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Google Wades Further Into Hardware With "Nexus Call Center" 58

Posted by timothy
from the jes-a-simple-country-search-engine dept.
An anonymous reader writes with this bit from geek.com: "One of the big complaints surrounding the Nexus 7 launch was the lack of customer support when dealing with the device. Google was not initially prepared to handle the volume of users that required support, which led to an increase in wait time for callers who needed solutions. However, we've recently received word from a source that now Google is using a third party company to staff a call center for the release of the next Nexus devices." Maybe Google needs to out itself as a "devices and services company," too.
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Google Wades Further Into Hardware With "Nexus Call Center"

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    Maybe if Google allowed free rotation between portrait and landscape, most of those calls would be alleviated.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Maybe if Google allowed free rotation between portrait and landscape, most of those calls would be alleviated.

      If you are talking about the Nexus 7, it does. The device is by default in a locked orientation. Just swipe down from the top and click the lock icon with the two arrows rotating around it.

      • by tooyoung (853621)
        Yes, and that is what the call center people can explain to all of the everyday people who can't figure that out.
    • Latest update has it. Some places have it OTA, I just grabbed the zip and flashed it from CWM.
    • It's really becoming quite clear what Google's strategy is now... They're trying to establish a monopoly over all communication, so that they have data on every word going in every direction. They've already pretty much got all internet traffic at some point passing through their sites... They're working on getting all communication done on phones through, and at the same time, now trying to work in all communication going through all phone networks.

      Pretty scary stuff.

    • by DragonTHC (208439)

      Ultimate Rotation Control [google.com] is the app I use.

      It's highly configurable and just works.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    No exceptions.

    If you want to provide good support, you train well paid, dedicated staff with a high retention rate.

    Otherwise claiming that you support your products is just a very expensive PR stunt.

    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      Nearly no one uses internal call centers. The costs are just to high for a resource that sees high seasonal need changes and lots of idle resources since it can be very bursty.

      • Really... so what. That's part of doing business.

        The OP is right... the way outsourcing works it's virtually a P.R. stunt. You might as well hire McDonald's employees away (and give them no training) and keep the jobs in the country. The quality will be the same.

        • by h4rr4r (612664)

          The reality is a third party call center with multiple clients can do a better and cheaper job. Their agents are talking more calls per hour and doing a better job than some fresh hire at a company that looks at call centers as just another cost.

          I am not talking about foreign call centers. I mean outsourcing inside the USA.

          • by Abreu (173023)

            Whatever man, lots of those "american" call centers have main offices in the USA, with maybe 100 agents and 200 managers. The other 1500 phone agents and 100 managers are split into branch offices in India, Mexico and possibly Ireland. Since call-center jobs are highly seasonal, agents are trained to handle different products and switched from one line to the other constantly.

            A lot of times you don't notice, because contrary to popular opinion, a well trained call center agent can fake an american accent pr

          • by evilviper (135110)

            The reality is a third party call center with multiple clients can do a better and cheaper job.

            That's not inherently true at all. "multiple clients" is just one method to get economies of scale and try to keep your employees sufficiently busy.

            I know from experience an on-site call center can in-fact be CHEAPER than any of the call center outsourcing providers, (with perhaps the exception of meeting peak demand, if applicable) while also being more effective.

            Their agents are talking more calls per hour and

    • by hawguy (1600213) on Thursday October 11, 2012 @11:06AM (#41619515)

      No exceptions.

      If you want to provide good support, you train well paid, dedicated staff with a high retention rate.

      Otherwise claiming that you support your products is just a very expensive PR stunt.

      There are differing qualities of outsourced call centers. My company needed a build a 10 seat call center staffed 6am-midnight localtime to handle reservations and questions, we had several known peaks throughout the year where we'd have to double the staff to handle special events. We ended up outsourcing the whole thing to an airline call center that also does outsourcing (our product was a travel product so it was a natural fit). They dedicated 6 lead agents to us, we flew them to our location so they could learn about our product, then we did on site training at the call center for an additional 20 agents that would be floaters that were assigned to us as-needed. One of our staff members went-onsite during the first 2 weeks to help them take calls. answer questions, and build out their knowledge base of frequently asked questions, then we always had local staff on-call so the contact center lead could call with questions.

      Worked well, few callers knew that our call center was not "local". And while their service was not "cheap" when you compare their per-hour rate to what we'd pay a local agent, overall, we paid about half what we would have to run our own call center (and had nearly unlimited capacity to handle calls). Since they had the ability to dynamically size the pool of agents that took calls for our product, we only had 6 dedicated agents, where if we had a local call center we would have had to have 15 or more dedicated agents to handle normal call volume (we'd at least 2 shifts to handle the 18 hour day), with more during peak periods.

