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Electronics Prototyping Plate Kit Board For Raspberry Pi Coming Soon 74

Posted by samzenpus
from the if-you-build-it-they-will-prototype dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Outside of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, it seems work is being done to support the tiny PC with add-ons. One of the companies set to launch such a product is Adafruit, which has just announced an electronics plate kit for the device. The kit is currently in the prototype stages, but once released Adafruit is hoping to encourage people to use the board to prototype electronic circuits and create some embedded computer projects. It's certainly an idea that will excite those coming to the Raspberry Pi who have experience with Arduino."
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Electronics Prototyping Plate Kit Board For Raspberry Pi Coming Soon

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  • by JoeMerchant (803320) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @10:22AM (#39837391) Homepage

    O.K. - this is a selfish request for info I'm too lazy to look up for myself...

    What's the ETA and source for direct connect digital camera support? I know there's USB support through the standard Linux stack, but there's that tantalizing little camera port on the Pi that gets mentioned every so often.

    Will it support multiple cameras?

    Will it support higher bandwidth than USB?

    Will it have any decent general purpose driver support?

    Is it just a phantom port like the one on the Beagle/Panda boards where there's not actually any camera on the market that connects to it?

    My future four-eyed autonomous rover wants to know!

    • by stereoroid (234317) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @11:51AM (#39837825) Homepage Journal

      You can attach just about anything to the I2C & data busses - ADCs, DACs, controllers ... and cameras. Search for "I2C camera" for examples,

    • by Nyder (754090)

      O.K. - this is a selfish request for info I'm too lazy to look up for myself...

      What's the ETA and source for direct connect digital camera support? I know there's USB support through the standard Linux stack, but there's that tantalizing little camera port on the Pi that gets mentioned every so often.

      Will it support multiple cameras?

      Will it support higher bandwidth than USB?

      Will it have any decent general purpose driver support?

      Is it just a phantom port like the one on the Beagle/Panda boards where there's not actually any camera on the market that connects to it?

      My future four-eyed autonomous rover wants to know!

      It will have all that when you stop being lazy and start programming it.

      fucking slackers.

      • I guess it would help if I had one, still waiting on mine...
      • Ordered mine on "release day"... still waiting for delivery. Not much in the mood to do research for a piece of (presently, from my perspective) vapourware. Perhaps a lucky person who can actually work with the things already has the answer.

    • by psergiu (67614)

      > What's the ETA and source for direct connect digital camera support? I know there's USB support through the standard Linux stack, but there's that tantalizing little camera port on the Pi that gets mentioned every so often.

      Summer-Fall 2012, after production of Models A, B & cases are in full swing (according to the Foundation)

      > Will it support multiple cameras?

      AFAIK only one.

      > Will it support higher bandwidth than USB?

      5 or 8 Mpixel camera module, 1080p recording.

      > Will it have any decent g

      • Cool, thanks for the summary. I've seen a couple of things on the RPi forums in the past, but nothing definitive.

    • by tlhIngan (30335)

      O.K. - this is a selfish request for info I'm too lazy to look up for myself...

      What's the ETA and source for direct connect digital camera support? I know there's USB support through the standard Linux stack, but there's that tantalizing little camera port on the Pi that gets mentioned every so often.

      Will it support multiple cameras?

      Will it support higher bandwidth than USB?

      Will it have any decent general purpose driver support?

      Is it just a phantom port like the one on the Beagle/Panda boards where there's

  • by niftydude (1745144) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @10:35AM (#39837443)
    It's a pretty annoying oversight that the rpi board doesn't have any holes for mounting screws, so you'd hope that an add-on plate like this might correct that oversight.

    But nope.
    • Perhaps in the future they can spin a larger board (at a ~$5 premium) that includes mounting holes? No re-design required apart from repaneling. Of course, they have connectors coming off from every side, so the mounting holes are going to be making connectors sink in from the edges....

      I'm sure it was a decision for smaller cheaper boards, not an oversight. (smaller boards == more boards per panel == cheaper)

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Can't it just clip into a plastic case? Thereby reducing the wasted space on the board for screws.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Easily solved with a small drill bit and itsy-bitsy bolts. This is a DIY product after all.

    • by trjonescp (954259)

      It wasn't an oversight - it was a design decision to meet their price target. Mounting holes take up a surprising amount of PCB routing real estate (and through every single layer of the board) and PCB real estate costs money. That's just how budget constrained this concept is.

    • by psergiu (67614)

      Official & unofficial cases will be produced which will held the board in place using slots or clips.
      The official recommendation for DIY mounting is: http://sugru.com/ [sugru.com]

    • by ThePeices (635180)

      Real Engineers use duct tape.

    • by gr8_phk (621180)

      It's a pretty annoying oversight that the rpi board doesn't have any holes for mounting screws, so you'd hope that an add-on plate like this might correct that oversight.

