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Hardware Science

FDA Approves Self-Sanitizing Keyboard 185

Posted by samzenpus
from the clean-zone dept.
jfruhlinger writes "Deep down, most people know that the germiest thing they touch all day is the thing they're touching all day: their keyboard. But what, if anything, can be done about it? A couple of former Microsoft hardware guys have launched a keyboard that sterilizes itself via ultraviolet light. While the FDA has signed off on it, tests show that the UV only kills about two-thirds of the germs living in it, and that it still needs to be cleaned by hand."
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FDA Approves Self-Sanitizing Keyboard

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  • by bogaboga (793279) on Thursday January 05, 2012 @02:03AM (#38593062)

    "...While the FDA has signed off on it, tests show that the UV only kills about two-thirds of the germs living in it, and that it still needs to be cleaned by hand."

    Given that we as human beings are full of germs of some kind (especially on the skin), I wonder whether the germs on these keyboards are germs one should worry about.

    Are they dangerous?

    My answer: Not really, because no epidemic has ever been reported as having had its genesis from an un-cleaned keyboard. I have a feeling that these keyboards will appeal to clean-freaks mostly.

  • by Yev000 (985549) on Thursday January 05, 2012 @04:12AM (#38593626)

    Not fit for purpose.

    The application here is designed to kill MRSA type bugs within 90 seconds and be ready for use.

    The lights it comes with will make you blind very quickly, hence the enclosure.

  • by Hitokiri Battousai (702935) on Thursday January 05, 2012 @09:14AM (#38594830)

    Stainless steel is similarly naturally antimicrobial.

    No, it's not. Which you'd have known if you'd clicked on the GP's link. From Wikipedia [wikipedia.org]:

    Unlike copper alloys, stainless steel (S30400) does not exhibit any degree of bactericidal properties. This material, which is one of the most common touch surface materials in the healthcare industry, allows toxic E. coli O157:H7 to remain viable for weeks.

    The GP is also inaccurate in implying that copper alloys are used in all hospitals; this seems to be a relatively recent realization and is only slowly being rolled out.

    St. Francis Private Hospital ... decided to become the first hospital in the world to fully specify hygienic copper door handles throughout its facility as part of its infection control program. A full upgrade of all door furniture ... commenced in January 2010.

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