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Is It Time For Hacker Scouts? 186

Posted by Soulskill
from the earn-a-lightsaber-badge dept.
ptorrone writes "MAKE Magazine asks: is it 'Time For Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts 2.0?' What might the future of education be like if it were based on online & earned skill badges, and what could the future of traditional organizations for kids, like the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, be like in a very modern, tech-savvy world? Social networks and the maker movement are the perfect intersection of where the kids of today are, but we don't see 'leaderboards' for skills yet; we only see them for video games. Is it time for Hacker Scouts?"
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Is It Time For Hacker Scouts?

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  • Badges (Score:5, Funny)

    by fph il quozientatore (971015) on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:34PM (#39226931) Homepage
    You got the First Post badge!
    • Re:Badges (Score:5, Funny)

      by sconeu (64226) on Friday March 02, 2012 @08:04PM (#39227211) Homepage Journal

      Badges? We don't got no badges! We don't need no steenkin' badges!

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      /=\ Help an Old Lady Across the Information Superhighway /=\

      "No Gramma don't click the red button... No don't click Confirm, that warning is lying to you."
      "No mom it's in the menu bar. The menu. At the top. Of the screen... Just let me remote in..."
      "Left-click. With the mouse. What? How big is the button? No, use the button on the top of the mouse, not the side."

      I would've earned every damn one of those badges. >_

      • Re:Badges (Score:4, Funny)

        by citizenr (871508) on Saturday March 03, 2012 @06:12AM (#39230051) Homepage

        "No Gramma don't click the red button... No don't click Confirm, that warning is lying to you."
        "No mom it's in the menu bar. The menu. At the top. Of the screen... Just let me remote in..."
        "Left-click. With the mouse. What? How big is the button? No, use the button on the top of the mouse, not the side."

        I used to do that, now that I am over 30 I just tell people they are too stupid to use computers.

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          I used to do that, now that I am over 30 I just tell people they are too stupid to use computers.

          When people demonstrate a lack of basic computer skills, like clicking on buttons, I put them into the self-guided tour that explains how to use the operating system, and walk away.

          Obviously I don't do this when I'm paid to explain these things, but life is too short to teach people how to use a mouse for free.

    • Badger Badger Badger!
  • A Hacker is (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:36PM (#39226945)

    untrustworthy, disloyal, surly,
    angry, rude, mean,
    obstinant, cranky, greedy,
    anonymous, smelly, irreverent

  • Is it time? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by YrWrstNtmr (564987) on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:46PM (#39227001)
    Yes, probably. Let's roll some tech into it.
    But do NOT lose the outdoor aspect. Camping, etc. Far, far too many kids have no clue what the "big green room with the blue and white ceiling" looks and smells like.
    • Re:Is it time? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Hatta (162192) on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:50PM (#39227055) Journal

      The funny thing is, I remember computer camps being common in the 80s. Somehow as computers got more popular, computer camps got less so.

      • Somehow as computers got more popular, computer camps got less so.

        They became appliances. Just like a TV, dishwasher, telephone. It's there in the house, it mostly works, everyone has one. Nothing special.
        • We need more dishwasher camps too.

        • Re:Is it time? (Score:5, Insightful)

          by lightknight (213164) on Friday March 02, 2012 @10:13PM (#39228433) Homepage

          Yes, I've seen that kind of 'appliance' thinking in action.

          That's why we have a weird schism. One generation which bankrupted us and couldn't fix a toaster to save their lives, another which could write a fair number of new OSs but is hamstrung on the financial issue, and another generation immediately thereafter which has acquired both generation's mistakes and understands neither finances nor technology. W00F!

          • One generation which bankrupted us and couldn't fix a toaster to save their lives

            It does amaze me what people throw away.

            The other day I saw one of those clothes drying racks dumped in the street - 3 sections that fold flat for storage, in use they form a Z shape. One of the little plastic hinges was broken.

            My gran had one exactly the same. She'd replaced the broken hinge with a piece of cord braided back & forth so it was bendable but didn't slip. As a kid, I used to undo the braid. Then I learned

      • i loved my summer computer camp. I would hang out all day in that room full of apple IIs. Times were different back then though. There was only one guy in my class who had one at home. I only owned 2 floppies (that i modded to make double sided with a hole punch).
      • by wbr1 (2538558)

        The funny thing is, I remember computer camps being common in the 80s. Somehow as computers got more popular, computer camps got less so.

