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Google Drive Launching Next Week With 5GB Free Space 265

Posted by Soulskill
from the not-their-autonomous-car-project dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Next Web is reporting that Google Drive, the search giant's long anticipated cloud storage service, is set to launch next week. From the article: 'What's interesting though is that Google is planning to start everyone with 5 GB of storage. Of course you can buy more, but that trumps Dropbox's 2 GB that is included with every account. Dropbox does make it easy to get more space, including 23 GB of potential upgrades for HTC users. What's also interesting is the wording related to how the system will work. It's been long-thought that Windows integration will come easy, but that getting the Google Drive icon into the Mac a la Dropbox would be a bit harder. From what we're reading, Google Drive will work "in desktop folders" on both Mac and Windows machines, which still leaves the operation question unanswered.'"
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Google Drive Launching Next Week With 5GB Free Space

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  • Google Drive (Score:5, Insightful)

    by StevenBielberg (2619195) on Monday April 16, 2012 @05:49PM (#39704631)
    There are two large, very real problems with Google Drive. For starters Google has a long history of abandoning projects after they fail to gain users on them. This would be a huge problem with cloud storage like Google Drive.

    I also fail to see why this would get any good amount of users even if Google did advertise it correctly - unlike their search engine, gmail and youtube, cloud storage is nothing new. There are tons of companies offering their services with ridiculously low profit margins. Hell, most of them are free for home users, and I really wouldn't trust Google with my company or work data - I would use a professional hosting service with SLA and company that has no need to mine my data.

    Lastly, but even more so importantly, putting everything for Google to datamine and crawl is just stupid. They already know so much - hell, they track Slashdot too. On top of that Google has serious problem with anti-competition regulators and this is just going to make those issues worse when Dropbox and other companies will demand Google to stop leveraging their search engine against them. They already have this problem in other markets.
    • Re:Google Drive (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 16, 2012 @05:54PM (#39704671)

      >> unlike their search engine, gmail and youtube, cloud storage is nothing new.

      Because email was a new phenomenon when Gmail launched?

      • by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:28PM (#39705057)
        Gmail offered 1gb of mail storage per user while the competition offered something like 2mb. For Google Drive to be equally impressive, I'd expect them to offer 1.25tb of cloud storage per user. :P
        • Re:Google Drive (Score:4, Informative)

          by StevenBielberg (2619195) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:31PM (#39705083)
          In fact even Microsoft's offering, SkyDrive, is currently offering 25GB for free. Google is seriously lagging behind in this.
          • I know, I found it interesting that TFA doesn't mention this. As a live account user, I don't see this big deal of this announcement.
          • by zaimoglu (2485836) on Tuesday April 17, 2012 @01:31AM (#39707779)
            Microsoft has got it all wrong with the SkyDrive. Firstly, there are TWO DIFFERENT services: (1) SkyDrive gives you 25GB of free cloud space but WITHOUT synchronization capabilities, so you need to manually keep track of your files, (2) a synchronization service that goes by the name of Live SkyDrive or LiveMesh, with only 5GB space. This second service is the one that can truly be compared to Dropbox. The problems with SkyDrive are not limited to this mind boggling confusion. The 25GB service does not allow you to upload folders. You MUST manually create your folders and only then can you upload your files, though you can select more than one file at this stage. Microsoft really expects you to carefully examine your directory tree and create folders manually!
    • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Insightful)

      by fph il quozientatore (971015) on Monday April 16, 2012 @05:54PM (#39704685) Homepage

      I also fail to see why this would get any good amount of users even if Google did advertise it correctly - unlike their search engine, gmail and youtube, cloud storage is nothing new. There are tons of companies offering their services with ridiculously low profit margins. Hell, most of them are free for home users, and I really wouldn't trust Google with my company or work data [...] Lastly, but even more so importantly, putting everything for Google to datamine and crawl is just stupid. They

      Yeah, and for the same reasons their e-mail service never caught on.

      • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Insightful)

        by StevenBielberg (2619195) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:00PM (#39704743)
        Gmail was done remarkably better and offered much larger storage than their competitors. Yet, Gmail still didn't win Hotmail or Yahoo which to date are the two largest email providers on planet.

