156355)

      Should be a CS job, really. All you need to do is modify the speed-up loop. [thedailywtf.com]

    • by Hognoxious (631665) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:15PM (#42156359) Homepage Journal

      It might be one of those weird things where the faster it's going the longer it takes to come to a stop, so going faster makes sense if there are calls from fewer floors but not if someone wants to board at every one. Or something.

    • Re:Mathematician? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Samantha Wright (1324923) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:19PM (#42156397) Homepage Journal

      A professor once described to me an elevator system at his former place of employment that used machine learning to try and anticipate where the elevator should be when not in use. At the start of the day, for example, the elevators should rest on the ground floor, so that they can collect people going up; similarly, toward the end of the day, they should rest at the top, since the overwhelming majority of people would be going down.

      In a real-world setting you may have other phenomena that actually need to be learned, such as different groups taking lunches at set times of day, large meetings that cause several floors to congregate on one, et cetera. This problem can be considered from several different angles within ML; either as a regression problem or classification, for example.

      Speed also needs to be optimized not just based upon the desire to reach the destination quickly, but also considering the rate at which the mechanisms will wear out, the energy consumption caused by more rapid movement, and to encourage people to use the stairs.

      Given the potential complexity of how many parameters and models can potentially be considered... yeah, you want someone with a serious background in applied optimization, statistics, or artificial intelligence.

      • by dugjohnson (920519) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:46PM (#42156543) Homepage
        But can she program A Happy Vertical People Transporter?
        http://hitchhikersguidetoearth.wikia.com/wiki/Sirius_Cybernetics_Corporation [wikia.com]
      • by waveclaw (43274) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @06:05PM (#42156985) Homepage Journal

        A professor once described to me an elevator system at his former place of employment that used machine learning to try and anticipate where the elevator should be when not in use.

        I wonder how a machine learning program deals with the 10 year old who thinks it is funny to press every single floor button then get off on a random stop. Usually when at least half the building's population is running 5 minutes late for their flight.

      • Re:Mathematician? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by samkass (174571) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @06:06PM (#42156989) Homepage Journal

        One fairly new building in south Manhattan has a system where you type the number you want to go to before entering the elevator waiting area, and it tells you what door to wait in front of. When the elevator arrives it lists the floors it will stop at. It seems to optimize for minimal elevator usage, minimal wait times, no overcrowding, etc. Once the elevator system has a little more information it can do a lot better.

    • by Florian Weimer (88405) <fw@deneb.enyo.de> on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:45PM (#42156531) Homepage

      Isn't making the elevator go faster a job for an engineer? Does one really need to be a mathematician to know that a faster elevator moves people faster?

      If the elevator can make stops along the way, it probably refers to mean travel time, and it's an entirely different problem.

      That being said, the "surfboard feature" is really, really, old. A lot of elevators have on-demand overrides which prevent intermediate stops. So the article might just be an infomercial for the elevator company after all.

    • Re:Mathematician? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Idarubicin (579475) <.moc.liamtoh. .ta. .teiuqslla.> on Saturday December 01, 2012 @06:08PM (#42157007) Journal

      Isn't making the elevator go faster a job for an engineer? Does one really need to be a mathematician to know that a faster elevator moves people faster?

      I suspect that the problem here is a failure on the part of the article writer. The author was probably just looking for any sort of answer to 'What's the most famous building you've ever done any work for?', rather than 'what's the most mathematically-interesting part of your job?'

      It's also possible that there's a little bit of complexity being glossed over here. For the Empire State Building, visitors take up to three consecutive elevator rides to get to the observation decks: one to get up to the 80th floor, another from 80 to 86 and the main observation deck (though the hearty can take the stairs), and an optional, extra-charge trip from 86 up to the topmost observation area on 102. Visitors form queues for tickets, security, and each elevator ride (both up and down).

      While speeding up any of the elevators might seem like a good thing, it runs the risk of causing crowding and bunching of passengers waiting for the now-overloaded next stage. Making one set of elevators faster could increase wear and tear on those elevators (and increase both energy use and passenger discomfort) without improving overall throughput; I can see how there might be some serious mathematical optimization going on there. As well, it's possible that our mathematician was involved in optimizing all of the building's elevator speeds and timings, and not just the elevators dedicated to observation deck service: a much more difficult optimization problem.

    • by CBravo (35450) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @03:04AM (#42159735)
      It is actually a complex system if you want the ride to be as nice as possible. You want the g-force to be limited as wel as the jerk (time derivative of g-force which is what rocks you stomach) to get a nice fast ride. Without passengers you can use a different speed function which would be too uncomfortable for them. You might want to factor minimizing wear and tear in the function depending on the time of day.
    • by drolli (522659) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @08:59AM (#42160639) Journal

      The engineer knows how to make the elevator faster.

      The mathematician knows how to make it move it less for the same result.

      If both work together the effects multiply, since they are completely orthogonal.