        That is because those camps were designed to get the geeks like us out of the picture for the summer. Now everyone is a geek.

      • What do you do for power, take a generator with you?

        Nothing better than the thwubbathwubba sound & the and smell of oil when you're trying to commune with nature.

    • But do NOT lose the outdoor aspect. Camping, etc. Far, far too many kids have no clue what the "big green room with the blue and white ceiling" looks and smells like.

      Isn't that what the Occupy movement is for . . . ?

      In the case of cities, especially the smell part.

      • The Occupy movement, among other things, (and I will put this charitably) is decrying the lack of employment; their argument appears to be that it's not for lack of want that they are unemployed, but for lack of employment opportunities that they are so. Which arguably, when tied in with the whole 'Wall St. Bailout' thing kind of make sense, in an interpretation of capitalism (the more perfect version of) -> that is, the capital that was 'acquired' from the taxpayer would have, if it had followed the ini

    • by fifedrum (611338)

      amen, the whole point of scouting is to get out and move and learn to build, fix and strengthen things. There's no way a video game should be part of a badge, unless the scout it writing one.

      I was never a scout, but my son and daughters have been since they were old enough. I've been on many a campout with them, and as they get older, we'll go adventuring out in the big blue room together in canoes, with backpacks, rifles (though no firearms in scouts, so that'll be strictly civilian), sleep under the star

  • There is a coder Scouts, called Coder Dojo http://coderdojo.com/ [coderdojo.com]

    • by ackthpt (218170)

      There is a coder Scouts, called Coder Dojo http://coderdojo.com/ [coderdojo.com]

      Scouts have Explorers. When I was in High School I was in a computer technology/electronics Explorer post. It was rad. First taste of computers, programming and stuff. Not a new idea.

  • Kids need to be outside and learn useful things. The Internet is pretty easy to use, coding and configuring software is best left to teachers or summer camps. The scout programs really need to stick to their guns, don't spoil a good thing. Theyre one of the last bastions of real childhood enrichment.
    • Useful things... let's see, which one might it be in our time and age? How to make fire by rubbing a stick in a board only or how to make efficient SQL statements?

      Don't get me wrong, I'm with you at the "childhood enrichment" part, but useful? Only if you believe the "end of the world at the end of the year" thing.

      • Useful in that it gets kids to think beyond "That's just a stick and a board."

        I was raised on a small dairy farm, so we had to do a lot of our repairs, modifications and fabrication ourselves. Good old wire and bailing twine. :D

        I'm now a science teacher and am constantly surprised when some city (thus, supposedly more advantaged) kids freeze up at the idea of designing their own experiments or equipment. It's anecdotal, but it seems that the kids that have outdoor lives as well as books and computers, a

      • by DarwinSurvivor (1752106) on Friday March 02, 2012 @09:26PM (#39228091)
        I don't know about you, but knowing how to tie knots, set up a tent, use a compass, etc are VERY useful to me, especially since I like camping. And by the way, once you get to the higher levels, your group can actually specialize. For instance, I helped set up an isolated telephone network that spanned multiple kilometers with only a single power source at our last 2 Jamborees. We also set up Internet connections for kids to contact home and for the on-site hospital (no joke) to diagnose problems as well as radio towers and a dispatch room. Pulling cat5 cable through underbrush is a unique experience that few people get.
        • by AK Marc (707885)
          You can teach someone orienteering through an online class with online tests. This isn't about whether to have computer-scouts, but scout-badges-on-computers, which is possible for many badges, and could greatly increase the educational value of the scouting program, but "camping" badges would still be done outdoors.
        • by Osgeld (1900440)

          heh yea, we recently went on a camping trip with some buddies, I was the only one able to figure out how to toss a rope over a branch and string a lantern over it, our site was the only one with a (sterno) stove and a light, everyone else was trying to heat beans in the dark 4 foot away from a piss poor fire

  • by roc97007 (608802) on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:53PM (#39227083) Journal

    ...a book published in 1965 called "the mad scientist's club". The main difference as I see it is that the kids did technical pranks and hardhacks outside in the sun and fresh air, a concept that would probably be considered abnormal now.

    • ...a book published in 1965 called "the mad scientist's club". The main difference as I see it is that the kids did technical pranks and hardhacks outside in the sun and fresh air, a concept that would probably be considered abnormal now.

      I get a nice even tan from my monitors, thank you very much.