        However, it doesn't seem like this is the case with Google Drive. It actually looks like they don't bring anything new or innovative to the table either, and in fact, might have a worse service than Dropbox and other companies have (not even having good software for OS X or Linux). They also don't offer that much more space either.

        The cloud storage landscape and internet in 2012 is vastly different from email and Gmail when it launched.
        • Re:Google Drive (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:11PM (#39704909)

          Email is not storage. Users don't want a new email address. That's why hotmail and yahoo still exist at all.

          • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Informative)

            by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:23PM (#39705009)
            You must be pretty young to not remember a time when someone might have had to actually delete messages before they received new ones because they ran out of storage in their inbox. We're talking services that offered like 2mb for storage. Then Google came around and offered an entire gigabyte, promising to never have to worry about your inbox capacity again. This absolutely caused many people to switch to gmail. When hotmail and others realized this, they followed suit and started upping their mailbox capacity to match gmail's.
          • Email definitely is storage. You don't want to keep deleting your emails all the time. You most likely also want to search through your old emails. With other free services of the time you would have to keep deleting them constantly as otherwise the message box got full and you didn't get new emails.
            • by Galestar (1473827)
              You missed the point. To change storage providers you don't have to make sure 100 different websites use your new "address" - like an email address or a phone number. <whoosh>
          • Re:Google Drive (Score:4, Informative)

            by Urza9814 (883915) on Monday April 16, 2012 @08:54PM (#39706379)

            My Gmail account is currently using 2.5 GIGS. Before Gmail existed, the largest mailbox capacity that existed (as far as I know) was Fastmail, with 10 megs, with 1-2mb being common (hotmail, yahoo, aol, etc). I would generally overflow those in 6 months to a year. Granted, a lot of my gmail emails I could do without. Others -- hell, I still have attachments of hundreds of kilobytes, sometimes even megabytes, from five years ago that I pull up occasionally. For me at least, Gmail's storage capacity revolutionized email. 'email it to yourself' or even 'email it to me' was not a feasible way to transfer or store files until Gmail (Gmail was also the first, and still one of the few, providers to allow large attachments. Most providers still limit it to 10 megs, while Gmail is 20. Your guess is as good as mine as to what the limit was with a 2 meg inbox.) The search helps a lot too, though that's obviously related -- no need for search it if you can't store it. I'm a lot more likely to remember that I got a PDF of that two semesters ago from Ms. xyz than I am to remember where the hell I stored that file. Plus I've gone through four or five computers since getting Gmail, so files that I can currently just grab out of my email would have otherwise been scattered across six or seven hard drives.

            Yes, users don't want a new email address. That's why I love gmail. In the two years before gmail launched the situation with email storage was really getting to be a problem, due to increasing internet speed and file sizes. I think I went through four email accounts in those two years. Some of that was due to storage, some due to spam (When gmail launched there was no comparison with the spam filters. They're still among the best. Went from a dozen or so spams a day to less than one a month) So...I went from changing addresses every six months to having the same address for about eight years now. The desire to keep one constant email address is exactly why Gmail was so popular. Maybe not for people like my father, who's STILL on hotmail, but for people who use email heavily that was certainly a large part of the motivation.

            • by Sporkinum (655143)

              I don't trust Google, so I only use it as a spam catcher and for work voicemail transcribed.
              Using 159 MB of your 7701 MB

              I wouldn't trust them for storage as well, unless I encrypted everything before storing it.

              I am still using my same ISP for email for the last 11 years. If my imap gets full, I down load and archive it locally.

        • by Lumpy (12016)

          "Yet, Gmail still didn't win Hotmail or Yahoo which to date are the two largest email providers on planet."
          Yet, Yahoo and Hotmail still didn't win AOL users which to date still has a huge number of users.

          Yes, they do. It makes most tech people weep, but I meet someone in business weekly that has a @AOL address.

        • by Inda (580031)
          I'll tell you what Google bring to the table:

          The name of Google.

