Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Cellphones Power Wireless Networking Hardware

4G Phones Are Really Fast — At Draining Batteries 281

Posted by Soulskill
from the buzzwords-take-a-lot-of-juice dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "With Verizon's 4G network covering a good chunk of the country and AT&T gaining ground, more smartphone users have access to the fastest wireless service available. But because 4G coverage isn't truly continuous in many locations, users' batteries are taking a big hit with 4G, as phones spend an lot of battery power trying to hunt down a signal. 'You've got a situation where the phones are sending out their signals searching and searching for a 4G tower, and that eats up your battery,' says Carl Howe, a vice president for research firm Yankee Group. The spottiness of 4G stems at least in part from the measured approach carriers have taken to it, rolling out the service city by city. There are a few tricks 4G users can try to extend battery life such as turning off your 4G connection when you don't need the fastest speeds — when using email, for instance — or using a program such as JuiceDefender to search for apps you may have downloaded that you don't need to run all the time, and erase them."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

4G Phones Are Really Fast — At Draining Batteries

Comments Filter:
  • by Trepidity (597) <delirium-slashdot@@@hackish...org> on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:13PM (#38962855)

    Newest Generation of Consumer Electronics Item Uses More Energy Than Previous Generation Did

    • Not so fast (Score:5, Insightful)

      by MrEricSir (398214) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:45PM (#38963047) Homepage

      I'm typing this on a MacBook Air, which gets about 3x the battery life of my previous laptop. And the room I'm in has CFL bulbs which are about 1/4 as power hungry as the old fashioned bulbs.

      So no, newer electronics don't *always* use more power.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by mjwx (966435)

        I'm typing this on a MacBook Air, which gets about 3x the battery life of my previous laptop. And the room I'm in has CFL bulbs which are about 1/4 as power hungry as the old fashioned bulbs.

        So no, newer electronics don't *always* use more power.

        Your macbook cant do what an old P4 Laptop couldn't.

        Your macbook gets a higher score on the battery because it gets a lower score on everything else.

        I had an Asus U30SD. The U30SD has the Optimus graphics chipset, this is a GF520M and an Intel 3000, if I want to play games, I have to use the GeForce chip which gives it a battery life of 6 hours, if I use the Intel IGM, I get a battery life of 10 hours. I now have a U46SV with a GeForce 540M and the discrepancy is worse. Do you see the inverse relation

        • Now the reason LTE phones use more power then HSPA phones is that the LTE transmitter is not integral to the SoC, it is it's own chip. Once the new ARM line is released (mid this year IIRC) we'll see battery life improve significantly as LTE chips will be integrated into the SoC like HSPA chips currently are.

          No, that's not a significant factor here. The modem and RF are very unlikely to be integrated into the same die as the AP, as their life-cycle are quite different. At best it's integrated in the same package, but not in the same die (as in the SnapDragon chips). That's a bit more power efficient (shortest connections between AP and BB/RF), but it's negligible compared to the power consumption of a radio access subsystem.

          One of the issue with each new WAN technology is that each major generation greatly in

        • by blueg3 (192743)

          Your macbook cant do what an old P4 Laptop couldn't.

          Bullshit. Unless, as the rest of your comment suggests, the specific application you're interested in has basically no CPU demand and is entirely performed by the graphics card. Even the M-series Core i5 (what's in the newest Air) outperforms a P4 and the SSD on an Air certainly outperforms a P4-era hard drive. So that's two components of "everything else" that are not worse.

          To elaborate, the Intel graphics chip in your laptop is integrated into the CPU die, so it's powered from the same source as the CPU rather then being a seperate chip with a seperate power supply, do you honestly think you'll be getting the same battery life if you had a discrete graphics card?

          Even discrete graphics cards share a power supply, although that's not what makes them more power-hungry. However, unless you know whi

      • by wvmarle (1070040)

        Your MacBook can also do with more modern batteries, which may have double capacity what your old laptop had. Hard to compare. When I bought my iBook about eight years ago I could get 5, and dimming the screen up to 6 hours battery life out of it. Pretty good for the time. I don't think current Apple laptops can do 15 hours now, have yet to see even a netbook that betters 8-9 hours.

