Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Hardware

Qubits Stored at Room Temp For Two Seconds 88

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the get-em-while-they're-warm dept.
nmpost writes with news of another step toward practical quantum computers. From the article: "Scientists have successfully overcome one of the obstacles in quantum computation by storing data on quantum bits (qubits) for about two seconds at room temperature. Many of the current systems utilize extremely complex and costly equipments to trap an individual electron or atom in a vacuum at absolute zero temperature. However, a team of researchers from Harvard University have solved the problem of working at normal temperature by using diamonds, which are atomically pure materials on Earth."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Qubits Stored at Room Temp For Two Seconds

Comments Filter:
  • Absolute zero (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 04, 2012 @11:58AM (#40542139)

    Many of the current systems utilize extremely complex and costly equipments to trap an individual electron or atom in a vacuum at absolute zero temperature

    No they don't. Really. They don't. Trust me on this.

    • Re:Absolute zero (Score:5, Informative)

      by HarrySquatter (1698416) on Wednesday July 04, 2012 @12:01PM (#40542177)

      That's because "Technorati" horribly mangled what the original Harvard Gazette article said which was:

      Most current systems, by comparison, rely on complex and expensive equipment designed to trap a single atom or electron in a vacuum and then cool the entire system to close to absolute zero.

      • by Shavano (2541114)

        That's because "Technorati" horribly mangled what the original Harvard Gazette article said which was:

        Most current systems, by comparison, rely on complex and expensive equipment designed to trap a single atom or electron in a vacuum and then cool the entire system to close to absolute zero.

        "Atomically pure" diamonds are of course, cheap and more readily available than synthetically grown silicon...

        • I'm sure you can use industrial diamonds for this.

          • by Gr8Apes (679165)
            Or artificial diamonds, but they're still more expensive than real diamonds, last I heard, but I don't know how much of that is due to PR by the diamond industry.
  • What's a cubit?
  • by Anonymous Coward

    as opposed to neptune where they're considered quite slutty?

  • Who gives a shit? There are lots of atomically pure materials.

    • by HarrySquatter (1698416) on Wednesday July 04, 2012 @12:04PM (#40542201)

      Whoever wrote the Technorati article that the submitter quoted (most likely the same person) seems to be unable to form basic English sentences. The original article just states:

      A group of Harvard scientists, led by Professor of Physics Mikhail Lukin and including graduate students Georg Kucsko and Peter Maurer and postdoctoral researcher Christian Latta, say they’ve cracked the problem, and they did it by turning to one of the purest materials on Earth: diamonds.

      Apparently the person writing the Technorati article was trying to insert words in to make himself sound smarter and failing at it.

      • by avandesande (143899) on Wednesday July 04, 2012 @12:11PM (#40542255) Journal

        Actually diamonds are probably one of the less pure materials, because there is no way to refine them like you can with elements that can be zone refined such as silicon. Buckyballs can be refined by fractional crystalization... etc etc.

        Impurities are locked into diamonds.

        • by DanZ23 (901353)

          Lab made diamonds are pretty damn pure.

          • I believe you on that but you would be surprised at how many nines they get out of some important industrial materials.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by gregski (765387)

          from the harvard gazette article:

          "In initial experiments, the team used diamonds that contained 99 percent carbon-12 atoms"

          "Working with researchers at Element Six, a British-based company that specializes in manufacturing artificial diamonds, they developed a new technique to create crystals that were even more pure: 99.99 percent carbon-12."

          • Only 99.99% pure? If they think that's pure they should talk with the semicon guys. 99.999999% pure (before doping) is common in electronics.
  • by nightfell (2480334) on Wednesday July 04, 2012 @12:13PM (#40542269)

    Two seconds? Sheesh, I can usually at least make it home before my new computer is obsolete.

  • Apologies... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Qubit (100461) on Wednesday July 04, 2012 @12:18PM (#40542291) Homepage Journal

    ...I have ADD and can only retain information for... ..wait, what were we talking about? It's Independence Day today, right? Let's go set off some fireworks!

  • I've heard of diamonds before, but I was never aware that they were found on Earth!

  • Using diamonds instead of costly equipment?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Using diamonds instead of costly equipment?

      Yeah a lot of people are ignorant about this and that suits the DeBeers family just fine.

      Diamond is not really so rare. It's just that the DeBeers family has a 80%+ monopoly on the world's diamond mines. They artificially restrict the supply to raise the costs and the perceived value. Of course the diamond cutters have a specialized skill and want their profits as well.

      They do sell diamonds that are not considered gem-quality at realistic prices though. They are sometimes called industrial diamond

  • Must be costly indeed when using diamonds is the cheaper alternative. :)

  • Excellent! (Score:4, Funny)

    by meta-monkey (321000) on Wednesday July 04, 2012 @01:26PM (#40542899) Journal
    Diamonds instead of costly equipment? Excellent! This will pair well with my Faberge egg-powered processor.
    • by l0ungeb0y (442022)

      You do know that there are other sorts of diamonds than the pricy rocks sold by DeBeers don't you? Industrial grade diamonds are quite cheap and there are ways now to create diamonds even more perfect that the priciest ornamental gem artificially.

      And if you read the article you might have run across this tidbit

      "Using a pair of impurities in ultra-pure, laboratory-grown diamonds..."

      Oh snap!

  • Thats nothing. I once ate a qubit.

  • "stored at room temperature for 2 seconds"

    Room temperature can vary a lot. If your a/c isn't working due to power outage it could be 48C on a day like today and if your heat isn't working in the winter it could be -28C

  • given that DRAMs only store a bit reliably for milliseconds yet are the most common electronic storage.

  • Finally some practical application that may be used to justify the artificial cost of diamonds.

  • ..that does something a regular computer cannot do - and some demonstration of that any time soon?

    (d-wave has nice pr and all.. but wtf does it actually do? have they done practical demonstrations that display an advantage? )

  • van chuyen hang di My, Uc, chau Au, Phap, Anh, Duc, Nhat, Canada, Han Quoc, Sin gia re Marilink Logistics chuyen giao nhan hang hoa Quoc Te, van chuyen quoc te, van tai quoc te bang Duong Bien va Hang Khong den cac quoc gia tren the gioi voi gia ca canh tranh nhat. Lien he: www.vanchuyenhangdimy.com
  • Reminds me of another quantum storage device...

    The old Quantum Bigfoot hard drives could generally be trusted to keep your data intact for about 2 seconds as well.
    • by tehcyder (746570)

      Reminds me of another quantum storage device... The old Quantum Bigfoot hard drives could generally be trusted to keep your data intact for about 2 seconds as well.

      They weren't very good, but they were cheap.

      • I worked in computer repair when those drives were common. They would drop the partition table and appear as new, unformatted drives regularly. Humorously you could power them on/off 3-4 times and they'd generally pick the table back up and boot normally. Not particularly reassuring.

EARTH smog | bricks AIR -- mud -- FIRE soda water | tequila WATER

Working...