          I tried to get my family on Dropbox. I even offered to answer all their surveys and upload video data in order to get another 5gb. The family needed a way to send large files and Dropbox, with it's Android integration, was the answer. They couldn't arsed and still burn CDRs for people. We have 50mbit/5mbit in this house. *facepalm*.

          Google can offer 5gb from Google with a simple single click from a Google webpage like Google Play.
      • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Interesting)

        by demonbug (309515) on Monday April 16, 2012 @07:20PM (#39705581) Journal

        I also fail to see why this would get any good amount of users even if Google did advertise it correctly - unlike their search engine, gmail and youtube, cloud storage is nothing new. There are tons of companies offering their services with ridiculously low profit margins. Hell, most of them are free for home users, and I really wouldn't trust Google with my company or work data [...] Lastly, but even more so importantly, putting everything for Google to datamine and crawl is just stupid. They

        Yeah, and for the same reasons their e-mail service never caught on.

        Speaking of Gmail, currently it says I have 7.7 GB of free storage there. Can't they at least match this with their new Cloud drive? I already use Gmail for temporary storage all the time - just attach files to draft emails and I can access them from anywhere.

      • Yeah, and for the same reasons their e-mail service never caught on.

        Or their calendar, their docs, their OS, their phones, or their social med... nevermind, got carried away there.

    • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Insightful)

      by pushing-robot (1037830) on Monday April 16, 2012 @05:57PM (#39704711)

      It's probably targeting Apple's iCloud. It's nice to be able to tell developers "Here's a place to store data. It will automatically be backed up and synchronized between the user's devices. You won't have to run your own servers and get the user to trust you with their data. You won't even have to ask the user for special credentials or get them to sign up for Dropbox or anything like that. It just works."

    • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Insightful)

      by icebraining (1313345) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:10PM (#39704897) Homepage

      Lastly, but even more so importantly, putting everything for Google to datamine and crawl is just stupid.

      The advantage of a dumb data store is that you can layer some encryption transparently. Even something simple like putting a password on a RAR file is enough to prevent such snooping.

      That said, I probably wouldn't use it for anything important anyway.

      • I already use Gmail as a dumb (limited) data store. With encryption.
      • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Informative)

        by darkmeridian (119044) <william.chuang@g ... com minus distro> on Monday April 16, 2012 @09:41PM (#39706663) Homepage

        I use TrueCrypt on my Dropbox to make a secure volume that I just drop my stuff into. It's annoying to have to log in and stuff but it's still worth it for the added security.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by djhertz (322457)

          I was doing truecrypt but didn't like the extra steps to open a file, dump stuff in, etc. I gave boxcryptor http://www.boxcryptor.com/ [boxcryptor.com] a whirl and have been very happy with it. It adds on right to dropbox. It's free (up to 2 gig of encryption) and a one time fee for unlimited. I tried spider oak too but didn't like how it all worked and I'm not a fan of re-occuring costs.

      • by arth1 (260657)

        I think it could be a useful backup for /dev/random
        Right now I use an USB key for that (no, really, I do), but it would be nice to have a larger entropy pool I can read from anywhere. If it didn't require a Google account and accepting tracking cookies in my browser, that is.

        Of course, if everybody used it for this, Google would probably close the service, as compression and dedup would end up consuming extra space instead of saving space.

    • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Interesting)

      by shutdown -p now (807394) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:12PM (#39704923) Journal

      The attraction of cloud storage for end users is integration with other services - think iCloud. Google already has cloud storage for music, which is pretty neat because you can stream directly from it on any Android device (and optionally precache some files locally, while still having auto-sync etc). They also have a separate cloud storage for photos - PicasaWeb - also integrated with Android gallery, as well as G+. Then there are Google Docs. Perhaps they figured that it's long overdue for them to aggregate all those services together in a single solution, like Apple did with iCloud.

      • Yeah, I use Google Apps (don't knock it--good business-class SLA that secures my data, Device Management, etc.) and Google Connect syncs all of my documents onto Google Docs transparently from Microsoft Word. Imagine just saving all my files on there directly. Hmmmm..... Even more points if it saves versioning. That would make me not use Microsoft SharePoint.