    • Apple again (Score:2, Insightful)

      by goombah99 (560566)

      Wow this same story keeps happening. Apple elects to go with 2G edge instead of 3G. Gets ridiculed. The all the 3G phones have connection problems and drain their batteries. Apple delays 4G. Gets pilloried. Oops the 4G phones are suck and regret. It's not that apple is always later to the party. Indeed they are a realtively early adopter (dynamic memory, graphic printers, .... ) and an early dropper of obsolete tech (floppies, zip drives, ports...).

      Like Paul Mason, they only serve their wine when

      • Re:Apple again (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Baloroth (2370816) on Wednesday February 08, 2012 @12:20AM (#38963267)

        The battery life problem, if you bothered to read even the summary instead of jumping to the comments to defend Apple, is because there isn't regular 4G coverage everywhere yet. In order for there to be an incentive to develop such widespread coverage, there must also be people willing to use that network (no massive network can be established entirely without users.) This means the only way good 4G coverage can ever happen is if there are issues with it in the early life cycle, and without those early adopters widespread 4G will never happen.

        So, without Android adopting 4G, Apple would never be able to follow suit, unless they want to receive the same complaints. Not that that would stop them, necessarily. Did you like all those dropped calls with the early iPhone because you were stuck on AT&T?

        • So, without Android adopting 4G, Apple would never be able to follow suit

          This is simply incorrect.

          The network would be upgraded with or without early adoption. The early adoption does help shake out issues (thanks as usual Android Beta Testers!) but a phone company lays out way in advance the capital required to upgrade the whole network, they are not going to be so insane as to rely on adoption in a few early cities to fund the rest of the expansion. It's just that the upgrade takes time, and as we see

          • by Bazer (760541) on Wednesday February 08, 2012 @03:30AM (#38964163)
            I'm in Central Europe and there has been complete 4G coverage in major cities before Apple even considered using it in the next iPhone. These days I can get 4G coverage in the outback (and I do need my tubes to be HD in there). Please don't excuse carriers in the US for not upgrading the infrastructure. They're robbing you blind.
        • Re:Apple again (Score:5, Interesting)

          by tlhIngan (30335) <slashdotNO@SPAMworf.net> on Wednesday February 08, 2012 @02:26AM (#38963901)

          So, without Android adopting 4G, Apple would never be able to follow suit, unless they want to receive the same complaints. Not that that would stop them, necessarily. Did you like all those dropped calls with the early iPhone because you were stuck on AT&T?

          Two different issues.

          First, Apple chose not to go LTE for one very good reason - the current LTE chipsets suck.

          Here's the thing. LTE is a data standard. It doesn't define a voice standard, and there's proposals on how to do voice-over-LTE. And people want to do voice calls. So LTE phones right now hop onto the UMTS (or CDMA) network in order to handle a voice call, while doing LTE for data. The problem is that LTE phones now need two chips - one to do LTE, another to do 3G/voice (ever notice how the LTE versions of phones are always larger? It's not just the larger battery). The iPhone doesn't have enough space for another chip. Plus the extra chip takes power.

          Now, Qualcomm has announced their roadmap that has a combined LTE/UMTS/GSM/CDMA baseband (listed as LTE+voice) in a single chip, which is anticipated to be in the next iPhone.

          As for AT&T's dropped calls - it was because of over-aggressive power management from iPhones causing the control channel to be congested (which leads to dropped calls everwyhere in general). The irony being that the cells on AT&T were very underutilized (30-40%) but the control channel being completely saturated means dropped calls, slow data and other things.

          As for who drives things - well, the carriers work with handset manufacturers. The carriers want to deploy the Next Big Thing that can charge customers more money for, and since Apple's basically an untouchable (the carrier bends to Apple's will), they work with HTC and others to stick in new chips to try to get people to pay more for a new network.

          LTE deployment is quite interesting. When the (original 2G) iPhone came out, the 3G deployment in North America was quite spotty (the North American carriers chose 2G+ technolgies prior to the proper 3G rollout), but quite solid in Europe and Asia. These days, LTE deployment in North America is far more than Europe and Asia

          • Here's the thing. LTE is a data standard. It doesn't define a voice standard, and there's proposals on how to do voice-over-LTE. And people want to do voice calls. So LTE phones right now hop onto the UMTS (or CDMA) network in order to handle a voice call, while doing LTE for data. The problem is that LTE phones now need two chips - one to do LTE, another to do 3G/voice (ever notice how the LTE versions of phones are always larger? It's not just the larger battery). The iPhone doesn't have enough space for another chip. Plus the extra chip takes power.

