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Gigabyte Board Sets Intel X79 Overclocking Record 113

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the central-heating-system-replacement dept.
MojoKid writes "Renowned overclocker 'Hicookie' achieved a new high clock speed on the Intel Core i7 3930K processor by cranking the chip past 5.6GHz using a Gigabyte GA-X79-UD3 motherboard, the first mobo in the world to achieve a mulitplier of 57x. There was a bit of a scandal with Gigabyte recently when a YouTube video showed one of its X79 boards going up in smoke. Gigabyte released a BIOS update for several of its X79 boards to prevent such incidents from happening, and there were outcries that the new F7 BIOS would ... [reduce] overclocking performance; Hicookie's achievement should erase those concerns."
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Gigabyte Board Sets Intel X79 Overclocking Record

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  • by jibjibjib (889679) on Monday January 02, 2012 @11:18PM (#38568986) Journal

    For some applications 2 cores at 5.6GHz are better than any number of cores at 3GHz.

  • Re:Stoopid. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by adolf (21054) <flodadolf@gmail.com> on Tuesday January 03, 2012 @01:02AM (#38569406) Journal

    As long as you stay reasonable (don't change voltages) you're getting a good performance gain for free. Why not get a 30% performance boost?

    Because some of us would rather pay more to get a 30% performance boost without fiddling about trying to gauge system stability, and others of us are happy enough with the out-of-the-box stable systems that we have by default.

    I've done my share of overclocking (having first overclocked a 386SX from 33MHz to 40MHz, a P100 to 120, and then some K6-2s from 300 to 350), but lately I'd rather just have a system that is both reliable and that doesn't need fucking-with.

    YMMV.

  • Re:Stoopid. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by drsmithy (35869) <.moc.liamg. .ta. .yhtimsrd.> on Tuesday January 03, 2012 @07:05AM (#38570662)

    Obviously you're misinformed, since a gentle overclock, say a few hundred Mhz, is well within the average chip capacity, with no appreciable impact on chip lifespan compared to the gain.

    Such a small overclock will also have no appreciable impact on performance, either, outside of benchmarks.

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