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VGA and DVI Ports To Be Phased Out Over Next 5 Years

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  • why phase out DVI? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Spy Handler (822350) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:43PM (#38762818) Homepage Journal
    it gives me crystal-clear digital connection to my monitor, and unlike HDMI, it works every time without fail.
    • by godrik (1287354) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:45PM (#38762860)

      Trying to close the analog hole I guess. Using "smart" HDMI can more easily be used with DRMs. Coupled with machine you can not choose the OS of, and you might have quite annoying copy protection schemes.

      • by Ynot_82 (1023749) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:52PM (#38763004)

        The "Analogue Hole" is unaffected by digital restrictions
        It's the illegitimate* analogue re-capturing of a legitimately decoded digital stream
        Think TV-capture card

        * From "their" POV

        • by SuricouRaven (1897204) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:04PM (#38763234)
          Pirates don't even need the analog hole. Both HD-DVD and blu-ray have been cracked enough to just decrypt the disc.
        • by cpu6502 (1960974) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:46PM (#38764030)

          So does this phase-out mean I won't be able to use the 4 VGA CRTs and 1 DVI LCD I have accumulated over the years?

          What a waste of perfectly functional equipment.

          • by FirstNoel (113932) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:50PM (#38764098) Journal

            No, You'll be able to use adapters...according to the article.

            Otherwise. yeah that would be a waste.

            • by EdIII (1114411) on Friday January 20, 2012 @04:11PM (#38766634)

              Adapters? I wuv adapters!

              How much do they cost? I know a bunch of clients and businesses that will be utterly delighted that their investment in hundreds of LCD monitors is going to be destroyed without the additional purchase of hundreds of adapters to work with new computers they purchase. It's not like they are going to spend the money to buy all new monitors.

              Business does not upgrade unless it absolutely has to do so (in my experience) and will attempt to retain the investment in every single piece of hardware they have. Take a guess why XP is till being used damn near everywhere in so many businesses? No reason to upgrade that justifies the cost of the licensing and retraining. I have a ton of LCD monitors that support DVI, but are connected with VGA simply because the thin/thick clients don't have DVI connectors.

              If we have not even switched over to DVI completely in business yet, what makes them think they can switch us to HDMI/Display Port? There has to be millions of perfectly good LCD monitors out there with DVI connectors capable of high resolutions that can be in service for at least another 5-10 years from today.

              VGA is understandable, but why on Earth get rid of DVI just yet?

              I just hope they are not dicks and there is a $100-$200 Display Port monitor out there when they do. It's not like those monitors are plentiful today on the market.

          • by Reece400 (584378) <Reece400@hotmail.com> on Friday January 20, 2012 @02:04PM (#38764304)
            You can already buy inexpensive HDMI / Display Port to VGA / DVI adaptors.
          • From your nic, I presume that you're not much up on the leading edge of computer hardware. In fact, I'll bet you have computers that have DB-25 ports.

            Perhaps you could hook up those monitors to your Hercules card [wikipedia.org]?

          • by TheRaven64 (641858) on Friday January 20, 2012 @02:35PM (#38764962) Journal

            Huh, I thought your karma was so bad you weren't allowed to post anymore.

            No, you won't have to throw it away, these ports simply won't appear on new equipment. Being able to connect to VGA is still useful for old projectors, but it's no longer sufficiently important to waste board space on it. I bought a mini DisplayPort to VGA adaptor for £5 including delivery. It contains a set of three 10-bit DACs to generate the VGA signal and works well. I take it with me when I'm going to give presentations, but the rest of the time my laptop is quite happy without VGA.

            I suppose that if your existing computer dies and you can afford a new computer, but can't afford a £5 adaptor then you may have to throw them away...

      • by PhrostyMcByte (589271) <phrosty@gmail.com> on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:00PM (#38763140) Homepage

        HDCP supported DVI before it supported HDMI, and has been available on graphics cards for years. This won't be closing any holes.

        • by Kjella (173770) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:29PM (#38763702) Homepage

          Ah yes, but neither DVI graphics cards nor DVI monitors required HDCP so it would always downgrade but then refuse to play protected content. HDMI has always had HDCP, it is required. So they are getting rid of the last unencrypted connections, of course HDCP is broken but still. Now you will no longer get a picture on an unlicensed device without being a criminal under the DMCA.

          • by YesIAmAScript (886271) on Friday January 20, 2012 @03:22PM (#38765818)

            Neither HDMI graphics cards nor HDMI monitors require HDCP. HDCP is not required on HDMI.

            I ran HDMI from my DirecTV receiver to my Dell display (DVI input) for years. No HDCP required nor used (and the display didn't support it!).