      As some physicist who converted to building control and analysis systems, i find it surprising how much mathematics you need to analyze the optimum point for control. It is even more amazing how complicated it is to predict the outcome of an investment, given different control strategies.

      As it turns out, the biggest problem is the user. How much elevator movement could be saved if there would be a accepted way of informing the user that at certain times of the day they have to walk one stair down, but have a short waiting time? If you could inform them that accepting 18degree Celsius of room temperature instead of 20 for 2h would save a significant amount of heating cost? How can you increase the acceptance of (seemingly odd) decisions of the building control system? What kind of invasion of the privacy would users accept, in comparison to the positive savings of motion sensors in offices?

      No, actually if you want to describe these things statistically (instead of trying to negotiate all of these things with the users), you need a mathematician, who will try to pack user behavior in distributions, correlations, and optimize for a given objective.

  • by Ossifer (703813) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:44PM (#42156529)

    ... say "I feel like I get paid to play videogames." That basically says "please cut my salary by $30,000.00"...

  • by fahrbot-bot (874524) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @04:52PM (#42156563)
    ... when elevators can move in more than one plane: 10 PRINT CHR$ (205.5 + RND (1)); : GOTO 10
    • by girlintraining (1395911) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @11:08PM (#42158683)

      ... when elevators can move in more than one plane: 10 PRINT CHR$ (205.5 + RND (1)); : GOTO 10

      I tried using an elevator based on that once. It took me all over the place, and gave the appearance of doing so intelligently, but I never actually managed to arrive where I wanted to be. I eventually caved and shelled out the money for a proper Wonkavator; Haven't had a problem since, except for the occasional child disappearing while using it.

      • by fahrbot-bot (874524) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @02:57AM (#42159723)

        ... when elevators can move in more than one plane: 10 PRINT CHR$ (205.5 + RND (1)); : GOTO 10

        I tried using an elevator based on that once. It took me all over the place, and gave the appearance of doing so intelligently, but I never actually managed to arrive where I wanted to be.

        Yes. Many a day I used the stairs.

        I eventually caved and shelled out the money for a proper Wonkavator; Haven't had a problem since, except for the occasional child disappearing while using it.

        So there's an up-side.

        P.S. Let me know when you finish your training, girl, and we'll talk... :-)

  • by loufoque (1400831) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @05:16PM (#42156697)

    What do you mean improve the score?
    You mean the programmers aren't even capable of solving the problem of finding the best solution?

    Even if it's NP-complete, it's not like there are so many elevators that you can't find the best solution in reasonable time.

  • by cellocgw (617879) <cellocgw.gmail@com> on Saturday December 01, 2012 @05:52PM (#42156905) Journal

    one certain Aerosmith song on it.

  • by jimicus (737525) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @06:08PM (#42157001)

    Rumour has it that Otis have (or at least had) a UK office in the town of Reading (for our American cousins, the town is pronounced "Redding").

    Their receptionist answered the phone with "Hello, Otis Reading?"

  • by Richy_T (111409) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @06:10PM (#42157025) Homepage

    Multiple forced door closings when people hold the door open to chat.

    Second most needed optimization:

    Give me an ETA so I know when I'd be better off taking the stairs.

    Most annoying feature that needs to be removed (some elevators):

    If you'd manually hold the door for someone (those door open buttons are hard to find in a hurry sometimes. I believe there's even a paper on it), the door would then close v_e_r_y s_l_o_w_l_y while beeping reproachfully at you. The last thing I need first thing in the morning is passive-aggressiveness from a machine.

  • Yes but.... (Score:5, Funny)

    by guruevi (827432) <{eb.ebucgnikoms} {ta} {ive}> on Saturday December 01, 2012 @07:11PM (#42157433) Homepage

    Does it also simulate who farted?

  • by DiSKiLLeR (17651) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @07:12PM (#42157435) Homepage Journal

    I don't think there's any intelligent code running the elevators in my building.

    I live in a 14 floor apartment building. I frequently come home in the evenings to see both elevators just chilling idle on the 14th floor....

    It makes me want tear my hair out.

    The elevators in the high rises I work in don't seem to have these problems. The building I specificlaly work in most of the time has 6 elevators though so its less of an issue though.

    • by the_rajah (749499) * on Saturday December 01, 2012 @07:36PM (#42157591) Homepage
      Yes, pre-microprocessor, relay logic elevator controllers. I see lots of them that were put in 40+ years ago still working and doing their job after all these years.
    • by PCM2 (4486) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @10:12PM (#42158465) Homepage

      I don't think there's any intelligent code running the elevators in my building.

      I live in a 14 floor apartment building. I frequently come home in the evenings to see both elevators just chilling idle on the 14th floor....

      Does your building have any security? Maybe the policy is for the elevators to idle at the top floor after dark so that people coming in will have to hang around the lobby a certain amount of time before getting into the elevator?