    • Google has a long history of abandoning projects after they fail to gain users on them...
      Or simply deciding to allocate resources elsewhere when ( Squirrel! ) some other technology looks more interesting to some 20-something with the title of "Manager"

      • by jockm (233372)

        Its almost like you are saying Google is a business or something. Anything you don't run an manage yourself can disappear at any time*. It's about calculated risk. If the service is useful, then I will use it. I never use any kind of cloud storage to keep data I don't back up elsewhere, and neither should you.

        But if you aren't going to use something because it might go away, well that just about describes everything. I am glad Google is getting more focused, trying things and then getting rid of them i

    • by steelfood (895457)

      Truecrypt. It's not completely secure since they probably have copies of your container elsewhere they can use to do a bitwise comparison against. But it's more work for them to decrypt than plaintext, and practically necessitates a determined attacker.

      Assuming they don't already securely encrypt your data during transit and in storage.

    • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Insightful)

      by DragonWriter (970822) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:21PM (#39704991)

      There are two large, very real problems with Google Drive. For starters Google has a long history of abandoning projects after they fail to gain users on them. This would be a huge problem with cloud storage like Google Drive.

      Insofar as that is true, that history includes doing so with a long warning before cutting off access and with quite good support for outbound migration, so I don't see why it would be much of a rational concern. Further, the kind of cloud storage user interface being provided is a pretty trivial layer on top of the cloud storage backend that underlies many other Google services that its a pretty low risk of it being discontinued.

      I also fail to see why this would get any good amount of users even if Google did advertise it correctly - unlike their search engine, gmail and youtube, cloud storage is nothing new.

      Neither web search engines, web-based email, or web-based video hosting were anything new when Google's search engine, Gmail, or YouTube (which wasn't Google's when it was introduced) were introduced. Nevertheless, each managed to do quite well.

      Free-to-start, generous quota, and zero-effort (or close to it) signup if you already have a Google Account, by themselves, will get them some users. Actually having some interesting distinguishing features compared to other cloud storage providers would obviously be important to getting substantially more users. The most obvious opportunity I see for Google here is integration with Google Docs.

      Lastly, but even more so importantly, putting everything for Google to datamine and crawl is just stupid.

      How?

      They already know so much - hell, they track Slashdot too.

      Tracking slashdot may be evidence of inefficient use of resources, but its hardly an argument in support of "they know too much!" scaremongering.

      On top of that Google has serious problem with anti-competition regulators and this is just going to make those issues worse when Dropbox and other companies will demand Google to stop leveraging their search engine against them.

      Well, it might cause problems in that regard, if there was evidence that Google was illegally leveraging anything against competitors in the cloud storage space. Then again, as I discuss below, it probably wouldn't even then.

      They already have this problem in other markets.

      Winning in two different markets to the extent where established players in one feel that its worth their effort to complain that you are leveraging your market position in one to dominate the other is the exact opposite of a "problem" for the firm that is in that position.

      It might lead to a problem if you actually were doing something that was likely to produce a signficant restraining action from some government, but as many other firms have demonstrated (notably Microsoft in the software market), even actually illegally leveraging a monopoly in one market to monopolize another rarely results in any remedy that is either timely enough to make any substantial impact on the utility of the action, or significant enough to outweigh the benefits you gain from doing it.

    • by Korin43 (881732)

      There are two large, very real problems with Google Drive. For starters Google has a long history of abandoning projects after they fail to gain users on them. This would be a huge problem with cloud storage like Google Drive.

      They do tend to give you quite a bit of notice though. It may be a hassle, but it's not like it's impossible to download your stuff and upload it somewhere else.

    • by PopeRatzo (965947)

      There are two large, very real problems with Google Drive. For starters Google has a long history of abandoning projects after they fail to gain users on them. This would be a huge problem with cloud storage like Google Drive.

      How would it be a "huge problem" if Google should abandon this cloud-storage? It's only 5gig, after all, and they give away 4gig flash drives in boxes of cereal (practically).