            There is nothing in the system that requires HDCP except the signal transmitting device. After the HDMI connection is set up, the transmitter knows whether it has active HDCP or not. The transmitter may then refuse to transmit video if the video it is to send is marked as not transportable over digital connections that don't use HDCP. For example an Xbox 360 will play games but not media content over a non-HDCP HDMI connection. A PS3 won't show anything at all over HDMI if there is no HDCP.

            There is absolutely nothing enforced by the monitor vis-a-vis HDCP. If the sender sends video and monitor understands the format and encryption it displays it. It is completely up to the sender to decide what should and should not be displayed.

            The rules for sending content over DVI are exactly the same as those over HDMI. If the content is marked as not showable over non-encrypted digital connections it cannot be shown over any non-encrypted digital connections, whether HDMI, DVI, MiniDP, etc.

            Would it be too big an imposition to become informed about the facts before projecting hate?

      • by ackthpt (218170) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:05PM (#38763240) Homepage Journal

        Trying to close the analog hole I guess. Using "smart" HDMI can more easily be used with DRMs. Coupled with machine you can not choose the OS of, and you might have quite annoying copy protection schemes.

        Yep. Hollywood and Big Media will be pushing for a monitor standard which detects uncertified video, blocks it, reports you and sets your house on fire.

        • by K. S. Kyosuke (729550) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:18PM (#38763536)

          Yep. Hollywood and Big Media will be pushing for a monitor standard which detects uncertified video, blocks it, reports you and sets your house on fire.

          Yes, but it will only work on x86 CPUs with the HCF instruction set extension.

        • by Kjella (173770) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:31PM (#38763726) Homepage

          They started a joint venture with Ubisoft?

      • by jythie (914043) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:10PM (#38763344)
        I suspect it is less because they want to close the analog hole.. and more 'because they can'. This is a huge power trip, and executives who push tech companies to do stuff like this successfully will have promotions and new oppurtutnies awaiting them because they showed how far they can piss.
      • by Wrath0fb0b (302444) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:28PM (#38763682)

        [DVI] gives me crystal-clear digital connection to my monitor, and unlike HDMI, it works every time without fail.

        Trying to close the analog hole I guess. Using "smart" HDMI can more easily be used with DRMs. Coupled with machine you can not choose the OS of, and you might have quite annoying copy protection schemes.

        Nevermind that HDMI is electrically equivalent (adapters are under $3 [monoprice.com].

        Nevermind that DRM operates at different layer than the physical interface, which itself is different from the electrical interface.

        Nevermind that HDMI and DVI, by virtue of the above, support the . Note that this is independent of whether a particular display does. [wikipedia.org]

        No, no, forget all that nonsense, the real question I have for your post is how you think anyone can try to close the analog hole by deprecating a digital interface?!

        • by idontgno (624372) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:44PM (#38763978) Journal

          Because DVI is also an analog interface? Or are you forgetting the VGA-compatible (analog) C1-C5 signals? Which are, amazingly not at all present in a HDMI connection.

          The digital portion of DVI is HDMI-equivalent. The analog portion of DVI is VGA-equivalent. The intent is to demolish VGA, including its equivalents. Hence, DVI has to be banished too.

          QED.

      • by sjames (1099)

        HDCP has been broken once and for all. The master key is out there.

    • by kimvette (919543) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:46PM (#38762872) Homepage Journal

      and unlike HDMI, it works every time without fail.

      That is why it is being killed off.

      • by ackthpt (218170) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:14PM (#38763446) Homepage Journal

        and unlike HDMI, it works every time without fail.

        That is why it is being killed off.

        Puts me in mind of the wonderful move to SATA connectors .. you know, those damn things which come loose and you have to shut down, open cabinet and push back in place? Honestly, what a horrible connector. HDMI impresses me as another connector which is weak. The next standard will probably have a built in spring for pushing it out at various intervals (usually while you are in the middle of that big presentation, like I was on Wednesday and the video cable to the projector kept falling out.)

        • by Rakishi (759894)

          As others have said, all my SATA connectors lock into place. That you bought yours from Jose at the corner for 5 cents a piece is not a problem with SATA but with you.

          • by Guspaz (556486) on Friday January 20, 2012 @03:51PM (#38766340)

            Actually, it was a legitimate problem with early SATA connectors. Manufacturers have since redesigned the connectors so that they don't suffer from this problem; these days, you can feel the SATA connector snapping into place when you plug it in. That wasn't true when they first came out, regardless of price.

    • by Synerg1y (2169962)

      Because futurists are moronic and don't understand that dvi = hdmi in terms of quality.

      • by Anrego (830717) * on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:04PM (#38763222)

        DVI was confusing to non-geeks.

        You had, what..

        DVI-D, DVI-A, and DVI-I .. plus "single link" and "dual link" thrown in for good measure, and different cables supporing subsets of those and adapters and a variety of "this works with that, but not this other thing".