      Yep Arduino has similar issues. While it has mounting holes, they didn't use proper keep-outs around them. One hole has a connector so close the threads of a screw would touch it - the screw head has no hope. Other holes have parts too close, but not as bad. All the holes are too close to the edge of the board. Also, the LEDs are in the mi

  • by Anonymous Coward
    Seriously, why the hell is there so much shit on /. about the Rasberry Pi? It's like this is their personal advertisement space already.
    • Re: (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      So you enjoy paying hundreds of dollars to big corporations for every little gadget you want, padding their profit margins and encouraging the slave farms in third world countries where they manufacture them? RPi is a symbol that this shit isn't rocket science and within the ability of many people to do things for themselves for about the cost of you and someone else having a meal and drinks at Buffalo Wild Wings. You don't think that's worthy of discussion?
      • by CrankyFool (680025) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @01:04PM (#39838209)

        You know that the RPi is also manufactured in a third world country, likely in what looks like the other "slave farms" which manufacture electronics, right? They abandoned plans to produce it in the UK.

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        So you enjoy paying hundreds of dollars to big corporations for every little gadget you want, padding their profit margins and encouraging the slave farms in third world countries where they manufacture them? RPi is a symbol that this shit isn't rocket science and within the ability of many people to do things for themselves for about the cost of you and someone else having a meal and drinks at Buffalo Wild Wings. You don't think that's worthy of discussion?

        RPi would be a symbol of that if it essentially wasn't "hey we get these socs from here and have this another company do the boards and assemble them and then these bunch of other companies to sell the thing".

        and isn't this a dupe anyways? I'm pretty sure I saw this adafruit post already(and there's another similar breakout board product going on somewhere else).

    • Yes, get this geeky crap of Slashdot, we want more stories about Ron Paul and the TSA!
      • Yes, get this geeky crap of Slashdot, we want more stories about Ron Paul and the TSA!

        How efficient would a beowulf cluster of RPis be at mining Bitcoin?

        • by rthille (8526)

          Well, since we can't get low-level docs on the GPU from Broadcom, not very.

  • by mseeger (40923) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @10:49AM (#39837501)

    It would be nice being able to purchase a Raspberry Pi instead of only "registering your interest".

    I hate seeing a product hyped in the media, when it is not available. The Raspberry Pi has the potential of being a game changer. Until now, it's only press announcements from my POV.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I've got one on order, delivery date is 7th May for me. Loads of people have them already, it's just they're already sold out and as soon as the resellers get them in they're being shipped straight back out.
      I registered with Farnell *and* RS on day one. Only Farnell actually let me put down a pre-order on day one, RS was, and still is, just "registering interest".

      • by Anonymous Coward

        700 people (As RS electronics said in their mail) is not loads. If that's loads, then Linux had "loads" of users in 1991.

        • by Anonymous Coward

          RS only took 700 orders because they only had 700 boards.

          Farnell took every order that came in, even if they couldn't ship, and has reported around 100k will ship by the end of June with another 100k shipping by the end of July.

    • Hear hear!!! I've searched extensively, hoping mabbe some stock would turn up, but to no avail. Sure seems like a fun dream ,get back to us when there is some available.
    • by psergiu (67614)

      If you were too lazy to face the DDoS on February 29, you have to wait. It took me one hour of refreshing, swearing and entering my address & CC number again & again in that morning but i managed to order one. I will receive-it next week.
      Shame you got such a low UID and no RPi ... :-)

      • by mseeger (40923)

        Thanks for the encouragement pal ;-).

        Availibility means for me "With Amazon Prime in my home the next day" and not "Line up with 500 people through the night to have a shot at one of 10 pieces" or "Pressing 2.500 times F5".

        I don't buy thinks for their rarity but to use them ;-).

        On the count of being lazy: guilty as charged your honor.

    • by KenSeymour (81018)

      I ordered one from element 14 / Newark here in the US. Judging from the forum, production is ramping up and I wanted to get in line because interest is also
      ramping up.

      It was back ordered, of course, but I should have a delivery date in a week or two.

      It was cheap enough, I could risk waiting until September if that's how long it takes to get to the front of the line.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    I was looking yesterday if some company expanding a little on Raspberry Pi. Add LCD, serial ports, connection for WiFi boards and you are on par with many dev boards and SBCs that are sold for hundreds of $$. Put it in a case that leaves room inside for Z-Wave or Zigbee radio boards and you got a product. Anybody saw things like that?

    If it's not based off Raspberry this is fine too. Cisco built gateways http://www.wirelessgoodness.com/tag/tes301/ but I didn't see pricing or any venues to buy these. Any sugg

    • by itsdapead (734413) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @04:02PM (#39839153)

      I was looking yesterday if some company expanding a little on Raspberry Pi. Add LCD, serial ports, connection for WiFi boards and you are on par with many dev boards and SBCs that are sold for hundreds of $$.

      ...except that will start pushing up the price, which is the Pi's way of grabbing attention.

      Let's face it, there is nothing particularly revolutionary, hardware-wise, about the Pi. The important thing is that its so cheap that people will buy it first, and find out what it can do for them later. This is harking back to the days when the British PC market was dominated by British-designed machines like the BBC Model B - which the Pi makers invoke - and the Sinclair Spectrum/ZX81 which are actually more obviously relevant to the Pi because they were incredibly cheap. Actually, the BBC Micro was also incredibly cheap compared with the (inflated) UK price of an Apple II (the sensible comparison - the BBC ended up occupying the same niche in the UK that the Apple II did in the US), but it wasn't as affordable as the ZXs.