            You're definitely right that space is very important for skinny smartphones, and integration will help reducing the floor plan size for the 4G subsystem.
            But for power consumption, integrating several dies into a single package doesn't change things much (it's not single die integration). The improvement in coming chips will come from moving from 40 nm to 28 nm in most cases. And there's a lot to do to improve implementation efficiency, but the big guys don't seem too concerned by this. As in 3G they make b

      • by wvmarle (1070040)

        As I don't use mobile data, a year or two back ago I switched from 3G back to 2G. Not only are voice plans much cheaper, I don't notice any quality difference (shops will tell you that 3G has superior call quality - well I had less problems with reception after the switch back to 2G!) and battery life of the phone is far better. Also my phone didn't heat up so badly anymore.

    • Newest Generation of Consumer Electronics Item Uses More Energy Than Previous Generation Did

      The worst part is we don't need the extra speed, we need better coverage and better data plans.

  • Very frustrating (Score:4, Interesting)

    by jpwilliams (2430348) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:17PM (#38962887)

    I'm in SF, and I upgraded from an iPhone 3G to a HTC Thunderbolt with 4G. The Thunderbolt, even brand new, has to be charged twice a day at least, and I keep things like Bluetooth and wifi off most of the time. If I don't plug in my phone at night, it will be dead by morning.

    Coming from someone who carefully manages when I plug my electronics in so as to extend their usable battery life, it sucks to have to feel like my phone always needs to be plugged in.

    Is the 4g tech itself power hungry? Mine seems to have battery trouble even when I'm stationery and the 4g signal is strong.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Coming from someone who carefully manages when I plug my electronics in so as to extend their usable battery life, it sucks to have to feel like my phone always needs to be plugged in.

      >

      Take your nickel-chemistry assumptions about how to treat a battery out back and shoot them. There's this new battery tech called lithium-ion -- perhaps you've heard of it>? -- used in a few devices (by which I mean everything), and it does not like discharge cycles, especially deep discharges. Keep it plugged in.

    • Unfortunately the HTC Thunderbolt, one of the first attempts at a 4G handset in the US, is plagued with battery issues. A quick Google [google.com] search shows that it's not just you. There are also many things you can do to try to extend the battery life such as using a resource manager like JuiceDefender [android.com] that aggressively manages your radios and display options when not in use. You can also use the phone's built-in power saving mode which can be found in your phone's settings menu. This will perform the same task in

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by quacking duck (607555)

      People mocked Apple for not including 4G in the iPhone 4S, but your experience, and that of the entire article, seems to validate their position: 4G technology just isn't power-efficient enough (YET) to include without forcing Apple to either include a much bigger (heavier, bulkier) battery, or cut their estimated usage time significantly.

      The competition pushed the "bigger screen = better" in part because it's a genuinely requested feature, but the unspoken reason was to hide the fact a bigger battery was n

      • by TubeSteak (669689)

        4G technology just isn't power-efficient enough (YET)

        The problem isn't just the 4G hardware in the phone, it's the 4G coverage offered by cell towers.
        Since coverage is spotty, the phone will spend a lot of time with the radio cranked to the max, desperately searching for a signal.

        If you want to test this out, stick your phone in a *microwave.
        It's not a perfect faraday cage, but it's good enough and I guarantee your battery will be dead within a few hours.

        *I suggest you unplug the microwave first, to avoid any accidents.

      • Re:Very frustrating (Score:4, Informative)

        by norpy (1277318) on Wednesday February 08, 2012 @03:44AM (#38964225)

        The power usage of an LCD is by far dominated by the creation of light, the number of pixels will increase power consumption but not by anywhere near as much as the bigger back light.

    • Interesting, I work in downtown SF and live in the East Bay and have no problem getting a full day out of a charge on my Tbolt. I picked up the phone around launch, and on the original stock firmware, battery life was pretty abysmal. I'm currently running a custom rom (Liquid Thunderbread 2.6), and now easily get a day on normal use (including roughly an hour of continuous browsing on BART each workday). My wife has the same phone and can get a couple days (she works in the East Bay and uses the Internet

      • I just thought I'd say thanks for actually using the proper grammar - "... uses the Internet much less than I" (with implied 'do'). Good job, good example! :)

    • by clarkn0va (807617)
      I get better battery life if I leave wifi on. It uses less power than 3G. The exception would be if I know I'm going to be away from wifi for a while, like on the highway, but as long as your phone is passing data (when isn't it?), it's better on the battery and on the pocket book to pass it over wifi.
    • Re:Very frustrating (Score:5, Informative)

      by Solandri (704621) on Wednesday February 08, 2012 @01:40AM (#38963667)

      Is the 4g tech itself power hungry? Mine seems to have battery trouble even when I'm stationery and the 4g signal is strong.