      The only reason I'd use it is to allow me to access files from anywhere, the way I use dropbox now. I would n

      • I use Dropbox as a backup system - part of a rational, multi component program. The Dropbox data is on every machine I have the account on (three currently), so that's different local stores - one at home, one at work, one in my backpack, one in the cloud. Personal info is encrypted in sparseimages - I could use truecrypt as well if I really wanted a multi platform solution.

        It doesn't backup everything - my terabyte collection of pictures and video is backed up locally using a NAS and external drives - b

    • Re:Google Drive (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Charliemopps (1157495) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:43PM (#39705221)
      I don't necessarily disagree with your arguments but I'd like to offer arguments to each:

      1. Googles target audience is not the corporate user. It's people at home that want to backup photos and such. These people will probobly have a google account, a dropbox account, etc... etc.. The more places you can backup your data the better. If Google drops the product, oh well.

      2. I don' think this needs a "Good amount of users" Much like microsoft, Google wants to offer you every option. They don't want to force you to use another companies product simply because they don't offer a "google version" The biggest threat that Google would ever face would be a company offering something they do not, and then that something becoming ubiquitous enough that the rival company could offer the same service that Google does and kill off their business (see facebook)

      3. Google, like every other corporation on earth, doesn't give a shit about anti-competition regulation. They can, just like Apple, Microsoft, and everyone else, just ignore it... then, when sued, draw out the court battle so long that the companies in question will die long before any litigation is resolved. Even if they do not, the fines levied are almost always so small they are a joke. If I get a speeding ticket, the fine is about 3 days pay for me. How about when a buisness gets a fine they get a similar fine... 3days gross income. Well, that's another topic.
    • by hairyfeet (841228)

      I'd say the first of those two is the big "Uh oh" with Google drive, after all you could always encrypt your stuff before you sent it. But as we have seen with Google its either a megahit or its dead, there really is no in between with that company so i would be seriously leery of wanting to store my stuff with them until I saw whether or not its gonna last.

      Of course all of these cloud storage bunches that aren't targeting businesses is gonna end up screwed anyway as it looks like the ISPs are just gonna

      • by repvik (96666)

        Do you think Google will yank the service without providing people ample warning? It's storage. It's most likely pretty darn easy to download your files and upload them somewhere else.

    • Serious problems with anti-competitive regulators, or serious problems from a lot of sore losers whining through their lobbyists and media? I have yet to hear a good explanation for how google is being anti-competitive. Mail, search, maps, adsense... I can't think of a single thing they do that there isn't healthy competition going on.

      The closest thing I've heard is whining about how they won't release their methods for ranking pages, and the only people that seem to be whining about that are SEOs who
    • by errandum (2014454)

      You fail to consider that this service might have something different. Most google services did not innovate, search was already there, e-mail was already there, even calendars were already there. And then google gave you more value for free (or for data). Some might dislike that, I know I don't...

      5gb is already a step in the right direction. But I'm thinking that integration with other google services (for example, douments -> docs, files to e-mail in an instant, etc).

      If you have sensitive files, this s

  • Privacy? (Score:2, Informative)

    by AmiMoJo (196126)

    Even Dropbox do some encryption, less than perfect though it may be... AFAIK Google don't scan your docs for data like they do with emails. How will it work with your private files?

    • Re:Privacy? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Calos (2281322) on Monday April 16, 2012 @05:56PM (#39704705)

      Dropbox has encryption, but Dropbox has all the keys. If you're worried about your privacy from the party offering the service, you can't give Dropbox a pass.

      I think Ars ran an article about a service recently which uses better encryption. Or you can just encrypt your own files before uploading, or use TrueCrypt.

      • Re:Privacy? (Score:5, Informative)

        by Calos (2281322) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:05PM (#39704829)

        This [arstechnica.com] is that Ars article.

      • If you're worried about your privacy from the party offering the service, you can't give Dropbox a pass.

        Like you noted, you use TrueCrypt or similar. This is even a suggested solution by Dropbox team and it's a valid one, because you should never trust third party provider with your encryption.