      A more realistic way of teaching kids to program is to use Scratch, Python or (insert language of choice) on a regular desktop or a tablet - sandboxing it as a web app or a virtual machine if you worry about kids "breaking" things. You have to provide PSU, monitor, keyboard mouse, network to use a Pi, and there are other reasons for getting regular PCs or tablets onto kid's desks. However, if the Pi can generate interest by appealing to the ZX81 spirit then what's not to like?

      The fly in the ointment is that its simply not economical to actually make the things in the UK.

      • by psergiu (67614) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @04:40PM (#39839325)

        > A more realistic way of teaching kids to program is to use Scratch, Python or (insert language of choice) on a regular desktop or a tablet - sandboxing it as a web app or a virtual machine if you worry about kids "breaking" things.

        99% of the parents owning a PC would not be able to do this for their kid. Even if they did, there's nothing preventing the kid to delete daddy's documents or install a trojan from some flash games site.
        A RPi is bulled-proof. The kid messed up ? Reflash the SD card using a card reader and a one-click application (which is being developed by the people on the RPi forums).

        • by itsdapead (734413)

          99% of the parents owning a PC would not be able to do this for their kid.

          99% of kids who are motivated to learn programming at home could show their parents exactly what to do.

          Scratch is cloud-based: just make sure that your net-nanny software lets junior to get at the Scratch website. If kids can get at Facebook, Wikipedia or their school intranet, they can get at Scratch (or any cloud-based programming environment anybody wants to set up).

          A "Virtual Pi" system would be as simple as (1) install VirtualBox, (2) install a "virtual appliance" containing an x86 version of the Pi

          • by psergiu (67614)

            You seem to be a techie who never had to deal with NORMAL PEOPLE - the 99% - who count being able to log into Yahoo webmail & Facebook as major technical acomplishments.
            I'm a techie, i managed to teach my dad how to read emails, but for sending them, he still has to call me.
            And you're talking about VirtualBox.

            Also, most of the kids today have NO IDEA that a computer can be programmed to do your bidding and do more that web, boring office stuff & games and there's no one to tell them this.

            • by tlhIngan (30335)

              Also, most of the kids today have NO IDEA that a computer can be programmed to do your bidding and do more that web, boring office stuff & games and there's no one to tell them this.

              And how many kids CARE that they can make computers do more? We tech geeks love to think that the public must love computers when they're buying it up by the truckload, but the reality is a computer is something required in day-to-day life. They don't care how it works, what makes it work, etc.

              Take say, a mechanic - he fixes

            • by itsdapead (734413)

              You seem to be a techie who never had to deal with NORMAL PEOPLE - the 99% - who count being able to log into Yahoo webmail & Facebook as major technical acomplishments..

              I've certainly dealt with such people and know exactly how much hand-holding they need to to simple things. Yet somehow you're expecting people who can't log in to a website to re-flash a Raspberry Pi instead? If you can make that click-n-drool, you can produce an equally click-and-drool installer for a virtual machine. Most would run a mile as soon as they saw the current Pi and convince themselves that they'd wreck the TV by plugging it in.

          • by hackula (2596247)
            Last time I checked (volunteered teaching kids to program last year), Scratch was not cloud based. There is a website that has some featured programs, but the platform runs on a local machine with local files and all.
            • by itsdapead (734413)

              Last time I checked (volunteered teaching kids to program last year), Scratch was not cloud based. There is a website that has some featured programs, but the platform runs on a local machine with local files and all.

              Sorry, you're right, I misremembered. Anyway, Scratch works fine on a regular PC, and its bizzare to argue that people who can't install (or trust their kids to install) an application can somehow set up (or trust their kids to set up) a bare board Linux computer.

  • by DrogMan (708650) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @12:09PM (#39837917) Homepage
    They're a bit late then. There are already several kits out there - both breadboard and protoboard with solder holes in them. Get with the times!

    Try this: http://shop.ciseco.co.uk/slice-of-pi/ [ciseco.co.uk]

    Or this: http://www.skpang.co.uk/catalog/raspberry-pi-cover-with-breadboard-area-red-p-1071.html [skpang.co.uk]

    etc. I currently have the SKPang one for my Pi.

    • ... This is the era of marketing, not the era of innovation (e.g., people talking of Arduino instead of Atmel, Raspberry Pi instead of Broadcom, etc.)
    • I don't know about those other shops, but any kit I've gotten from adafruit has been top-shelf with good examples/docs, etc.

      Just look at all those nice terminal blocks for I/O.

  • by Osgeld (1900440) on Sunday April 29, 2012 @02:23PM (#39838653)

    you made a perfboard

    • you made a perfboard

      Well someone has to.

      You do understand such things to do not magically appear in shops.. Right?

  • Because every story about it, ever, has used those words.
  • They'll probably be able to release this months before my Raspberry Pi finally ships!

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