    • A regular series from the old days of Popular Electronics magazine. Some of them are available online at:

      http://www.copperwood.com/carlandjerry.htm [copperwood.com]

    • by jackbird (721605)

      Also, one of the first stories in the series involves the kids purchasing a WWII surplus miniature Japanese submarine, making it seaworthy in some way, and doing some kind of prank with it without particularly much in the way of adult supervision.

      The number of government agencies, from municipal to federal, that would freak out completely at the first hint of such an activity in this day and age is amusing and sad to contemplate.

      For further reading, Edward Abbey's "The Monkey-Wrench Gang" is like a sequel i

  • Fine as is (Score:4, Insightful)

    by twnth (575721) on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:55PM (#39227111)

    I do not think it is necessary to reform all organizations to match some illusionary techno elite mold.

    Scouts/Guides teach different skills, like what the sun looks like and how to get along with others, that are not well represented by the can't-lift-face-from-LCD crowd.

    Badges are about basic skills and sense of accomplishment (little milestones met). Leaderboards are about competition. Each has their merit.

    P.S. Get off my lawn

  • I just got the Fry-o-later achievement badge in TF2 today!
  • No (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Hentes (2461350) on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:59PM (#39227153)

    Isn't the point of scouts is to get kids out of the basement to move and do something?

    • by mianne (965568)

      I'd say there's a huge difference between pwning n00bz in WoW for 15 hours a day and intensive hands-on training in AI, robotics, e-commerce, cryptography, rocketry, etc.. We have more than enough kids trained in the former, and so precious few skilled in the latter.

    • by Ihmhi (1206036)

      As a former Scout, I would like to remind you that we spent more than a fair bit of time in our school's gym tying knots, setting up tents, and having pine derby races. And let's not forget about arts and crafts - I still have my paper maché statue doing the Hadouken pose.

  • Not really (Score:5, Insightful)

    by bjdevil66 (583941) on Friday March 02, 2012 @07:59PM (#39227163)

    Yes, the core Scouting organizations could use online resources for organizational purposes or for some merit badges that could be done online.

    However, most of the valuable experiences from scouting can only be gained in person - experiencing things in real life. Camping. Swimming. Hiking. Shooting. Meeting people in various fields and getting a real education about a topic (even if it is cursory), Etc.

    However, online scouting would lose a lot of the value you get by interacting with live people who can share their experiences.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      Hacker scouting should be partly done in hackerspaces for just the reason you suggest. On the other hand, virtual collaboration is a useful skill, too.

  • by RCC42 (1457439) on Friday March 02, 2012 @08:04PM (#39227207)

    I just wanted to mention that the Boys and Girls scouts of America do not allow homosexuals into leadership positions, youth or adult.

    Moreover they completely bar atheists and agnostics from membership of any kind.

    Support them if you so desire but do so with full awareness of what you are supporting.

    • by flaming error (1041742) on Friday March 02, 2012 @08:29PM (#39227495) Journal

      The Girl Scouts have nothing to do with each other and entirely different philosophies.

      The Boy Scouts are basically structured to be the youth program for the mormon church.

      The Girl Scouts are far more warm, friendly, and liberal.

      • The Boy Scouts are basically structured to be the youth program for the mormon church.

        Um, no - the Mormon units don't really interact with the rest of them. You should go work with a local Scout unit to see what they're about. Reading online complaints isn't the way to find out what acutally happens. Worst case, you've confirmed your fears and feel right about it. Best case, you learn something new.

        Also, the way Scouting is run is very dependent on the local culture - you'll find varying views among a v

        • Um, yes. I am an Asst. Scoutmaster, in a mormon troop. You are right that mormon units tend to associate with each other, and you are right that there can be differences in cultures, but the national BSA policies are exactly what the LDS church wants them to be.

        • by drinkypoo (153816)

          When they remove the emphasis on Jesus from the scouting materials and stop their homophobia then people might believe they're something other than a fascist religious organization.

        • by brianerst (549609)

          Actually, in Northeastern Illinois, the LDS church is the main organizer of the entire district. Most troops are not LDS affiliated, but all the main organizing events (council meetings, etc.) take place at the LDS church and they are definitely the prime movers.