      Most 4G tech is using OFDMA [wikipedia.org]. It achieves higher data rates than CDMA by using heavier signal processing to extract the data signal destined for your phone out of all phones in a cell. Previously this processing required too much power for a mobile device. But low-power CPU tech has advanced enough to where it's realistic to use it on a phone. As processor power requirements drop, the power needed for 4G will likewise drop.

    • Is the 4g tech itself power hungry? Mine seems to have battery trouble even when I'm stationery and the 4g signal is strong.

      The same for my Evo 4G, but I'm told the latest 4G models at CES consume less power and also run less hot on 4G. For me, I have 4G turned off almost all the time, and it's really only when I need 4G speed that I turn it on (which happens only once every couple of days).

      For most things like Google Navigation, downloading regular-sized apps, listening to streaming podcasts, doing email, and browsing the web, 3G is usually ok enough. It's really for watching movies at high resolution, doing video chat, downloa

  • by Freaky Spook (811861) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:18PM (#38962899)

    Where your phone would last a week on stand-by and you wouldn't have to hang around the single power socket in the airport departure lounge with all the other smartphone junkies waiting to charge your phone.

    • by phayes (202222)

      You still can, but you have to turn off all the extras. I have lasted 6 days between charges on my iPhone 4 when out of the country & not using wifi/bluetooth/3G which were all turned off. I was even using the iphone's camera a lot but I had to switch away from the camera app quickly because it drains the battery.

    • by QuasiSteve (2042606) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:27PM (#38962943)

      You mean you miss the good old days where your phone was just a phone and texting capabilities was a luxury?

      Because you know they still sell those, right? And those now get two weeks to a month.

      Let's face it, the reason our fancy phones with internet, apps, etc. don't last very long is two-fold...
      1. They do use more power - not much you can do about that right now unless you want to give up the capabilities again.
      2. We keep wanting smaller and/or thinner phones. I promise you that if people would accept a phone half an inch thick again, battery life would be much improved - simply by virtue of being able to fit a much, much greater capacity battery.

      • by Ayanami_R (1725178) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:46PM (#38963059)

        I would gladly take a "bulky" device with a ton of battery. I don't understand the the tablet manufacturers all trying to copy the thinness of the fruit product. Keep them relatively slim, but kill em on battery life. Take the transformer, it's thin enough and light enough. Now that they CAN make it slimmer than the fruit product DONT, fill the space with frigging battery!

        • by mlts (1038732) *

          Bingo. The phone I miss is my old T-Mobile MDA (rebranded HTC Wizard). It had the usual stuff (no 3/4G, of course, but Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, etc.), and it could run almost a week before needing to be charged. The reason why it had the battery life was partly due to the dual core OMAP CPU, and partially due to the fact that it was thick enough to handle a decent mAh battery.

          I wouldn't mind a phone having a couple millimeters of thickness, if it meant significantly more battery life, and a thicker Gorilla Glas

          • I read somewhere that coming soon is the Moto Razr MAX, which is just the Razr only thicker, with a bigger battery. Gee, I wonder why? :D

      • You mean you miss the good old days where your phone was just a phone and texting capabilities was a luxury?

        Or you could look at older mid range smart phones. My nearly 2 year old Nokia N79 gives about 5 days of use on a single charge with moderate 3G internet,voice and application use

    • Well, don't buy a smartphone. Get a RAZR, you can have that experience again.
    • by jonnat (1168035)

      I really don't.

    • Where your phone would last a week on stand-by...

      I don't. On that last day, usually in the morning, the phone would die and my charger would be at home. Once I started using phones with much less battery life, this actually stopped happening to me.

      ...and you wouldn't have to hang around the single power socket in the airport departure lounge with all the other smartphone junkies waiting to charge your phone.

      Charge your phone before you leave. This applies whether you measure your stand-by time in days or weeks.

  • I bought a triple sized battery for my 4G phone. My phone is friggin' enormous now... but I can use it on 4G for 12 to 16 hours. I have yet to completely kill it... even while using it on coast to coast flights.