        HDMI is HDMI .. you plug it in and not worry about whether you are using the right mode / cable for your setup.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by jythie (914043)
          Unless it doesn't work....
        • by eobanb (823187) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:25PM (#38763638) Homepage

          Then again there's HDMI 1.0, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, then for cables there's Standard, Standard with Ethernet, High Speed, plus converter cables to/from DVI, DisplayPort, VGA, and then of course there's HDCP...

          ...It's always going to be confusing to 90% of people no matter what.

        • by omnichad (1198475)

          Close...From Wikipedia:

          Standard HDMI Cable – up to 1080i and 720p
          Standard HDMI Cable with Ethernet
          Automotive HDMI Cable
          High Speed HDMI Cable – 1080p, 4K, 3D and Deep Color
          High Speed HDMI Cable with Ethernet

    • by RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) <taikiNO@SPAMcox.net> on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:48PM (#38762914)

      the port connector's huge. Not to mention Dual Link DVI is a pain in the ass.

      Display Port/Mini Display Port is tiny and free.

      • by PIBM (588930) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:00PM (#38763148) Homepage

        The port connector might be 'huge' by your standard, but at least it won't get out by itself, from either the computer or the monitors. I'm using 3 30" monitor in 2560x1600, and the images are always perfect, switch on immediatly too.

        On a TV gaming setup in the basement with HDMI, when there's way too much bass and the TV is vibrating with the sound (older retroprojection TV in which there is a lot of air), there happens some time where the security signal is lost and we lose the image for a few seconds, until it synchronize back. Doesn't happen with the DVI connector, which is a big plus for them.

        Anyway, what was your point about the dual link DVI being a PITA ?

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by X0563511 (793323)

          This could be solved without actually modifying the HDMI "connector" itself - just some body work around it.

          No technical reason you couldn't put securing screws around an HDMI connector, is what I mean.

        • by cr_nucleus (518205) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:17PM (#38763504)

          All fullsize displayport adapters i've seen feature a couple of little hooks to prevent cable getting loose.
          You then need to press some kind of button to release the plug and extract it, a-la rj45.

      • Don't you mean lack of dual link DVI is a pain in the ass? What problems are there with dual link, other than cheap graphics cards from 5 years ago not having had it?

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by ByOhTek (1181381)

      It lacks any "copy protection". Don't worry, the (MP|RI)AA thought police will be around shortly to help correct your faulty logic. If this fails, then they will work with their friends in the government to put you someplace safe and quite where you cannot be a threat to others with your silly notions.

    • it gives me crystal-clear digital connection to my monitor, and unlike HDMI, it works every time without fail.

      I suspect this is the problem. There are better option that are Defective By Design compliant, i don't see why we should settle for anything less in 2012.

  • Interesting (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Oxford_Comma_Lover (1679530) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:44PM (#38762826)

    The one that was introduced 13 years later is being phased out at the same time as the one that was introduced thirty-six years ago? How odd.

  • All about HDCP (Score:5, Insightful)

    by TankSpanker04 (1266400) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:46PM (#38762884)

    I suspect the driving force toward HDMI-only is anti piracy efforts in the form of mandatory HDCP on any new display hardware.

  • Ain't happening (Score:5, Insightful)

    by DesScorp (410532) <DesScorp.Gmail@com> on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:47PM (#38762904) Homepage Journal

    We've still got serial ports. There are still motherboards with a parallel port, for goodness sake. VGA ain't going away anytime soon.

    • by Microlith (54737)

      Sure it is. When the source of your video signal no longer includes a DAC to generate the VGA signal, there's no point in including the connector on the mainboard. If Intel and AMD are dropping VGA support for their integrated GPUs, then your only option will be an external GPU for VGA. And even then the significantly reduced usefulness of a VGA port means it'll be rapidly dropped from new monitors.

      We've still got serial ports. There are still motherboards with a parallel port, for goodness sake.

      I haven't s

    • Re:Ain't happening (Score:5, Informative)

      by rubycodez (864176) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:56PM (#38763058)
      I've never seen a motherboard *without* a parallel port or serial. they're not connected, but they are there. hell, my two month old motherboard with the trendy eSata and DVI for six core chip has floppy and "game" port on it!
  • by slimjim8094 (941042) <slashdot3@NosPAM.justconnected.net> on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:51PM (#38762972)

    While I like DVI and have a monitor that uses it, going HDMI only is not a big deal. HDMI is just DVI plus a little extra, for audio, and the cost of that "little extra" is already negligible.

    This means that a DVI-DVI, HDMI-HDMI, and DVI-HDMI cable are the same price. I spent $5 on one a few years back.

    No difference! Unbunch your panties

  • 30 Years of VGA (Score:5, Insightful)

    by scorp1us (235526) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:52PM (#38762978) Journal

    Lets hope that whatever follows has the same longevity as VGA. In a world where we've invented USB 3 times (USB, mini USB and micro USB) with non-compatible connectors in just 11 years, the future does not look as good.