        However, at least Dropbox does more encryption on the data and actually stores it in encrypted form, even if they are able to obtain the keys. This is still vastly better than just using HTTPS or other "secure" connection between the client and server but still saving it unencrypted. On top of that HTTPS etc are subje

      • Re:Privacy? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by AmiMoJo (196126) <mojo@@@world3...net> on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:11PM (#39704913) Homepage

        Spideroak lets you keep the keys. Truecrypt will work but does come with two big performance hits. First you have to upload the entire container the first time, after which it should just need differences sending. Unfortunately Windows doesn't allow the client software to know which parts of the file changed via notifications, just that something changed, so it has to scan the entire file. If your container is 1GB then that's scanning 1GB every time you make a change.

      • by gbjbaanb (229885)

        Mozy [mozy.com] allows you to store stuff on their system with a private encryption. they do warn you loads about "if you lose the key, you lose the data". That's a backup solution primarily, but they're working on a 'stash' that is an instant-sync type thing.

      • by dbIII (701233)
        The also have all the clowns. If you want to be private from anybody at all you shouldn't use a service like dropbox which has already had an incident where all files were open to anybody on the internet that could guess your username (ie. no authentication at all in that incident). Even at it's best you can't revoke access once you've given it yet it give the illusion that you can. Those losers mucked things up so badly that even plain FTP is more secure - that's a truly epic fail.
    • Re:Privacy? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by olsmeister (1488789) on Monday April 16, 2012 @05:59PM (#39704729)
      Put a TrueCrypt partition on the drive. Encryption needs to be done at the ends; they are just providing a bit storage medium.
    • Re:Privacy? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Cow Jones (615566) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:21PM (#39704989)
      • If you're looking for privacy, don't store sensitive data in the cloud.
      • If you have to, avoid companies which have an obvious interest in your connections, your data, and your profile.
      • If you need strong transparent client-side encryption, you can either use a TrueCrypt container (like olsmeister mentioned), or use an alternative provider which offers this feature: for example, SpiderOak [spideroak.com] or Wuala [wuala.com]. Dropbox, as you mentioned is not secure, because they hold your keys.
      • Avoid the US and US-based companies for storage of sensitive data. The Patriot Act requires Google to give the DHS access to their servers, even if they are physically located in the EU. Wuala is operated by LaCie, a Swiss company; they guarantee that customer data will always be stored on their servers, which are located in the EU or Switzerland.

      I'm not affiliated with either SpiderOak or LaCie, but we've researched possible cloud storage services last month, and settled on Wuala. So far, no problems.

      • by arth1 (260657)

        Wuala requires java - this is a deal breaker for me.
        Are there any other multiplatform remote storage options that doesn't require non-standard and resource intensive runtime components?

    • If you're worried about the content of your files, for whatever reason, don't store the file(s) in the cloud. Period.

  • WebDAV access? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by DdJ (10790) on Monday April 16, 2012 @05:56PM (#39704703) Homepage Journal

    We'll have to see. If the new "GDrive" can be securely accessed via the open, standard WebDAV protocol, I'll think it's interesting and I'll be an enthusiastic adopter. If not, then it's just another cloud file locker that uses proprietary client software (or a web UI, no good for integration work), which is considerably less interesting.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Why not try the free "hubic" service by OVH. 25GB free.
      I use it to backup my linux box (over webdav).

      • Why not try the free "hubic" service by OVH. 25GB free.
        I use it to backup my linux box (over webdav).

        Interesting. Looks like it needs a dedicated app to access, right ? No folder syncing ? In typical french fashion the whole thing seems monolingual french too. Not a problem for me, but I imagine a lot of Slashdot folks might have difficulty.

  • 5 GB (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Calos (2281322) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:02PM (#39704781)

    Only 5 GB? Anyone else a little surprised by that?

    My gmail accounts have more space than that, and people have been writing browser extensions and apps for a while to leverage that as cloud storage. 5 GB is at the high end of current free offerings (it matches SugarSync and Box), but by no means revolutionary. You'd think Google, with their resources, would be offering a bit more, especially with their late entry into the game. I guess they can push the tie-ins to other services - like being able to send attachments in Gmail straight to your Google cloud storage. But other than that, what's the incentive, especially if already using another service?