          I'm not LDS and I have no problem with them running things. In general, scouting here is probably a little more liberal than in many areas - I don't detect any LDS "agenda". The LDS church is just really into Boy Scouts and they have lots of people

        • The top leadership of the BSA is now dominated by members of the LDS church. All the controversial national polices are in place because of this. The non-LDS local units are stuck with the no-win decision of either going along with this or having an unstated rule that scouts and leaders should lie about their sexual orientation and religious beliefs. This goes against the fundamental principles that scouting was founded on.

          As an Eagle Scout I refuse to do either of those things, and thus can no longer assoc

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 02, 2012 @09:36PM (#39228169)
      I'm a 48 year old Scout. I joined Boy Scouts at age 11 and have been a Scout or leader ever since. I'm an Asst. Scoutmaster (ASM) and have been for over 25 years now. I know about Scouting and its principles.

      I'm posting anonymously because I could be "fired" as a Scout leader for the things I'm about to say.

      The parent is incorrect in that Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts are different organizations. Girl Scouts do not bar membership for homosexuals or atheists. Boy Scouts ban both. I HATE the fact that Boy Scouts does this and makes it their official policy.

      Why they do this is fairly straightforward. In addition to posthumously baptizing Jews who died in the holocaust, the Mormon church has Boy Scouts as its OFFICIAL youth organization for boys. They do not have Girl Scouts as the organization for their girls, for exactly the difference in stance noted above.

      As such, I HATE the Mormon church. They are ruining an organization that I love very dearly.

      My personal feeling is that Scouting should be about lots of things - having a moral code that asks you to treat others with kindness and respect, and helping them when you can. It should have NOTHING to do with sex, let alone sexual orientation, nor should it require a belief in God. Simply a "higher power" would suffice for me, and would be consistent with other groups such as AA.

      I have struggled with this for many years. I have friends who have had to leave my troop because they are gay. One was a very close friend. His departure was a huge loss for our troop (but happily a gain for a more enlightened organization). I have almost sent my Eagle Scout award to Scouting for All, an organization working to change BSAs position on these two things. (I wish I could send it... I worked too hard for it to mail it away... I still struggle with this) Regardless it would do little good. BSA cannot afford to lose the Mormons. The organization would probably fold if it did, so the Mormons have BSA by the short hairs, and there isn't much that can be done.

      On a brighter note, while there is no Hacking Merit Badge, there are merit badges for Computers, Electronics, Engineering, Geocaching, Inventing, and Robotics.

      And there are troops out there that only pay lip service to the 2 principles discussed above. For example, in my troop, there is no requirement to profess a belief in God, so long as one does not publicly proclaim atheism. No Scout or leader has ever been dismissed for being a homosexual, so long as that information remains private. It is essentially a "Don't ask, Don't tell" policy. As such, it is flawed and asks people to live a lie, and is still wrong. But its the best we can do under the circumstance, for if we left an openly homosexual leader in place, the National Council would revoke our Charter, and the entire troop would cease to exist.

      Like I said, I struggle with this. I don't ask for pity or praise. I feel like a coward. Because I am a coward. I tell myself about the greater good, and put it out of my mind. But what hurts the most is that my position and actions basically controvert the exact principles on which Scouting was founded.

      On my honor.... (do I have any?)
      I will do my best... (am I?)
      To do my duty to God and my Country... (what will God think of me not standing up for my friend?)
      To obey the Scout Law... (how many of those words have I broken now?)
      To help other people at all times... (unless they are an atheist or gay?)
      To keep myself physically strong
      Mentally awake... (I guess I still have this one)
      And morally straight... ('nuff said)
      • A belief in a "higher power" is just a cop-out for belief in a deity. It has neither the rigor of belief in a deity that will hold you to account, nor the boldness of admitting none at all. If Scouting wants to maintain its insistence on belief in God, then it's entitled to - after all, it's a private organization. But don't be a fucking pussy about it.

        BTW, why not send in your certificate? You were awarded the Eagle; you earned it; you proved yourself. A principled resignation of your title does not dimin
      • > I HATE the Mormon church.
        I don't. I grew up in it, still belong to it I guess. It does good things. It does bad things. It's run by laypeople, many of whom are very sincere, many of whom are intelligent and reasonable, many of whom are genuinely Christ-like (turn-the-other-cheek as opposed to belligerent sanctimony).

        But collectively it is a global corporation with hordes of lawyers, accountants, and a budget many nations could envy, and it has considerable political clout. They really have hijacke

      • "I have almost sent my Eagle Scout award to Scouting for All, an organization working to change BSAs position on these two things. (I wish I could send it... I worked too hard for it to mail it away... I still struggle with this)"

        The harder you've worked for it, the greater the symbolism of rejecting it becomes.

