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Intel Portables Hardware

Intel Details New Ultrabook Reference Designs 186

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the smaller-is-better dept.
MojoKid writes "Earlier this year, Intel unveiled its plan to redefine the concept of a PC around an ultra thin-and-light chassis reminiscent of the Macbook Air and with a standard CPU TDP of just 15W. Intel has unveiled the reference specs for ultra-notebook products they're calling 'Ultrabooks.' The cheaper ultra-notebook model will be 21mm thick with a BOM (bill of materials) between $475-650. A second, thinner model (18mm thick) will have a BOM between $493-710. Unlike netbooks, Ultrabooks will target the full range of consumer notebooks with screen sizes ranging from 11-17 inches. Reports are surfacing that the new systems will eschew the use of module-based components in favor of directly soldering certain components to the motherboard. Other findings indicated that Intel and its partners have researched alternatives to an aluminum-based chassis with materials like fiberglass expected to dominate the segment."
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Intel Details New Ultrabook Reference Designs

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  • Re:So (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Lord Byron II (671689) on Monday August 08, 2011 @09:08AM (#37021626)

    This is Intel's effort to reclaim some of the profit margin they gave up when netbooks became popular. The idea is to create a premium form factor that offers enough perks to make them attractive compared to a netbook, while keeping the price under that of the entry level MacBook Air (currently $999).

    Don't get too excited about a $475 BOM, though. That number comes from Intel and the purpose is to convince manufacturers that they can produce a retail $999 ultrabook and still make a profit. Manufacturers have been expressing doubts about the form factor.

  • by Vectormatic (1759674) on Monday August 08, 2011 @09:11AM (#37021660)

    TDP = Thermal Design Power, as in the maximal power usage it is designed for.

    Your T61 might have a power usage of 15W, but the cpu TDP for various T61 is around 35 W

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