    • by Kittenman (971447)

      Only 5 GB? Anyone else a little surprised by that?

      Free. Read my lips. Free. I'm sure they can provide some more space for a little (cough) incentive...

    • Re:5 GB (Score:5, Informative)

      by jader3rd (2222716) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:16PM (#39704961)

      5 GB is at the high end of current free offerings

      SkyDrive is 25 GB and free.

      • by Calos (2281322)

        You're right, I forgot about that (and I even have an account).

        I never did use it though, even when I was running Windows and used a third party app to make the SkyDrive service look like a network drive.

        Have they added any features? Any native clients that do automatic syncing or anything?

        • by jader3rd (2222716)
          If you use Windows Live Mesh you can have a subset of the 25 GB auto sync. I forget if it's 2 GB or 5 GB, though. I don't use the auto sync, so I don't know for sure.
      • by JoeSavage (906113)
        Skydrive has a 100MB limitation per file. Dealbreaker.
        • by tgd (2822)

          Skydrive has a 100MB limitation per file. Dealbreaker.

          Well, thankfully for most people, the files they need to store aren't that big, and that isn't a limitation. Its not a good option for your bookleg movies or porn collection, but 100MB is plenty for photos, documents, etc. A search on my laptop shows basically nothing above that size that isn't an installer, a ZIP containing a bunch of smaller files, or videos that came from either my digital cameras or my HDV video camera.

          Personally, I'd like the ability to store my entire media library up on Skydrive or a

          • Re:5 GB (Score:4, Interesting)

            by swillden (191260) <shawn-ds@willden.org> on Monday April 16, 2012 @09:37PM (#39706641) Homepage Journal

            And I can't but a terabyte and a half of cloud storage from a reputable place at a reasonable price... yet

            I know where you can get about 500 GB for no monthly fee. You just need an always-on server (preferably running *nix) and network connection, and be willing to "trade" storage, storing about 1 TB of other peoples' files (all data is automatically encrypted before upload), using the Tahoe LAFS distributed storage grid. Actually, if you get your own group together you can get as much space as you want, but the grid I'm a member (currently) has a 1 TB maximum. The storage nodes are scattered across several continents and Tahoe applies Reed-Solomon coding to your data so even if many of the servers holding your data were to disappear, you could stil recover all of it.

            If this is interesting, check out our wiki at: http://bigpig.org/twiki/bin/view/Main/WebHome [bigpig.org]

    • Re:5 GB (Score:4, Insightful)

      by flimflammer (956759) on Monday April 16, 2012 @11:48PM (#39707285)

      The reason they give so much extra space for gmail is because most people won't even use a tenth of that space. Hell, I've had a gmail account since the service came out and I think of my like 9 gigs of space they offer, I'm still only like 1% full. I'm a heavy emailer, I just don't often need to send or receive large attachments.

      Google banks on the fact that very few people put lots of data into their emails, even if some people do crazy things like use gmail as a file store, it's still worth it to advertise that amount of space to the masses. It's basically just a marketing ploy. A successful (and useful to end users) ploy, but a marketing ploy none the less.

      However with a file storage service, people are far more inclined to actually utilize the space they are given. For example, I've got 5 gigs of space on Dropbox, and I'm already using 35% of it. Google will be less inclined to provide much more space for free than 5GB because more people are more inclined to actually use that space.

  • And after they scrape all that data watch out for GooglePorn.

    • by rrohbeck (944847)

      The only questions here are
      - Can you easily create an anonymous account and
      - Can you make your files accessible to others?

      • by Nethead (1563)

        Not sure anonymous and Google go together. They may not have your street address, but they know what you fap to.