        You could choose to start or join an organization with the same values, minus the discrimination.

      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        My personal feeling is that Scouting should be about lots of things - having a moral code that asks you to treat others with kindness and respect, and helping them when you can. It should have NOTHING to do with sex, let alone sexual orientation, nor should it require a belief in God.

        But you have to pledge your belief in God to even join, so if you don't, and you join, you're a hypocrite by definition.

        Simply a "higher power" would suffice for me, and would be consistent with other groups such as AA.

        So if you don't believe in some psychic mystical hoo-ha, you're a bad person?

        I have almost sent my Eagle Scout award to Scouting for All, an organization working to change BSAs position on these two things. (I wish I could send it... I worked too hard for it to mail it away... I still struggle with this)

        You can send it, and you will if you have the courage of your convictions.

        morally straight

        Prove it.

      • by Ihmhi (1206036)

        Sir, don't torture yourself any longer. The BSA has proven time and time again that they are completely unwilling to change their position on the issues of homosexuals and non-believers. Join an alternative scouting organization - or better yet, form a troop for one of them if you don't have one in your area - and do things the way the boy scouts should be doing them. Be accepting of everyone regardless of race, creed, orientation, etc. Teach the kids the same skills, the same life lessons.

        My high school wa

      • by Chelloveck (14643)

        I feel your pain. I'm 45 and an Eagle Scout. It's one of my proudest achievements. My time in Scouts was invaluable. But, my time predated the BSA declaring itself to be a religious organization. I was (and am) agnostic, but my troop's leaders helped me define what "reverent" and "duty to God" can mean in that context. How I could uphold the spirit of those values if not the letter.

        Jump-cut to my own son in Scouts. In his troop you could be any religion you wanted -- so long as it was of Judeo-Christian o

  • There are a lot of comments on the Boy and Girl Scout associations, but not yet many on the use of online merit badges as an alternative educational model.

    Imagine educational sites done easily in Drupal, in which users learned skills and knowledge sets about... well, anything. Skillsets disruptive to the status quo, for instance. Hacking. Encryption. True American Common Law. All manner of "disruptive" information. They could earn merit badges and level them up just as they do in an RPG, and display or li

    • That sounds more like a model for $PARTY_YOUTH than anything else, because you're teaching a catechism (True American Common Law, whatever that is, and I bet you have more) rather than just skills. Even more frightening - you've included a method for encouraging proselytizing and recruiting *and* a method to subtly enforce remaining a member.

      Kind of a combination of Amway and Scientology.

  • by sdguero (1112795) on Friday March 02, 2012 @08:23PM (#39227453)
    It's called an "explorer post." My troop was hosted by a kids Dad who was an engineer at a company that made Mars rover prototypes for NASA. We made websites for ourselves to start out, which they hosted on the companies web server (*nix running apache), and after we learned http we made websites for for car dealerships and other small businesses to raise money for the post. Among the many cool activities we did, they also let us program very expensive Mars rover prototypes to walk around and explore the office and we had challenges to see who could program the best runs etc...

    That experience, and having a computer in my room at very young age, are probably the two biggest reasons why I ended up choosing a career in Engineering. I have often thought that if I ever get off my lazy butt to do something good for the community it would be a technology explorer post like the one I was lucky enough to get into.
    • I did explorers back in '74. I sat at Bell Labs in Holmdel, nj and played Hunt The Wumpus on computers 50 miles away. Got to write any programs I wanted, any language I cared to tackle, on state of the art mainframes, with willing tutors for whatever direction I chose. Didn't realize the spectacular opportunity I was missing 'till much later. I'd give Explorers two thumbs up, except that I think they belong up the bigoted Boy Scouts of America's ass.
  • I think it's an awesome idea, but I disagree with the name "Hacker Scouts". I think "Hacker" is and has always been a misnomer for the hobbyist-level of Electrical Engineering, Structural Engineering, Computer Science, etc, with a real focus on repurposing everyday items.