  • HDMI fasteners? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by planckscale (579258) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:52PM (#38762982) Journal
    One concern I have with HDMI are the connectors in PC's and how they are fairly easy to disconnect and damage. Also one of my HDMI cables became damaged because of a sharp angle. Sure there are adapters and alternative cables like these http://www.smarthome.com/81271/HDMI-Cable-with-Secure-Connection-Screw-in-Fastener-15-Feet/p.aspx [smarthome.com] , but they are not the standard. I've never really had a problem with screwing in VGA or DVI connectors except for the random stripped screw.
  • by overshoot (39700) on Friday January 20, 2012 @12:56PM (#38763060)
    This is one of the things that happens when you have three or four video chip sources, including the ones embedded in processors and system logic.

    Ten years ago, there were enough other companies in the game that your chances of finding one supporting "legacy" interfaces was a lot better.

  • VGA has been dead for some time - even the cheapest monitors are starting to use DVI, so in 5 years, I can see it totally dying out - I mean, sure, some people will still be using it with older machines and older monitors, but in new ones, yeah.

    As to DVI? It's not a big loss to loose the ports. Even they start putting HDMI and DisplayPort everywhere, it takes a simple cable to go from HDMI to DVI or visa-versa. My monitors currently wiegh in at one with 1xDVI, 1xVGA, one with 1xDVI, 1xVGA, 1xS-Video, 1xComposite, 1xComponent, and one with 1xVGA, 2xDVI, 1xDP, 1xHDMI, 1xComponent, 1xComposite.

    I think 5 years sounds like a reasonable timespan to see the newer ports become big. That said, I see a lot of HDMI adoptation, but most of the graphics cards are still DVI and HDMI - the only machine I have with DisplayPort out is my laptop. 5 years is a lot of new graphics cards however.

    As to the replacements, I'm not going to complain. HDMI and DisplayPort are much nicer to plug/unplug than DVI cables - and no need to worry about dual-link or not. As to VGA - I havn't used it in a long time. Due to the HDMI/DVI compatibility, I don't really see this causing much hurt to anyone either.

    • by Lumpy (12016) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:18PM (#38763534) Homepage

      HDMI sucks.

      Why? not because of HDMI.... Because of the worthless HDCP that is designed to make life miserable.

      HDCP keys, handshakes, etc all make hdmi distribution expensive. The low grade dog food stuff does not do Key caching and management.

      And god help you if you want to do a hdmi matrix. the ONLY company that has one that works is Crestron. Their DM switchers are the ONLY choice for a 16X16 or larger Hdmi switching that works.

  • Projectors (Score:4, Interesting)

    by ironjaw33 (1645357) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:04PM (#38763218)

    I travel to give the occasional presentation and I think I've only seen one or two projectors in the past 5 years that had something other than a VGA input. This is probably why many business laptops still have VGA outputs at the expense of providing others like DisplayPort, DVI, or HDMI.

    The other problem is that monitors and projectors long outlive their PC contemporaries. I've got a 20" Dell LCD that I purchased in 2003 that's still going strong today. It has VGA and DVI inputs, since only in the past few years have HDMI and DisplayPort become standard on monitors.

    I'm rather partial to DisplayPort and Thunderbolt since the connectors are smaller and don't have pins that are easily bent, but these outputs aren't too common in laptops, unless you have a Mac.

  • by dogbertsd (251551) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:07PM (#38763290)

    It may be that many of you in the home market won't miss VGA, but in most corporate offices, VGA is the only common connection supported by the projectors in most conference rooms. While an adapter is an option, I suspect that laptops marketed to businesses will have VGA adapters for longer than the next five years as the refresh cycle for projectors is generally much longer than the refresh cycle for laptops.

  • by GodfatherofSoul (174979) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:12PM (#38763398)

    Looks like the phase-out already started. I set up a computer for my parents over the holidays and we had to drive all over to find one. Only one I found was an overpriced gold-plated Radio Shack model.

  • Awesome (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:13PM (#38763418)

    Now I can pull video cable up the back of a workstation without it catching on every god damned cable, wire, footstool and purse in the remote vicinity.

  • by lobiusmoop (305328) on Friday January 20, 2012 @01:18PM (#38763520) Homepage

    And people complain that the Raspberry Pi (which is not even out the door yet) doesn't support VGA... sheesh.

  • by 3.1415926535 (243140) on Friday January 20, 2012 @02:06PM (#38764338)

    DisplayPort can be converted to HDMI or single-link DVI with a cheap, passive adapter.
    You can also convert it to VGA or dual-link DVI using active adapters (they show up to the computer as DisplayPort devices).

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