  • by dryriver (1010635) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:05PM (#39704837)
    Google already collects a huge amount of data on people with its search engine, Youtube (tracking what you watch), Gmail, Maps, Android OS and other services. Now they also want you to store important data on a Google Cloud-Drive? What happens when Google is served with a legal warrant stating that government has a right to access everything of yours that is on Google's servers? Its pretty stunning how much data of yours would become transparent at once: What you search for. What you write in emails. What you watch on Youtube. What you do with your Android tablet. And now also the data you store on Google's cloud-drive... Perhaps this is all by design? You are supposed to trust the Google brand with all your private data, until the day the government comes along, and demands to see years worth of your data, and - crucially - without you even knowing this is happening. For me, Google Cloud-drive is simply too many eggs in one basket. Sure, it could be useful for backing up some not terribly critical data, and then accessing that data from all sorts of different places when you are on the go. My gutfeeling tells me though that Google already knows more than enough about everyone, and that adding your non-internet data to its data collection is a step too far - too far in the wrong direction.
  • Extremely Thin (Score:4, Informative)

    by DakotaSmith (937647) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:06PM (#39704843) Homepage
    I've got 50GB free at Box [box.com] and 30GB free on EchoFS.com [echofs.com]. Why should I care about 5GB? Just because it's Google?
    • by IANAAC (692242)

      I've got 50GB free at Box [box.com] and 30GB free on EchoFS.com [echofs.com]. Why should I care about 5GB? Just because it's Google?

      Hey, I don't know why you've been modded down to oblivion, but thanks for mentioning EchoFS. I'd not heard of it before. It works great with davfs in Linux... something that is pretty difficult to find, at least with this amount of space.

  • rsync.net (Score:5, Insightful)

    by thetoadwarrior (1268702) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:06PM (#39704845) Homepage
    I rather use rsync.net than trust my data to an advertising company.
  • MS SkyDrive (Score:3, Informative)

    by El Rey (61125) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:09PM (#39704881)

    MS SkyDrive is 25GB for free and no hoops to jump through. They don't let you store large files though. Seems like they could do better than 5GB...

    • by Nimey (114278)

      I expect Microsoft can handle giving that because they've got a smaller userbase, and who's really going to use 25GB?

  • I'll be honest, as a wannabe author my backup solution involves storing on multiple computers AND gmailing myself copies as lazy-man incremental backups. I am not exactly sure what I would use a cloud drive for, since I already use gmail(and to a lesser extent docs) that way. One really sweet thing is that it is already integrated into my smart phone as-is, because emails with attachments already work there.

    I think there IS a consumer gap as far as sharing files bigger than an email attachment without
  • G:\ In use. (Score:4, Funny)

    by PlusFiveTroll (754249) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:33PM (#39705123) Homepage

    I already have a G: drive, can we remap it to another drive letter?

  • ... can I migrate my megauploads?

  • The question is... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by joh (27088) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:41PM (#39705185)

    Will Google have native clients for Windows, Linux, OS X, iOS, Android and Symbian that will offer real file system integration?

    Or is that just a web drive you have to up- and download data from?

    I'm asking because I'm using Dropbox in a business environment in which I export a Samba share from a Linux server to Dropbox which gets synced to a bunch of clients on half a dozen of very different devices running on Windows, Mac OS, Linux, Android and iOS and all of this works just fine. Having 5 GB instead of 2 GB for free is not much of an advantage if there is no system integration to speak of and exactly this has always been a problem with Google. Hey, they even have a hard time to get IMAP right.

  • by Tokolosh (1256448) on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:44PM (#39705227)

    Is my data stored in the US?

    Does the US government claim to have jurisdiction over my data? (I think I know the answer to this one).

  • by flogger (524072) <non@nonegiven> on Monday April 16, 2012 @06:53PM (#39705319) Journal
    http://www.viksoe.dk/code/gmail.htm [viksoe.dk] Been in use for a long time... If this is as easy to use as Dropbox and as easy to share as that or as easy as google docs, then sign me up.
  • by Snaller (147050) on Monday April 16, 2012 @07:08PM (#39705447) Journal

    After you have been forcing G+ on everybody I'm never going to use any of your new services.

  • when geocities, freeyellow, angelfire and etc... offering 10mb was plenty.

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