    • by quacking duck (607555) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:36PM (#38962991)

      The fact you're on coast-to-coast flights (5-ish hours) should actually *increase* battery life for that charge, since you're in airplane mode and it's not hunting for cell or wifi signals.

      You're probably watching video or playing games more during the flight than you'd be running around on the ground of course, but I'm amazed how little battery is used when I watch an hour-long show on my iPhone while on the gym machines--less than 5% drained. For comparison, browsing the web or using Facebook for 30 minutes on the bus will eat 10%.

      • Yep, it's the radios that eat the juice, mostly. Unless you're doing raytracing on the phone! (Does anybody do that? It would be interesting....)

  • Android spergs (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Remember all the trolling Android spergs on Slashdot who bashed the iPhone 4S for not having 4G? So much for that.

    • by Solandri (704621)
      News flash. All the Android phones with 4G let you turn it off when you don't need/want it. I usually leave my 4G off unless I know I'm going to do something data-intensive.

      Given a choice between having a feature you can turn on and off at will, and not having the feature, the better choice is always having the feature. An iPhone 4S with 4G would've had exactly the same battery life as the 4G-less iPhone 4S, but you would've been able to get 4G data speeds whenever you felt the tradeoff in battery lif
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Given a choice between having a feature you can turn on and off at will, and not having the feature, the better choice is always having the feature. An iPhone 4S with 4G would've had exactly the same battery life as the 4G-less iPhone 4S, but you would've been able to get 4G data speeds whenever you felt the tradeoff in battery life was worth it.

        And how many of the gazillion people who bought iPhones would understand, much less remember, to do that?

        My dad can't remember turn his iPad's 3G receiver to save power when he's home on wi-fi. Fortunately for him, the 3G modem is pretty efficient and the darned thing still runs all day and all night on a charge.

        Apple has calculated that the no-fret longer battery life from a mature 3G chipset will result in happier customers in aggregate than the occasional speed boost of early 4G chipsets. I have zero dou

    • GPS, Siri, and Bluetooth are power hungry too. And yet, it doesn't mean that you need to be using them all the time.

      For me, 3G or wifi is usually good enough for what I do 95% of the time, but it's really when I need that extra speed/bandwidth that 4G has become a life saver.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:24PM (#38962921)

    The phones should really keep 4g off (& just stick to edge) unless you actually unlock your phone & start using network apps (e.g. you open mail, etc). Leave push notifications always on the most battery-efficient network available (wifi, edge, 3g, 4g, etc) & only turn on the faster networks when the apps are in focus & need them (e.g. browser, e-mail, etc) or if there's a background app that requests to use the highest-bandwidth connection available.

    yes, yes - there's a latency to turning on & associating the faster radio. however, that would only be noticed in the launch first bandiwdth-heavier app after phone unlock scenario. your standby time would be waaaay better.

    • You can do this with Tasker now (on Android), but of course, it should be an easy option in Settings for your typical user.

  • by markdavis (642305) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:25PM (#38962933)

    My first experience with 4G was early last year in Richmond on Sprint. Indeed it was fast, but I could almost watch my battery disappear! (OK, it wasn't THAT bad, but I estimated it cut my battery life in half). It was very handy to have the Android widget right on the first page to toggle 4G on/off, so it would shift back into the much more battery-friendly 3G.

    I do wish battery technology was on the same curve as CPU technology has been. Imagine- we could have super-smart phones that were twice as fast as now, but running on one charge a week or less. (Or perhaps we could finally have some good electric car range WITH great performance at the same time). Oh well, maybe in "5 to 7 years" or whatever the standard is for anything we still can't have...

    • by TubeSteak (669689) on Tuesday February 07, 2012 @11:44PM (#38963043) Journal

      TFA talks about the Droid Razr Maxx's crazy long standby, talk, and video playing time. Its secret isn't any secret at all.
      They took the dangerously thin Droid Razr, added less than 2mm in thickness, and then filled that space with a battery almost twice as large.

      3300 mAh vs the smart phone standard of ~1700 mAh.
      Designers refuse to make phones thicker in order to accommodate larger batteries.
      The Razr can get away with it because, for it, "thicker" is the normal size of other phones.

      • by ganjadude (952775)
        soo... if the razr being thicker is the same as other phones, that still doesnt explain why other phones cant have the same size batt....In fact you made the argument that the other phones should be smaller, or bigger batteries.
        • I suppose 'cause they first worked very hard to make the actual electronics very, very slim for design reasons.