    If you call it "Engineering Corps" or something like that, I could get behind it. I find it hard to believe you will have much support from the largely-brainwashed general masses using the term 'hacker'. "Being a hacker is bad! They take do

  • by stox (131684) on Friday March 02, 2012 @08:44PM (#39227675) Homepage

    1978, we spent Tuesday evenings with full run of the computer ( IBM 370/158 ) at Exxon R&D. Occasional field trips to places like the Sarnoff Labs ( RCA ), and
    Bell Labs. It was at Bell Labs I was introduced to C and Unix by Dennis Ritchie and Brian Kernighan. Little did I realize that I was going to make a career out of that.

  • Acquiring skills is a positive-sum game. We don't need to know who is "winning".

  • by bmo (77928)

    "MAKE Magazine asks: is it 'Time For Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts 2.0?' What might the future of education be like if it were based on online & earned skill badges, and what could the future of traditional organizations for kids, like the Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, be like in a very modern, tech-savvy world?

    Wasn't this answered decades ago when they came up with Explorers?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_for_Life [wikipedia.org]

    Typical Explorer posts include groups of teenagers specializing in a field such as law e

  • be T-shirts pre-stained with Cheetos?

  • by wierd_w (1375923) on Friday March 02, 2012 @10:56PM (#39228721)

    The idea is not to expose kids to technology. They are surrounded by it already. They can't help but be "exposed."

    The idea is to expose technology to the kids. Far too much of modern technology comes with the implied "pay no attention to the man behind the curtain!", and not nearly enough "oh, you like the glowing green head projector? Here's how to make him have boobies on his head and a snidley whiplash mustache! And this button makes him sound like a chipmunk! Would you like your own big green glowing head projector? Awesome! Here's how I made mine!"

    There is far too much compartmentalization in modern society, and due to that, there is a very large demographic that relies on children not being more savvy than them with tech. This is mostly in educational and political circles. This reliance makes a conflict of interest when it comes to tech; they teach just enough to use, but not enough to comprehend and adapt the tech. (They call this a wide variety of things, but the most common is "abuse" of the technology, or vandalism.)

    Maker scouts would focus on kids that have already been exposed to the tech, and want to learn more. It would actively encourage novel applications of technology, and the creation of disruptive appliances. In short, it would be every technology teacher's nightmare come true, where the kids learn dangerous things like assembler, kernel hacking, lowlevel electronics and computer logic, and graduate from drawing penises on the lab computers, to creating network worms that do it for them.

    I would really love to see something like this, but I realize that most people would consider this on par with having a terrorist training camp for cyber terrorists.

    The idea is exactly the opposite though. Terror comes from ignorance, and learned helplessness more often than not. This would seek to break that trend. The kids that come out would know what real cyberwarfare is, and laugh at the antics paraded around on the news, like many of us do.

  • by jejones (115979) on Friday March 02, 2012 @11:37PM (#39228949) Journal

    My sole experience in Scouting was with an Explorer post at what was then the Oklahoma City Western Electric works where my mother worked. A group of us (I remember two sisters and their brother and myself) went there, I forget how many evenings a week, and learned FORTRAN on an IBM 1130 and FOCAL and PDP-8 assembly language (on a PDP-8, of course). That would be around 1973 or 1974.

  • "we don't see 'leaderboards' for skills yet"

    No, I hope, will we ever do so. Leaderboards encourage finding ways to rank high on the leaderboards, not the retention and extension of skills.

  • ...when the idea tanks and the decision is made to shut down the servers... *poof*, all that achievement, gone.

  • There have been a few rescues here in Arizona of boy scout troops who got lost or read their map wrong and only had two days of food and water for what turned out to be a four day hike.

  • This could easily generate a dozen excellent merit badges, especially for Eagle Scouts. Hardware recycling projects or open source project creation would be wonderful. Preferably free software, but there are enough worthwhile Apache licensed projects to be worth doing. They could link conservation projects to hacking projects for tracking endangered species or park maintenance or scheduling urban renewal work.

    Even simple tasks such as "build a server from scratch" could be awarded, and generate some early s

  • My opinion of the Boy Scouts is pretty low; my opinion of the Girl Scouts depends on which troop and local they are with, since there is a lot of variance in what each Troop Mom allows. But why should it be necessary to replace the entire organization just to teach electronics, computers, and hacking skills? Get off the ideological high horse, and go offer to teach some scouts. If you don't agree with the policies of the scouts in your area, find an existing organization that you can help. A YMCA Open Unive

  • As long as we leave out the militarism, paedophilia and everything else lord baden powell.

(1) Never draw what you can copy. (2) Never copy what you can trace. (3) Never trace what you can cut out and paste down.

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