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Intel Hardware

Ivy Bridge Running Hotter Than Intel's Last-gen CPU 182

Posted by Soulskill
from the water-under-the-bridge dept.
crookedvulture writes "The launch of Intel's Ivy Bridge CPUs made headlines earlier this week, but the next-gen processor's story is still being told. When overclocked, Ivy Bridge runs as much as 20C hotter than its Sandy Bridge predecessor at the same speed, despite the fact that the two chips have comparable power consumption. There are several reasons for these toasty tendencies. The new 22-nm process used to fabricate the CPU produces a smaller die with less surface area to dissipate heat. Intel has changed the thermal interface material between the CPU die and its heat spreader. Ivy also requires a much bigger step up in voltage to hit the same speeds as Sandy Bridge."
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Ivy Bridge Running Hotter Than Intel's Last-gen CPU

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  • Speed? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by cbreak (1575875) on Saturday April 28, 2012 @11:57AM (#39832097)

    Ivy also requires a much bigger step up in voltage to hit the same speeds as Sandy Bridge.

    I get the feeling that they have very weird notions about what constitutes CPU Speed...

  • by ganjaganja (2031696) on Saturday April 28, 2012 @12:04PM (#39832151)
    Not all of us do overclocking. Subject is misleading.
  • by spire3661 (1038968) on Saturday April 28, 2012 @01:18PM (#39832563) Journal
    Overclocking had its day back when the Celeron 300A was out. Now its all poseurs OCing to get a few more framerates and burning out their CPUs. Very VERY few of them OC it for anything more then penis. Sure you'll get some folding guys or dudes running triple 4k monitors. When I OC'd back in the day it was so i could MOVE faster in Quake 3, not so i could post benchmarks. Overclocking should be used to reach a performance level you couldn't otherwise get with money.
  • by Mattsson (105422) on Saturday April 28, 2012 @01:41PM (#39832723) Homepage Journal

    Also, if a large part of the reason why the Ivy Bridge CPU runs hotter is the smaller area of the chip and the changed thermal interface materials, this means that while the new CPU chip might run hotter than the previous one, it doesn't put out more heat.
    The CPU is hotter but the heat sink is cooler since the energy can't be transferred from the chip to the heat sink fast enough.
    If this is the case, then Intel need to do something about the CPU package before going to higher frequencies.
    It also means that people needing the extra heat in their cold rooms would be disappointed since the heat output would be lower, not higher. ;-)

  • This is a Feature (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Sarusa (104047) on Saturday April 28, 2012 @05:48PM (#39833781)

    It's hotter when overclocked. Overclockers love having to run pipes and submerge things. How are you going to justify hauling out the liquid nitrogen if it's running cool?

    Meanwhile everyone else is happier that it runs cooler, takes less power, is faster, and even costs less than Sandy Bridge.

    This is Win Win, people.

  • by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968@gma i l . com> on Saturday April 28, 2012 @06:42PM (#39833955) Journal
    They aren't talking about using thermal paste on the actual heatsink friend, they are talking about using thermal paste between the actual chip itself and the INSIDE of the heatsink which you then personally use whatever compound you wish. You see this is why i don't believe TFA because all of those rumors have so far been based on engineering samples which are just that, some samples of an unfinished chip given to reviewers. i just can't see a company as successful as Intel hobbling their latest chips by using some dirt cheap thermal paste at the critical juncture between the actual die and the heatsink just to save a few pennies.

Theory is gray, but the golden tree of life is green. -- Goethe

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