          I also suppose that the logical conclusion of this progression is a paper-thin, flexible, transparent phone that sticks to your wrist and is powered by the motion of your hand. Which means that those sessions in the bathroom with the Penthouse centerfold will serve two purposes!

  • I know several people with 4g service, including me; none of us would turn it on unless we know we will get service (and use it) or are probing for service so we can know. Its not like 4g users dont already know the gist of the articl already.... youve got to be pretty unaware not to notice your battery drain when its on.

  • I do remember everyone saying the 4S absolutely needed 4G, but Apple kept 4G out of it for this reason - it would be horrible about battery life, so bad that it would negatively affect the consumer experience.

    Not that the 4S is great about battery life either, but imagine it worse.

    And all this for not even 4G. Its more like 3.75G, but the American carriers lobbied to bend the rules in advertisements.

    • Concur that the 4S isn't that hot on battery life. I could go 2 full days using my old 3GS, but after day 1 on my 4S it's just a bit below 50% and I won't risk it dying in the middle of day 2. I'm not even using the whiz-bang features like Siri much.

      It could just be iOS5 though--after updating my 3GS it was no longer able to last two days of usage, either.

  • Within a month of buying my iPhone last year, we went camping. I put a lot of effort into preserving the battery so I could test out the compass feature the following morning and take photos all day. I didn't realize that in being unable to find a signal, it would _continuously attempt it_ all night. I had about 90% battery when we went to bed, woke up to about 5%. I was pretty unhappy with this discovery, where I previously figured they were smarter than that.

    • Sounds to me like you didn't put ANY effort into preserving the battery.

      "a lot" of effort would have involved learning what kinds of things drain the battery beforehand and then avoiding them. Apple has a web page devoted to eeking the most you can get out of your iphone battery at http://www.apple.com/batteries/iphone.html [apple.com]

      A minimal amount of effort would have been turning the thing off, because turning a battery powered device off to save the batteries isn't exactly a revolutionary idea.

      So what exactly did

    • I didn't realize that in being unable to find a signal, it would _continuously attempt it_ all night.

      Yes, that's pretty much the same issue being mentioned, just that around any other city there's enough network coverage you never see that.

      When camping I turn on Airplne mode, unless I'm using the GPS. Sadly use of the GPS requires turning off airplane mode, I've never understood why a receive-only technology is disabled by something meant to stop emission of radio waves...

  • Seriously?
  • by MacTO (1161105) on Wednesday February 08, 2012 @01:08AM (#38963501)

    This sounds like the cost of being an early adopter. The infrastructure isn't in place yet, so you have to expend more power establishing and maintaining a signal. Assuming that 4G goes mainstream, things will probably be significantly better in a few years.

    Remember, these critters are radios and omnidirectional ones at that. Halving the distance to a tower will roughly quarter the required transmit power.

  • I used the free JuiceDefender on my EVO 4G in order to wrangle my radios, especially the 4G which is useless in my area. I bought the latest version Ultimate and am fairly happy with it, especially the geo based wifi learning. However I don't use it to remove apps I'm not using, and don't even recall offhand if that's a feature. Just saying. - HEX
  • by Ultra64 (318705)

    It's not like 4G speeds are even worth it when you get capped or throttled at a measly 2GB/month

  • ...killing batteries. Bluetooth and WiFi left on are sure ways to kill the battery right in the middle of that important call. Turn 'em off if you're not using 'em.

    Of course, it would make sense for these features to have kill switches in prominent view on the Home screen... I don't know of any interface that offers this, just silly little indicators anyone short of Hawkeyes would miss.

  • They design smartphones for speed.

  • Comon guys - Isn't this just a blatant JuiceDefender Slashvertisment? The issue may be real but I feel the shill count may have gone up by one...
  • by MMC Monster (602931) on Wednesday February 08, 2012 @07:06AM (#38964999)

    I'm surprised if someone hasn't patented this already. It's sure obvious enough:

    0. Download an app with the current 4G hot spots in the country
    1. Use GPS/map to remember 4G hot spots.
    2. Use 3G triangulation (which is always available) to see if you're near a 4G hot spot.
    3. If you're near a 4G hot spot, look for 4G.
    4. Once a day search for 4G.

Do not simplify the design of a program if a way can be found to make it complex and wonderful.

Working...