      Or maybe it's been determined that in a residential building, more people tend to be at home at nighttime than in during the day, which means that at night, residents are more likely to enter the elevator on a floor higher than the first floor, which means it's more efficient to have the elevator idle on a higher floor? And maybe they decided to make the idle floor the top floor because the people on the top floor are paying more rent?

      I don't know how "intelligent" the elevators necessarily are, but it seems impossible that there's no kind of logic behind how they operate.

  • by Grieviant (1598761) * on Saturday December 01, 2012 @07:39PM (#42157603)

    I'd like to hear her comments on people that press the up and down buttons when they simply want to go down. It irritates the hell out of me because I believe this practice increases the average travel time for people already on the elevator as well as the impatient double-button-pusher himself.

    For example, say someone on floor 6 (who wants to go to the ground floor) presses both buttons and then gets on while the elevator is on its way up. The extra delay caused by the unnecessary stop at floor 6 means, statistically speaking, that people on floors 7 and up will have more time to summon the elevator before it reaches its highest floor and eventually descends to floor 6 again on its way to the bottom.

    When the double-button-pusher issues their goofy "Oh, I'll just get on for the ride ... " comment, I frown menacingly and stare at them for the duration of the trip.

  • by rklrkl (554527) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @09:35PM (#42158281) Homepage

    The lift (UK speak for elevator) I have at work is reasonably sensible - there's only 4 floors in the building, so it tends to keep one lift on the ground floor and one on the 4th floor when idle. However, I had a few fun things happen:

    * All the lights went out in the lift as I was travelling in it, but it did get to the right floor and open the door.
    * The computerised voice announced "floor five" one day, which is creepy when I got off at the top (4th) floor!
    * The lift voice frequently says "please mind the doors" and then does nothing for 5 seconds before repeating the phrase again and only then begins closing the doors! Other times, it'll start closing the doors as soon you press the button and half-way through the closing it then pipes up "please mind the doors".
    * I've had the alarm test for the building go while I've been in the lift and the voice announced "fireman has taken control of the lift and it's returning to the ground floor", which at least it duly did.

    I think the only thing I would say is regularly unpleasant is that the lifts we have are quite small and I suspect several of our staff avoid them because of claustrophobia (it's easy to avoid them if there's only 4 floors of course).

  • by russotto (537200) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @10:00PM (#42158411) Journal

    The elevators in my building are user-hostile. Door closing delays set so short that if the first person isn't fast, they'll close after the stream of people leave but before the first person enters. And while they won't actually cut you in half (that I know of), they will give you a bruise if you go in while they're closing. One elevator goes both up and down from the lobby but has no indicator for which way it's going. The annoying door beeper has no delay; it beeps whenever anyone is in the doorway. They frequently break down. All in all, exactly what you'd expect from NYC elevators.

    Which brings me to my ideal retirement job. I'd love to maintain the software.... for escalators.

  • by Culture20 (968837) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @10:14PM (#42158469)
    Elevator pseudocode is the heart of many a CS course. And CS courses were promised to be devoid of practical application.
    • Re:Noooooo! (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 01, 2012 @10:44PM (#42158585)

      Elevator pseudocode is the heart of many a CS course. And CS courses were promised to be devoid of practical application.

      Little known fact--if you are on a moving elevator and start to force the doors open, it will stop in between floors. Just don't try to get out when the elevator floor is high enough above a building floor that the shaft is exposed. How do I know? In the words of my roommate, I was shafted, literally -- fell into the shaft on the 14th and caught my self on the cables level with the 11th floor doors. My partner (in elevator hacking) quickly ran down the three flights of stairs, I was able to swing over, release the door catch and he opened the doors so I could swing out of the shaft...

      As I was falling, my partner claims that he shouted "Nooooooo!", but I never heard him, I guess my reflexes were too busy getting a grip on the control cables?

  • by Fencepost (107992) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @10:20PM (#42158489) Journal
    Another constraint that she may be considering is power efficiency - there may be tradeoffs between minimal wait time, etc. and power consumption, and the electricity cost for lifting an elevator car many times a day is not going to be negligible.
  • by FRiC (416091) on Saturday December 01, 2012 @10:53PM (#42158611) Homepage

    They need to release some kind of upgrade for existing elevators. At my office building of 35 floors with Otis elevators. When an elevator is already stopped at a certain floor. Instead of opening the door immediately when you press a button, the elevator leaves immediately and you need to wait forever for another elevator to arrive since the other elevators think you've already left. The solution is then to press both up and down buttons, irritating the hell out of every one in the building.

  • by Chewbacon (797801) on Sunday December 02, 2012 @11:14AM (#42161165)
    They're made by Otis and their decision making is horrible. I'm on the third floor and I've seen the car come from the basement when there's two closer to me. On occasion there's one on the same floor!

"Freedom is still the most radical idea of all." -- Nathaniel Branden

Working...