      We got consistently positive feedback on our call center, and I really think that outsourcing let us provide a better experience than if we tried to build it in house.

      • by evilviper (135110)

        We got consistently positive feedback on our call center, and I really think that outsourcing let us provide a better experience than if we tried to build it in house.

        I just can't help but wonder, what if the company (airline) who put together the call-center you're outsourcing to, had thought the same thing as you... In some ways "it's turtles all the way down!"

        • by swillden (191260)

          We got consistently positive feedback on our call center, and I really think that outsourcing let us provide a better experience than if we tried to build it in house.

          I just can't help but wonder, what if the company (airline) who put together the call-center you're outsourcing to, had thought the same thing as you... In some ways "it's turtles all the way down!"

          They did think the same thing, which is why they started selling their services to other companies. It's just a different angle on exactly the same recognition: It's very costly to build a call center capable of handling the peaks of a single organization's support traffic, because it means you're hugely overstaffed a lot of the time. The solution is to have the call center support more organizations, with different call volume patterns. Ideally, to take on the support load of organizations with complem

  • wading further into hardware? You mean by planning and preparing for the release by ensuring there is adequate support for the anticipated customers? The title gives the impression that we should expect a piece of equipment that allows us to establish a centralized call center for our own businesses...not that Google has outsourced their phone support. -1 for Misleading
    • by sunking2 (521698)
      No kidding. The whole article talks about Android, not a lick about "Hardware". This really should highlighting about how Google may actually be taking it's software seriously and offering some sort of support for it. They've really allowed for quite a support mess and user confusion thanks to the many versions of Android out there among the various vendors.
  • >> Google Wades Further Into Hardware

    This headline only makes sense if you're talking about a company that's not already neck-deep in cell phones.

    • by Fwipp (1473271)

      But they provide support for very few of those cell phones - only the ones they sell directly, correct? There's a large difference between working with a manufacturer to provide software and supporting customer service for hardware units.

    • Google has a history of making stuff and then totally ignoring the support costs for it. I thought they learned this lesson with the Nexus 1
  • It's my understanding that many large companies don't host their own call centers. There's one in my building that has some quite large clients who could easily host their own if they wanted, but they still outsource it.
    • It's a great idea, because then you have all the cost and expense of maintaining a call center, but you still manage to alienate your customers who cotton-on pretty quickly that the "call center" they're calling doesn't really give a f--- about whatever it is you need and is unable to help you except for a subset of common problems some engineer had an opportunity to create scripts for.

      Wait.

      Did I say it was a great idea? Sorry, I meant stupid idea. I _always_ get those two words mixed up.

      • It is an instant alienation for a certain percentage of people.

        You should of heard this redneck wail in Lowes the other day when the customer service desk said he needed to call Lowes customer support about a refund problem. He didn't want to call no a-rabs.

      • by Abreu (173023)

        Actually, a lot of call center services compete on quality of service.

        A client will drop you like a hot potato and switch to another call center if your quality of service is not good enough, and nowadays most good call center contractors have penalization clauses that fine them for every BBB complaint or even for every lost customer.

        Sure, some clients will want to pay as little as possible, and they end up with the more seedy suppliers who, in turn, pay peanuts to their agents, resulting in high rotation a

        • A client will drop you like a hot potato and switch to another call center if your quality of service is not good enough, and nowadays most good call center contractors have penalization clauses that fine them for every BBB complaint or even for every lost customer.

          So why do they continue to suck then?

          • by Abreu (173023)

            You are quoting the first part of my comment, but seemed to missed the second part, which answers your question.

    • by fermion (181285)
      It depends on the value and the worth to the company. The problem google had was not that it could not handle the volume of calls, but that it has little to no end use support experience so there resources were not apparently in place at all. As a corporation it needs to gain direct experience supporting end users which is not going to happen if it outsources to Islamabad.

      In a not outsourced call center, there is at least the possibility of some being able to talk to a principle face to face for clarifi

  • by chinton (151403) <[moc.liamg] [ta] [todhsals-100notnihc]> on Thursday October 11, 2012 @10:39AM (#41619209) Journal
    Do Androids Compute on Electric Tablets?
  • Its got more memory than the Nexus 6... But whose memory does it have?
    • by mjwx (966435)

      Its got more memory than the Nexus 6... But whose memory does it have?

      Aside from the planned obsolescence, the Nexus 6 was a killer.

  • It's a great tablet, but, the screen cracked when I pushed the power button and rendered the touchscreen inoperative, currently ASUS is telling me that any screen damage resulting from use is not covered under warranty.

    Here's a video of the damage:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3-nbnPyZYM [youtube.com]

  • I dunno...devices and services look awfully bulky compared to HP's tablet strategy of devices and fuck it. That worked out a lot cheaper, lol.

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